Web Development

Switching to Chrom(ium)

For someone who works with, writes about and teaches cutting-edge technologies, I tend to be a bit of a laggard when adopting new ones. I upgrade my laptop and servers very conservatively.

APIs

If you're creating Web apps, you're designing APIs. Here are some things to keep in mind before you begin.

Drupal Special Edition

As Linux Journal's resident Drupal nerd, I could not be more pleased to bring you this special Drupal issue. Drupal really is everywhere these days, and it's available in more "flavors" than most people in the Open Source community are aware of.

Basic Web Design with Drupal 7

Drupal is one of the most popular and versatile platforms for Web design. It's free, open source and will run on Linux. Early last year, a new version was released (Drupal 7), making it even better with improvements in usability, performance and security. If you've looked at Drupal before, but didn't end up using it, you may want to take another look.

Build Your Own Flickr with Piwigo

In 2006, the family computer on which our digital photographs were stored had a hard drive failure. Because I'm obsessed with backups, it shouldn't have been a big deal, except that my backups had been silently failing for months. Although I certainly learned a lesson about verifying my backups, I also realized it would be nice to have an off-site storage location for our photos.

Call for Articles - Drupal

Are you a Drupal developer anxious to share your knowledge with Linux Journal's audience?  We're currently accepting article proposals for an upcoming special Drupal issue, and we'd love to see your ideas.

An Introduction to Application Development with Catalyst and Perl

Catalyst is the latest in the evolution of open-source Web development frameworks. Written in modern Perl and inspired by many of the projects that came before it, including Ruby on Rails, Catalyst is elegant, powerful and refined. It's a great choice for creating any Web-based application from the simple to the very complex.

Three Ways to Web Server Concurrency

Multiprocessing, multithreading and evented I/O: the trade-offs in Web servers. A Web server needs to support concurrency. The server should service clients in a timely, fair manner to ensure that no client starves because some other client causes the server to hang. Multiprocessing and multithreading, and hybrids of these, are traditional ways to achieve concurrency. Node.js represents another way, one based on system libraries for asynchronous I/O, such as epoll (Linux) and kqueue (FreeBSD). To highlight the trade-offs among the approaches, I have three echo servers written in close-to-the-metal C: a forking_server, a threading_server and a polling_server.

Mercurial - Revision Control Approximated

A short while ago, an article appeared in Linux Journal implying Git was the be-all and end-all of source code revision control systems ("Git—Revision Control Perfected" by Henry Van Styn, August 2011).

Mustache.js

In previous articles, I've looked at a number of uses for JavaScript, on both the server and the client. I hope to continue my exploration of such systems, particularly on the client side, in the coming months.

Your CMS Is Not Your Web Site

A content management system is a centralized repository for your content. A Web site is a composite of decentralized fragments that are assembled on the edge, in just-in-time fashion as the content is being delivered to users. If it's not a Web site, what does a CMS do?

Are You Accessible?

Accessibility to people with disabilities is an important issue in web and software development, and the folks at Knowbility, Inc. would like your input about how to better educate people about accessible technology.