Weekend Reading: Science

science

Mathematics and science tools often depend on cluster and high performance computing, both undeniably Linux strengths. Couple that with the maturity of the science tools available for Linux and you get a lot of computational bang for your buck. Join us this weekend as we review physics, chemistry, biology, astronomy, and other science programs for Linux.

Open Science Means Open Source--Or, at Least, It Should

Why open source was actually invented in 1665.

Getting Started with Scilab

Introducing one of the larger scientific lab packages for Linux.

A Look at KDE's KAlgebra

This article looks at one of the programs specifically available in the KDE desktop environment, KAlgebra.

Atomic Modeling with GAMGI

General Atomistic Modelling Graphic Interface, or GAMGI, provides a very complete set of tools that allows you to design and visualize fairly complex molecules.

Drawing Feynman Diagrams for Fun and Profit with JaxoDraw

In physics, there's a powerful technique for visualizing particle interactions at the quantum level. This technique uses something called Feynman diagrams, invented by physicist Richard Feynman. These diagrams help visualize what happens when one or more particles have some kind of interaction.

Visualizing Molecules with EasyChem

Introducing EasyChem, a program that generates publication-quality images of molecular structures.

Astronomy Software by Any Other Name

Similar to other larger astronomy programs, you can use SkyChart from the desktop to the observatory.

Modeling the Entire Universe

For this article, I want to look at the largest thing possible, the whole universe. At least, that's the claim made by Celestia, the software package I'm introducing here. 

A Good Front End for R

R is the de facto statistical package in the Open Source world. It's also quickly becoming the default data-analysis tool in many scientific disciplines.

Introducing Spyder, the Scientific PYthon Development EnviRonment

If you want to use Anaconda for science projects, one of the first things to consider is the spyder package, which is included in the basic Anaconda installation. Spyder is short for Scientific PYthon Development EnviRonment. Think of it as an IDE for scientific programming within Python.

Evolving Your Own Life: Introducing Biogenesis

Biogenesis provides a platform where you can create entire ecosystems of lifeforms and see how they interact and how the system as a whole evolves over time.

Emacs for Science

A collection of enhancements and configuration settings are available bundled under the name of scimax. Being an Emacs user myself, I was surprised I'd never heard of it before now. This project has been in development for some time, but it recently has started to find wider attention.

Using Linux for Logic

I take a look at a software package that lets you dive deep down to the level of the logic gates used to build up computational units.

 

 

 

 

Carlie Fairchild is Linux Journal’s Publisher and guiding spirit. She’s been actively engaged in the Linux community for two decades and is responsible for setting the magazine’s overall direction. Carlie leads a motley team of geeks and journalists to ensure that Linux Journal stays true to its founding ideologies of personal freedom and open-source technical innovation. You can contact Carlie via e-mail, publisher@linuxjournal.com.

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