New Intel Chip Exploits Discovered, Instagram Accounts Attacked, Nativ Vita Hi-Res Music Server Has New Features, QEMU 3.0 Now Available and the Debian GNU/Linux Project Turns 25 Tomorrow

News briefs for August 15, 2018.

Three new Meltdown/Spectre-type Intel chip exploits have been discovered that affect Intel's desktop, workstation and server CPUs, and they are especially problematic for containers. ItProToday reports that "The latest exploits might prove to be particularly troublesome for those using containers since each container runs on its own implementation of Linux, which likely means each and every container will need to be patched. According to Red Hat, 'every Linux and Kubernetes distribution is impacted. All organizations deploying containers should consult their Linux/Kubernetes/containers provider.'" See also the Red Hat blog for more information.

Instagram accounts are being attacked—even those using 2FA. Mashable reports that users are being locked out of their accounts, their profile avatars are being changed and bios deleted. Restoring account access is evidently quite difficult.

The open platform Nativ Vita Hi-Res Music Server has been updated, adding serious new functionality, such as multi-room streaming, support of up to 10TB, playing music from a NAS or computer and CD ripping.

QEMU 3.0 is now available. Phoronix reports that this big feature release brings new functionality and several improvements including "Spectre V4 mitigation for x86 Intel/AMD, improved support for nested KVM guests on Microsoft Hyper-V, block device support for active mirroring, improved support for AHCI and SCSI emulation, OpenGL ES support within the SDL front-end, improved latency for user-mode networking, various ARM improvements, some POWER9 / RISC-V / s390 improvements too, and various other new bits." See the QEMU ChangeLog for details.

The Debian GNU/Linux project turns 25 tomorrow. Source: ITWire.

Jill Franklin is an editorial professional with more than 17 years experience in technical and scientific publishing, both print and digital. As Executive Editor of Linux Journal, she wrangles writers, develops content, manages projects, meets deadlines and makes sentences sparkle. She also was Managing Editor for TUX and Embedded Linux Journal, and the book Linux in the Workplace. Before entering the Linux and open-source realm, she was Managing Editor of several scientific and scholarly journals, including Veterinary Pathology, The Journal of Mammalogy, Toxicologic Pathology and The Journal of Scientific Exploration. In a previous life, she taught English literature and composition, managed a bookstore and tended bar. When she’s not bugging writers about deadlines or editing copy, she throws pots, gardens and reads. You can contact Jill via e-mail, ljeditor@linuxjournal.com.

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