OpenShift, IBM Cloud, Azure, Linux apps on Chrome OS, Twitter, Serious Flaw on AMD and Intel x86 CPUs

Red Hat has been making headlines with the recent announcement that they will be teaming up with IBM to integrate OpenShift (Red Hat’s commercial Kubernetes offering) into IBM’s Cloud to help accelerate container adoption.

 

At the same time, Red Hat expanded beyond IBM and is now also working with Microsoft to provide the same OpenShift platform to Azure.

 

It is now official, Google announced during the Google I/O summit that Project Crostini is making it possible for users to install Linux applications on Chrome OS via DEB files (from Debian Stretch). This is on top of the already integrated support for Android apps.

 

A serious flaw was recently discovered affecting all major operating systems running on AMD and Intel x86 CPUs. The vulnerability was exposed by developers misinterpreting debug documentation provided by the chip manufacturers, which allows an authenticated attacker the ability to read sensitive data in memory and more. These same major operating system are already rolling out patches to address this issue. Be sure to update your distribution.

 

In an effort to increase user security, Twitter may start including an encrypted direct messaging feature for their Android app. This was observed by Jane Manchun Wong as she started to dig through the code.

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Petros Koutoupis, LJ Editor at Large, is currently a senior platform architect at IBM for its Cloud Object Storage division (formerly Cleversafe). He is also the creator and maintainer of the RapidDisk Project. Petros has worked in the data storage industry for well over a decade and has helped pioneer the many technologies unleashed in the wild today.

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Cloud

The cloud has become synonymous with all things data storage. It additionally equates to the many web-centric services accessing that same back-end data storage, but the term also has evolved to mean so much more.