Linux Journal

The Single-Board Computers Issue

When I was a child in the 1980s, I had a computer—a very 1980s computer. It had a hefty, rectangular, grey case made of some sort of industrial sheet metal. Two plain (but rather large), square buttons adorned the front, begging to be pressed: "Reset" and "Turbo". On the right side of the case, far in the back (nearly out of reach), sat an almost comically large, red power switch. It was the kind of lever that would look right at home in an action movie—used to cut the electricity to all of New York City.

A Line in the Sand

There's a new side to choose. It helps that each of us is already on it. Linux Journal was born in one fight and grew through a series of others. Our first fight was for freedom. That began in 1993, when Phil Hughes started work toward a free software magazine. The fight for free software was still there when that magazine was born as Linux Journal in April 1994. Then a second fight began. That one was against all forms of closed and proprietary software, including the commercial UNIX variants that Linux would eventually defeat. We got in the fight for open source starting in 1998. (In 2005, I got a ribbon for my own small part in that battle.) And last year, we began our fight against what Shoshana Zuboff calls surveillance capitalism, and Brett Frischmann and Evan Selinger call re-engineering humanity.

January 2019, #294: The Distributions Issue

Do you remember your first distro? The first version of Linux I truly used, for any length of time, was back at the end of the 1990s—in Ye Olden Times, when 56k modems, 3.5" floppies and VGA CRT monitors reigned supreme. Linux itself had been a thing for a number of years by this point—with both SUSE (then known as the gloriously mixed-case and punctuation-filled S.u.S.E.) and Red Hat doing good business supporting it—when I decided to really give this "Free" operating system a try. Because I'm a nerd. And that's what we do.

The High-Performance Computing Issue

Since the dawn of computing, hardware engineers have had one goal that's stood out above all the rest: speed. Sure, computers have many other important qualities (size, power consumption, price and so on), but nothing captures our attention like the never-ending quest for faster hardware (and software to power it). Faster drives. Faster RAM. Faster processors. Speed, speed and more speed. [Insert manly grunting sounds here.] What's the first thing that happens when a new CPU is released? Benchmarks to compare it against the last batch of processors.

Auto-Download Linux Journal Each Month

There's an old saying, "anything worth doing, is worth automating"—or something like that. Downloading and reading Linux Journal always has been worth doing, and now you can automate it with our new autolj script, which you can get here. Follow these few simple steps, and you can be downloading the PDF (or the .epub or the .mobi file) with the greatest of ease each month:

Bryan Lunduke Is New LJ Deputy Editor

Portland, Oregon, October 29, 2018 — Today, Bryan Lunduke announced that he is officially joining the Linux Journal team as "Deputy Editor" of the illustrious — and long-running — Linux magazine.

Our Immodest Ambitions

Some guidance along our road to greatness. In a February 2018 post titled "Worth Saving", I said I'd like Linux Journal to be for technology what The New Yorker is for New York and National Geographic is for geography. In saying this, I meant it should be two things: 1) a magazine readers value enough not to throw away and 2) about much more than what the name says, while staying true to the name as well.

Caption This: May Winner

Winner: Is this what my cardiologist means by I need an echo? —Tom Dison, twitter.com/fretinator Second Place: USBurger —Greg Charnock, twitter.com/gregcharnock7 Third Place: "Alexa, where's the beef?" —Jack, via comment on https://www.linuxjournal.com

An Update on Linux Journal

So many of you have asked how to help Linux Journal continue to be published* for years to come. First, keep the great ideas coming—we all want to continue making Linux Journal 2.0 something special, and we need this community to do it.

Looking for New Writers and Meet Us at SCaLE 16x

If you're interested in writing for us, we want to hear from you—or even better, here's a chance to meet us in person to discuss the possibilities. If you're going to SCaLE16x, grab a beer with tech editor Kyle Rankin (@kylerankin) and talk about LJ writing opportunities at 6:30pm tomorrow (March 9, 2018) at The Yardhouse (300 E Colorado Blvd #220, Pasadena).

Write for Linux Journal!

Participate in the Linux Journal comeback! We are always looking for new writers from the Linux community. If you're interested, please send a brief proposal to write@linuxjournal.com. We're open to all ideas related to Linux, open source and adjacent technologies, but here are just a few topics to help get you started:

The Refactor Factor

Kyle Rankin, Tech Editor, announces our "new" monthly digital publication and describes how you can help the LJ community.

$25k Linux Journalism Fund

Linux Journal's new parent, Private Internet Access, has established a $25k fund to jump-start the next generation of Linux journalism—and to spend it here, where Linux journalism started in 1994.

Happy New Year- Welcome to Linux Journal 2.0!

Talk about a Happy New Year. The reason: it turns out we're not dead. In fact, we're more alive than ever, thanks to a rescue by readers—specifically, by the hackers who run Private Internet Access (PIA) VPN, a London Trust Media company.

[Updated: LJ is back!] Linux Journal Ceases Publication

On January 1, 2018 Linux Journal was saved and brought back to life by a company called London Trust Media, the parent company of Private Internet Access. The comeback issue of Linux Journal has a release date of March 15, 2018. The article below, originally published in early December of 2017, is preserved for history. EOF

So Long, and Thanks for All the Bash

It was the summer of 2007 and I was at Linux World Expo in San Francisco. I had just finished updating the second edition of Knoppix Hacks and in addition to attending the conference I was there to promote it and my other books at the O'Reilly booth. Somehow I got word that Linux Journal was looking for new authors and was holding an event at a nearby bar later that day.