Privacy

Tor 0.2.8.6 Is Released

The latest version of the Tor project was released this week, offering greater security and anonymity to individuals and organizations. Here's why you should care. more>>

Doing for User Space What We Did for Kernel Space

I believe the best and worst thing about Linux is its hard distinction between kernel space and user space. more>>

What's Our Next Fight?

We won the battle for Linux, but we're losing the battle for freedom.

Linux turns 25 in August 2016. Linux Journal turned 21 in April 2016. (Issue #1 was April 1994, the month Linux hit version 1.0.) We're a generation into the history of our cause, but the fight isn't there anymore, because we won. Our cause has achieved its effects. more>>

Google's Abacus Project: It's All about Trust

Do you hate having to remember your password when you want to access a secure Web site? Well, that soon may be a thing of the past. more>>

The FBI and the Mozilla Foundation Lock Horns over Known Security Hole

The Mozilla Foundation and the FBI recently have clashed over security weaknesses. The FBI is aware of a weakness in the Tor browser that may affect Firefox—it's a weakness the FBI has exploited during an investigation. more>>

Privacy and the New Math

Among the countless essays and posts I've read on the fight over crypto that's been going on between Apple and the FBI, one by the title above by T.Rob Wyatt in Medium stood out so well that I asked if he'd like to help me adapt it into an article for Linux Jou more>>

Open-Source Project Secretly Funded by CIA

It's fair to say that the interests of governments and the FOSS community are not always aligned. more>>

Protection, Privacy and Playoffs

I'm not generally a privacy nut when it comes to my digital life. That's not really a good thing, as I think privacy is important, but it often can be very inconvenient. For example, if you strolled into my home office, you'd find I don't password-protect my screensaver. more>>

Dealing with Boundary Issues

The other evening a bunch of us were sitting in a friend's living room while a series of photos scrolled across her TV. The photos were a screen saver served up by her new Apple TV box. Some of the pictures were of people, birds, flowers, cats and other typical stuff. more>>

Privacy Is Personal

Try to nail two boards together with your bare hands.

Can't be done. You need a hammer. But the power is not the hammer's. It's yours, because the hammer is your tool. As a tool, it becomes part of you. That's what tools do: they enlarge your capacity for action and effect.

That capacity is called agency. To have agency is to operate with effect in the world. more>>

A Machine for Keeping Secrets?

[I can't begin to describe all the things Vinay Gupta does. Fortunately, he does, at http://re.silience.com. more>>

Consent That Goes Both Ways

Whatever your opinions about Do Not Track, set them aside for a minute and just look at what the words say and who says them. Individuals—the people we call "users" (you know, like with drugs)—are the ones saying it. In grammatical terms, "do not track" is spoken in the first person. more>>

Stuff That Matters

I'm writing this in a hotel room entered through two doors. The hall door is the normal kind: you stick a card in a slot, a light turns green, and the door unlocks. The inner one is three inches thick, has no lock and serves a single purpose: protection from an explosion. more>>

Dolphins in the NSA Dragnet

There's an old quote from Jamie Zawinkski that goes: "Some people, when confronted with a problem, think ‘I know, I'll use regular expressions.’ Now they have two problems." Even people like me who like regular expressions laugh at the truth in that quote, because we've seen the consequences when someone doesn't think through the implications of a poorly written pattern. When some people write a bad pattern, they end up with extra lines in a log file. When the NSA does it, they capture and retain Internet traffic on untold numbers of innocent people. more>>

A Bundle of Tor

I don't know how many readers know this, but my very first Linux Journal column ("Browse the Web without a Trace", January 2008) was about how to set up and use Tor. Anonymity and privacy on the Internet certainly take on a different meaning in the modern era of privacy-invading software and general Internet surveillance. more>>

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