Security

January 2014 Issue of Linux Journal: Security

Lapsang Souchong!

Back when we were kids, "security" meant little more than having a secret password to keep little siblings out of the treehouse. more>>

Readers' Choice Awards 2013

This year's Reader's Choice issue was truly fun to put together. No, not just because you do all the work (voting), but because it's great to get a feel for what our community is buzzing about. Based on your feedback, we've given you all the data again this year, with percentages and rankings, plus we tried to include as many of your less-popular responses as possible. more>>

Web Administration Scripts

During the past month or so, I've also been dealing with an aggressive DDOS (that's a "distributed denial of service") attack on my server, one that's been a huge pain, as you might expect. What's odd is that with multiple domains on the same server, it's one of my less-popular sites that seems to have been the target of the attacks. more>>

Surf Safely with sshuttle

In past articles, I've explained how to set up a SOCKS proxy with SSH. I've demonstrated how to tunnel traffic with SSH. I've even shown how to circumvent a company firewall with SSH. I've never been able to use SSH completely as a VPN, however, and that's always bummed me out—until I discovered sshuttle. more>>

Web Security

As I write these words, many Ruby on Rails developers are worried. more>>

password image

The Secret Password Is...

If your password is as easy as 123, we need to talk. more>>

Government: Using an Open Source Framework to Catch the Bad Guy

Every security policy provides guidance and requirements for ensuring adequate protection of information and data, as well as high-level technical and administrative security requirements for a system in a given environment. Traditionally, providing security for a system focuses on the confidentiality of the information on it. more>>

Elliptic Curve Cryptography

When it comes to public key cryptography, most systems today are still stuck in the 1970s. On December 14, 1977, two events occurred that would change the world: Paramount Pictures released Saturday Night Fever, and MIT filed the patent for RSA. more>>

Wi-Fi Mini Honeypot

Do you have an old, unused wireless router collecting dust? Have some fun and make a Wi-Fi honeypot with it! more>>

Configuring One-Time Password Authentication with OTPW

Password authentication contains a lot of assumptions about security and trust. Encrypted SSH tunnels and public key verification are two common ways to ensure that your password is not compromised in transit. But, what if it's the computer you're currently typing on that can't be trusted? more>>

Crashplan, the Only Reason I Install Java

I'm the sort of person who doesn't like to install Java. I actually don't like to install Flash either, but it's still tough to survive browsing the Internet without Flash installed. There is one program that makes me break my own rules, however, and that's Crashplan. more>>

January 2013 Issue of Linux Journal: Security

Sticky Note of Doom

Years ago, I had the brilliant idea that all my users in the finance department should have complex passwords. This made perfect sense to everyone, since dealing with millions of dollars of revenue is something that should be secured. So, the passwords were changed with complexity requirements enforced. I slept better that night knowing our paychecks were no longer secured by passwords like "mustang" or "mrwhiskers".

more>>

Tarsnap: On-line Backups for the Truly Paranoid

Storing backups in the cloud requires a level of trust that not everyone is willing to give. While the convenience and low cost of automated, off-site backups is very compelling, the reality of putting personal data in the hands of complete strangers will never sit quite right with some people. more>>

KeePassX Logo

KeePassX: Keeping Your Passwords Safe

For a long time, my password tracking system was quite simplistic: hope I remembered the right passwords for each site or record them in an ordinary word-processor document. Such methods obviously have great flaws. I might have a hard time remembering a password for an infrequently used site, and a word-processor document isn't the most secure place to store passwords. more>>

Hack and / - Password Cracking with GPUs, Part III: Tune Your Attack

You've built the hardware, installed the software and cracked some passwords. Now find out how to fine-tune your attacks. more>>

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