Security

Nmap—Not Just for Evil!

If SSH is the Swiss Army knife of the system administration world, Nmap is a box of dynamite. It's really easy to misuse dynamite and blow your foot off, but it's also a very powerful tool that can do jobs that are impossible without it. more>>

Real-Time Rogue Wireless Access Point Detection with the Raspberry Pi

Years ago, I worked for an automotive IT provider, and occasionally we went out to the plants to search for rogue Wireless Access Points (WAPs). A rogue WAP is one that the company hasn't approved to be there. So if someone were to go and buy a wireless router, and plug it in to the network, that would be a rogue WAP. more>>

Sharing Admin Privileges for Many Hosts Securely

The problem: you have a large team of admins, with a substantial turnover rate. Maybe contractors come and go. Maybe you have tiers of access, due to restrictions based on geography, admin level or even citizenship (as with some US government contracts). more>>

January 2015 Issue of Linux Journal: Security

Security: a Method, Not a Goal

The Security issue of Linux Journal always makes me feel a little guilty. It turns out that although I have a fairly wide set of technology skills, I'm not the person you want in charge of securing your network or your systems. By default, Linux is designed with a moderate amount of security in mind. For that, I am incredibly grateful. more>>

Readers' Choice Awards 2014

It's time for another Readers' Choice issue of Linux Journal! The format last year was well received, so we've followed suit making your voices heard loud again. I couldn't help but add some commentary in a few places, but for the most part, we just reported results. Please enjoy this year's Readers' Choice Awards! more>>

The Awesome Program You Never Should Use

I've been hesitating for a couple months about whether to mention sshpass. Conceptually, it's a horrible, horrible program. It basically allows you to enter an SSH user name and password on the command line, so you can create a connection without any interaction. A far better way to accomplish that is with public/private keypairs. more>>

Big Bad Data

Obsession with Big Data has gotten out of hand. Here's how. more>>

Encrypt Your Dog (Mutt and GPG)

I have been focusing a lot on security and privacy issues in this year's columns so far, but I realize some of you may expect a different kind of topic from me (or maybe are just tired of all this security talk). Well, you are in luck. more>>

New Products

Please send information about releases of Linux-related products to newproducts@linuxjournal.com or New Products c/o Linux Journal, PO Box 980985, Houston, TX 77098. Submissions are edited for length and content.

Security Hardening with Ansible

Ansible is an open-source automation tool developed and released by Michael DeHaan and others in 2012. DeHaan calls it a "general-purpose automation pipeline" (see Resources for a link to the article "Ansible's Architecture: Beyond Configuration Management"). more>>

Linux Security Threats on the Rise

Every year, heck...every month, Linux is adopted by more companies and organizations as an important if not primary component of their enterprise platform. And the more serious the hardware platform, the more likely it is to be running Linux. 60% of servers, 70% of Web servers and 95% of all supercomputers are Linux-based! more>>

Tails above the Rest, Part III

In my first two columns in this series, I gave an overview of Tails, including how to get the distribution securely, and once you have it, how to use some of the basic tools. more>>

Tails above the Rest, Part II

Now that you have Tails installed, let's start using it. more>>

Tails logo

Tails above the Rest: the Installation

A few columns ago, I started a series aimed at helping everyone improve their privacy and security on the Internet. The first column in this series was an updated version of a Tor column I wrote a few years ago. more>>

Non-Linux FOSS: My Portable Windows Lab

Portable apps aren't anything new. There are variations of "single executable apps" for most platforms, and some people swear by keeping their own applications with them for use when away from home. I don't usually do that, as most of what I do is on-line, but there is one exception: security. more>>

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