Linux Journal

An Update on Linux Journal

So many of you have asked how to help Linux Journal continue to be published* for years to come. First, keep the great ideas coming—we all want to continue making Linux Journal 2.0 something special, and we need this community to do it.

Looking for New Writers and Meet Us at SCaLE 16x

If you're interested in writing for us, we want to hear from you—or even better, here's a chance to meet us in person to discuss the possibilities. If you're going to SCaLE16x, grab a beer with tech editor Kyle Rankin (@kylerankin) and talk about LJ writing opportunities at 6:30pm tomorrow (March 9, 2018) at The Yardhouse (300 E Colorado Blvd #220, Pasadena).

Write for Linux Journal!

Participate in the Linux Journal comeback! We are always looking for new writers from the Linux community. If you're interested, please send a brief proposal to write@linuxjournal.com. We're open to all ideas related to Linux, open source and adjacent technologies, but here are just a few topics to help get you started:

The Refactor Factor

Kyle Rankin, Tech Editor, announces our "new" monthly digital publication and describes how you can help the LJ community.

$25k Linux Journalism Fund

Linux Journal's new parent, Private Internet Access, has established a $25k fund to jump-start the next generation of Linux journalism—and to spend it here, where Linux journalism started in 1994.

Happy New Year- Welcome to Linux Journal 2.0!

Talk about a Happy New Year. The reason: it turns out we're not dead. In fact, we're more alive than ever, thanks to a rescue by readers—specifically, by the hackers who run Private Internet Access (PIA) VPN, a London Trust Media company.

[Updated: LJ is back!] Linux Journal Ceases Publication

On January 1, 2018 Linux Journal was saved and brought back to life by a company called London Trust Media, the parent company of Private Internet Access. The comeback issue of Linux Journal has a release date of March 15, 2018. The article below, originally published in early December of 2017, is preserved for history. EOF

So Long, and Thanks for All the Bash

It was the summer of 2007 and I was at Linux World Expo in San Francisco. I had just finished updating the second edition of Knoppix Hacks and in addition to attending the conference I was there to promote it and my other books at the O'Reilly booth. Somehow I got word that Linux Journal was looking for new authors and was holding an event at a nearby bar later that day.

Linux Journal October 2017

Bash and Cats If someone asked me how the internet stays running, I'd probably say something like, "Bash scripts and cat photos." Because really, those two things pretty much encompass the h

Linux Journal September 2017

Soup to Nuts One of my favorite things about Linux is that it has become not only the platform of choice for many projects, but it also tends to inspire an entire ecosystem of open-sourc

Write for Us!

Summer is slowly coming to an end, schools are going into session, and we're all gathering projects and topics to get us through the winter. If you have any interesting topics or projects you're working on, we'd love to hear about them.

Will Anything Make Linux Obsolete?

Remember blogging? Hell, remember magazine publishing? Shouldn't be hard. You're reading some now. Both are still around, but they're obsolete—at least relatively. Two cases in point: my blog and Linux Journal.

Linux Journal May 2017

Doing Big Things I bought a book a few years back titled, Installing Linux on a Dead Badger by Lucy Snyder. When I see that book on my bookshelf, it still makes me chuckle.