Subscriber Discussion

Elephant in the LJ room

The elephant in the room for LJ's FAQ for the move to digital-only is the question:

"I do not wish to (or simply cannot) receive the digital version of LJ. I paid for a product that LJ is now unwilling to provide under the terms of our subscription contract whereby I gives you money, you gives me magazine. Can you refund the balance of my subscription?" more>>

I don't mind a Digital Edition as long as the page layout works

Double column page layouts do not work on any eReader device I have. WAY TO MUCH SCROLLING. This is why I don't like the current .PDF's of the issues.

If you are going all digital I would expect to see single column pages optimized for a digital reader, not for a printed page. I don't want to have to download another 'app' just so I can view your content. more>>

Has anyone received their September issue?

According to this article by Carlie Fairchild, "For our current print subscribers: if we have your current e-mail address on file, there is nothing more for you to do. The September issue of Linux Journal will arrive in your inbox today, August 19." Well, it's the 22nd today and I have yet to receive mine. more>>

Monster font size gives me extra pages for free!

I think I lucked out by getting the large-print edition!

LinkedIn Poll

Vote on this here. Maybe if the LJ staff sees a graph of their reader's opinions they will realize how wrong the are. http://www.linkedin.com/osview/canvas?_ch_page_id=1&_ch_panel_id=1&_ch_app_id=1900&_applicationId=1900&_ownerId=0&appParams={%22section%22:%22vote%22,%22poll_id%22:146343}&trk=twitter-polls-create-vote

What a pity!

I'll miss the print copy of my LJ....!

I was always happy to get the new copy out of my mailbox.

I always liked to read the magazine on my way from and to work. Since i dont want to fiddle around with my netbook on the train, and i also dont want to buy a fancy I-Pod, its a great loss for me. Printing out everything is not a good idea after all... more>>

"drastic increases in printing costs"

The subject line comes from the announcement of the "no print LJ" email.

I have heard this time and time again.....

But I can't understand it!

I can understand "Per copy cost increases due to smaller print runs".

Sort of. more>>

Why why why would you kill such a nice magazine

This is ridiculous, why would I want to pay $30 for a digital subscription. I can already view practically all the issues online (all but the last 2). So why would I want to pay to get some silly pdf file which will likely still be full of ads. I hope you rethink this decision since I certainly was not aware of this change until the decision had already been made. more>>

Going digital is fine but the formats are a joke

PDF is a bad imitation of a print magazine. Now the non-existent print magazine. PDF has never been a proper digital format for delivering the magazine. Yes, I have the PDF’s stored but have I ever read a single article form them? No. more>>

love the digital! pdf whole year?

Ok got stacks of linux journal lying around and thought hey if the robots take over, and we lose power, I will have something for kindling. I usually buy the cd with the back issues on it which goes back many years. Any thoughts of back issues for this year perhaps pdf the entire 2011 run?

Digital ? I want my print.

I already spend an obscene amount of time staring at the screen - not going to stare any more then absolutely necessary. digital can never truly replace paper format. Hardcopy won't die out like many believe. I like hardcopy because I can take it wherever I go even if is out somewhere with no electricity etc. more>>

Going all Digital isn't all bad ;)

I figured I should put in a topic for supportive comments as well ;)

While I am not a huge fan of reading a magazine in digital form. Digital format is ok if:

1) We can always get access to the PDF. 2) At some point soon other formats will be supported (for kindles, etc) more>>

Why does an American magazine, distributed world wide, have problems with printing?

I ask this because I live in Belgium, one of the smallest countries in Europe. In fact some magazines here do not even reach half the population, being either printed in Dutch or French. Some magazines here are possibly even more specific than Linux Journal, e.g. Elektuur (Elektor), printed in Dutch (ok, the market base here is 6 mio Flemish + 15 mio Holland, but even then). more>>

Interesting article by Doc Searls

I just read the article by Doc Searls in the [now digital-only] September issue. It actually gave me a better understanding of the challenges Linux Journal has faced, leading up to its decision to dump the print version. (Still not happy about that, though.) more>>

Bad move to cancel hardcopy editions

The Linux Journal has been one of my favourite magazines for at least a decade, and I read, keep, and reread the articles many times over.

I purposely subscribe to the hard-copy edition, because digital magazines are usually poorly formatted for reading on monitors and portable devices, cannot be read on the john, more>>

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