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Updates from LinuxCon and ContainerCon, Toronto, August 2016

The Future of Linux: Continuing to Inspire Innovation and Openness

The first 25 years of Linux has transformed the world, not just computing, and the next 25 years will continue to see more growth in the Open Source movement, The Linux Foundation Executive Director Jim Zemlin said during the opening keynote of LinuxCon/ContainerCon in Toronto on Monday, August 22, 2016. more>>

A New Project for Linux at 25

John McPhee says his books on geology could all be compressed to a single statement: the summit of Mt. Everest is marine limestone. We can do the same for Linux with this one: microsoft.com is hosted on Linux. more>>

Doing for User Space What We Did for Kernel Space

I believe the best and worst thing about Linux is its hard distinction between kernel space and user space. more>>

What's Our Next Fight?

We won the battle for Linux, but we're losing the battle for freedom.

Linux turns 25 in August 2016. Linux Journal turned 21 in April 2016. (Issue #1 was April 1994, the month Linux hit version 1.0.) We're a generation into the history of our cause, but the fight isn't there anymore, because we won. Our cause has achieved its effects. more>>

Ubuntu Online Summit

There's a fundamental difference between conferences for community-driven projects and closed-source commercial software. more>>

The US Government and Open-Source Software

As part of the "Second Open Government National Action Plan", the federal government is planning to share the source code behind many of its software projects. more>>

Are You Doing Something Extraordinary with Linux?

Every month, Linux Journal features a person doing interesting or extraordinary things using Linux. Are you that person? Leave us a comment here. (Tell us a little about what you're doing. more>>

What's the Kernel Space of Democracy?

No one pretends that democracy is perfect or all-wise. Indeed, it has been said that democracy is the worst form of government except all those other forms that have been tried from time to time.—Winston Churchill more>>

To Appreciate a Life

Over dinner a few years ago, Kevin Kelly told me neither of us would be remembered a thousand years from now—nor would our work, even though we both (especially he) enjoyed a measure of celebrity, our bylines on books and magazine mastheads. Death, rot and other forms of change would erase nearly everybody while altering nearly everything. more>>

LinuxQuestions.org: Not Your Average Linux Forum

For many of us, our introduction to computing is being placed in front of a machine where the only challenge is figuring out the Windows user experience paradigm. Getting started with Linux, on the other hand, requires a bit more effort, a fair amount of trial and error, and perhaps some colorful language along the way. more>>

Reglue: Opening Up the World to Deserving Kids, One Linux Computer at a Time

They say you never forget your first computer. For some of us, it was a Commodore 64 or an Apple IIe. For others, it was a Pentium 233 running Windows 95. Regardless of the hardware, the fond memories of wonder and excitement are universal. For me, I'll never forget the night my father brought home our first computer, a Tandy 1000. more>>

Wanted - Free Software Enthusiasts in Puerto Rico

Imagine what Puerto Rico would be like, if free software could become a movement for social justice on the island. Well, on Tuesday, February 11th, 2014, the Institute for a Free Puerto Rico planted the seed for this movement. more>>

Puerto Rico Python User Group Celebrates First Anniversary

One year ago the Puerto Rico Python Interest Group (prPIG) was founded on one purpose; to create a sustainable user community based on software development in Puerto Rico. On February 20, 2014 we will celebrate our first anniversary with an open format meeting with lightning talks from the community. more>>

Girls and Software

December 2013's EOF, titled "Mars Needs Women", visited an interesting fact: that the male/female ratio among Linux Journal readers, and Linux kernel developers, is so lopsided (male high, female low) that graphing it would produce a near-vertical line. more>>

Mars Needs Women

Linux is pretty much an all-male project. Let's change that. more>>

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