Dropbox for Linux

FAIL (the browser should render some flash content, not this).

Dropbox for free, cross-platform online storage.

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Refferal

Philip's picture

If you sign up for dropbox by clicking the link Here 250mb will be added to both of our accounts plus the standard 2gigs. We both win!

cool utility

Tuxly_Tuxford_McTuxtington's picture

Thanks, LJ, for the heads-up on Dropbox! I had not heard of this before you did this piece on it. I've had it for a few days now and am loving it. The forums at Getdropbox.com are hopping, and the linux community there is pretty active. It seems like the kind of place where the developers really listen to the community. Great stuff! And the integration into Nautilus and the taskbar is fantastic!!

I forgot to mention that there's a short workaround to getting it working under Jaunty, which should be fixed by the time Jaunty's actually released. :)

Dropbox fo' life

jacksinn's picture

I use Dropbox on a daily basis. I use a computer at work, one at my startup, and multiple computers at home - all with different flavors of Linux and even a Windows machine. It's comforting that I can go to any one of the machines and fire up Eclipse and continue working on the same project or have my favorite music files there. I've seriously considered upgrading so I can use them for most of my storage and not ever having to worry about syncing anything again.
A friend of mine did have trouble with it in Kubuntu but it runs fine in Ubuntu and Gnome Fedora.

A more flexible solution would be rsync.net

slu's picture

I've been using rsync.net for a while now.

As the name implies you can rsync your files/directories. There's also support for ssh+svn, which means you can host your own subversion repositories. Works nicly across platforms too. It's obviously not as simple to setup as Dropbox, but if you're used to scripting/ssh/rsync, it's very nice. It's not a free services, though. But pricing is reasonable, and you can increase your quota at any time (it only to 30 minutes, when I last asked for an increase.)

But I think I will "give" a Dropbox account to my wife ;-)

dropbox

lduvall's picture

I don't know the security issues that may exist, but dropbox is definitely convenient - I just encrypt that which I want to be private before sending it to dropbox.

Nice service

adam's picture

Dropbox is pretty great. Such a seamless implementation. And it's always nice to see Linux software that's just as good as the Mac/Windows builds.

Additional info!

Zoot's picture

Don't forget- if you use the referral links to add other people to Dropbox, they give you a couple hundred extra megabytes of space for each person you refer.
Also, if you can create shared folders with anyone who is a Dropbox member, and the shared folders automatically sync up. Also, the dropbox website gives you the ability to access previous versions of your files by looking at the revision history of files in your dropbox, as well as having the ability to undelete deleted files. I recently set up several dropbox accounts at a non-profit summer camp as a means of communicating program information and files amongst leadership staff. It is a very cool service.

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