Audio/Video

xbmc

Interview with Cory Fields of XBMC

I recently had the honor of spending time with Cory Fields, the Public / Business Relations Manger for XBMC. XBMC is the premier free and open source, cross-platform home entertainment system. XBMC was originally created for the first-generation Xbox, but has evolved to now be primarily available for Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows. more>>

Making chapter points in a video is easy with Bombono DVD.

Bombono DVD—Open-Source DVD Authoring Software

Bombono is a simple to use DVD authoring program that doesn't have the steep learning curve of many others in its field. Or in the words of the Web site: “Bombono DVD is a DVD authoring program for Linux. It is easy to use and has nice and clean GUI (Gtk).”

Also from the Web site, the main features of Bombono DVD are: more>>

Crafting Digital Media book

Crafting Digital Media: A Book Review

I don't usually write book reviews, but this one is special. My friend and colleague Daniel James has written an introduction to the world of media production with Linux, or as the subtitle describes it, "A manual for creative media on a modest budget". I'll put the spoiler right up front: This book is wonderful and is an essential read for all artistically-inclined Linux users. Read on to find out why I think so. more>>

Linux audio

Linux Audio Plugin Update

Audio processing and synthesis plugins are always a lively topic for musicians. Many contemporary music-makers rely completely upon their plugin collection for all their sound sources and processing routines, and it is not at all uncommon to discover that some of these composers have never learned to play a traditional instrument. However you feel about audio plugins they are a fact of life in modern music production. more>>

The Gifting Season: Linux Audio For The Holidays

During the final months of 2009 Linux audio developers and users were working overtime. If you feel that you didn't get enough goodies in your holiday stocking perhaps you'll find a few more stuffers listed here as another year closes in the world of Linux sound and music software. more>>

OpenMovieEditor And Blender: More NLE Delights

We're getting close to the last stops on our tour of non-linear video editors (a.k.a. NLEs) for Linux. This week I've focused my attention on two editors, both of which surprised me in many ways. more>>

The CinelerraCV Project

Continuing my tour of Linux-based video editors this week I've profiled Cinelerra. Specifically I've reviewed the community-supported version produced by the CinelerraCV project. more>>

Introducing OpenShot

As promised, I've continued to research and test desktop video editors for Linux. This week we'll look at OpenShot, a GTK-based project. more>>

Tech Tip: Save an Online Video with your Browser (no extensions needed)

Sometimes when you're watching online videos on youtube or other sites, you want to save some of them for later offline playback. You've probably heard of Firefox extensions like DownloadHeloper that can do this, but sometimes you may only have a bare version of Firefox, or perhaps a different browser, one that doesn't have a plugin for doing this. Using the tip below, you can save videos no matter what browser you're using. more>>

Three For O

The O is for October, harvest time here in NW Ohio USA. A beat-slicer, a book review, and a milestone release compose this trio of reviews for the Fall season in Linux audio fashion. more>>

Kdenlive Meets Studio Dave

Over the past few months I've been drifting into the world of Linux video applications and development. I've already written a review of the LiVES video editor, and I've made occasional reference to the Kino editor. Recently a reader asked if I'd tried a recent version of Kdenlive. I started looking into it and I liked what I saw. The following article is an account of my continuing experience with the latest codebase from the project. more>>

Surfing The Forge: Sound & MIDI Projects On SourceForge

When I began collecting links for the Linux Sound & Music Applications pages I frequented a variety of announcement and news services. Some of those services are no longer with us, some have been superceded by more comprehensive and modern channels, and a few have remained as primary sources for new and updated Linux audio software. SourceForge is one of those long-lived services that have remained relevant to my searches for new and interesting sound and music applications, so I decided to surf the Forge to find recent and maybe some not-so-recent developments in the world of Linux audio. more>>

Building Linux Audio Applications 101: A User's Guide, Part 2

In this article I finish the process we started in the last episode. Read on for the thrilling denouement.

The Build

After all the preparation described in the first part of this article the build process itself is rather anticlimactic. Building from sources with the GNU autotools is this easy : more>>

Building Linux Audio Applications 101: A User's Guide, Part 1

Recently I've received some mail asking for a brief explanation on how to build Linux audio applications from source code packages. Ask and ye shall receive, hence the following simple guide for the perplexed, the puzzled, and the downright mystified. Compiling software is hardly rocket science, and if an old guitar-picker like myself can do it certainly you can too. more>>

Introducing Guitarix

According to its developers Guitarix is a monaural amplifier designed for creating the distorted sounds typical of thrash, heavy metal, blues, and other rock guitar styles. In fact, Guitarix is capable of much more than distortion sounds. In this article I'll remove the software speaker grill and pull out the virtual chassis to take a closer look at the sonic possibilities of this "simple mono amplifier". more>>

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