GNOME 3.30.2 Released, Braiins OS Open-Source System for Cryptocurrency Embedded Devices Launched, Ubuntu 19.04 Dubbed Disco Dingo, Project OWL Wins IBM's Call for Code Challenge and Google Announces New Security Features

News briefs for November 1, 2018.

GNOME 3.30.2 was released yesterday. It includes several bug fixes, and packages should arrive in your distro of choice soon, but if you want to compile it yourself, you can get it here. The full list of changes is available here. This is the last planned point release of the 3.30 desktop environment. The 3.32 release is expected to be available in spring 2019.

Braiins Systems has announced Braiins OS, which claims to be "the first fully open source system for cryptocurrency embedded devices". FOSSBYTES reports that the initial release is based on OpenWrt. In addition, Braiins OS "keeps monitoring the working conditions and hardware to create reports of errors and performance. Braiins also claimed to reduce power consumption by 20%".

Ubuntu 19.04 will be called Disco Dingo, and the release is scheduled for April 2019. Source: OMG! Ubuntu!.

IBM announces Project OWL is the winner of its first Call for Code challenge. Project OWL is "an IoT and software solution that keeps first responders and victims connected in a natural disaster". The team will receive $200,000 USD and will be able to deploy the solution via the IBM Corporate Service Corps. The OWL stands for "stands for Organization, Whereabouts, and Logistics", and it's a hardware/software solution that "provides an offline communication infrastructure that gives first responders a simple interface for managing all aspects of a disaster".

Google yesterday announced four new security features for Google accounts. According to ZDNet, Google won't allow you to sign in if you have disabled JavaScript in your browser. It plans to pull data from Google Play Protect to list all malicious apps installed on Android phones, and it also now will notify you whenever you share any data from your Google account. Finally, it has implemented a new set of procedures to help users after an account has been attacked.

Jill Franklin is an editorial professional with more than 17 years experience in technical and scientific publishing, both print and digital. As Executive Editor of Linux Journal, she wrangles writers, develops content, manages projects, meets deadlines and makes sentences sparkle. She also was Managing Editor for TUX and Embedded Linux Journal, and the book Linux in the Workplace. Before entering the Linux and open-source realm, she was Managing Editor of several scientific and scholarly journals, including Veterinary Pathology, The Journal of Mammalogy, Toxicologic Pathology and The Journal of Scientific Exploration. In a previous life, she taught English literature and composition, managed a bookstore and tended bar. When she’s not bugging writers about deadlines or editing copy, she throws pots, gardens and reads. You can contact Jill via e-mail, ljeditor@linuxjournal.com.

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