Journalism

When the Problem Is the Story

Linux isn't a story anymore. That's a good thing, but not an interesting one. Let me explain. Journalism's main product is the story. In newsrooms, the three words uttered most often by editors to reporters are "What's the story?" As I was taught by an editor long ago—and as I have found to be true constantly ever since—all stories are about three things:

Will Anything Make Linux Obsolete?

Remember blogging? Hell, remember magazine publishing? Shouldn't be hard. You're reading some now. Both are still around, but they're obsolete—at least relatively. Two cases in point: my blog and Linux Journal.

The Problem with "Content"

Back in the early '00s, John Perry Barlow said "I didn't start hearing about 'content' until the container business felt threatened." Linux Journal was one of those containers—so was every other magazine, newspaper and broadcast station.

Debugging Democracy

You had to be a crank to insist on being right. Being right was largely a matter of explanations. Intellectual man had become an explaining creature. Fathers to children, wives to husbands, lecturers to listeners, experts to laymen, colleagues to colleagues, doctors to patients, man to his own soul, explained.