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Hodge Podge

For every article, I try to write something that is interesting, entertaining, educational and fun. Sometimes I even succeed. Many other times I have some things I'd like to talk about, but there's not enough of it to fill the space. This time, I decided a disjointed hodge podge would be the theme. So let's just have a virtual nerdy talk about stuff, shall we? more>>

NETGEAR, Inc.'s GSS108EPP and GS408EPP Switches

Two new NETGEAR, Inc., Power-Over-Ethernet (PoE) switches feature a novel "Virtually Anywhere" mounting system that delivers modern high-power PoE+ to devices that others cannot. more>>

TRENDnet's WiFi Everywhere Powerline 1200 AV2 Access Point, Model TPL-430AP

TRENDnet recently released an innovative new solution that creates dead-spot-free home Wi-Fi by leveraging a home's existing electrical system. more>>

Understanding Firewalld in Multi-Zone Configurations

Stories of compromised servers and data theft fill today's news. It isn't difficult for someone who has read an informative blog post to access a system via a misconfigured service, take advantage of a recently exposed vulnerability or gain control using a stolen password. more>>

SNMP

How would you find out how much RAM is free on your Linux desktop? That's a really easy question with a lot of answers—free, any of the implementations of top and Glances all are valid responses. more>>

Papa's Got a Brand New NAS

It used to be that the true sign you were dealing with a Linux geek was the pile of computers lying around that person's house. How else could you experiment with networked servers without a mass of computers and networking equipment? If you work as a sysadmin for a large company, sometimes one of the job perks is that you get first dibs on decommissioned equipment. more>>

Applied Expert Systems, Inc.'s CleverView for TCP/IP on Linux

One of the most important characteristics of the contemporary data center, notes Applied Expert Systems, Inc. (AES), is that an ever-increasing amount of the traffic is between servers. Realizing the resulting need to facilitate improved server-to-server communications, AES developed CleverView for TCP/IP on Linux v2.5 with KVM Monitoring. more>>

The Tiny Internet Project, Part III

In a previous article, I introduced the Tiny Internet Project, a self-contained Linux project that shows you how to build key pieces of the internet on a single computer using virtualization software, a router and free open-source applications. more>>

Pancaking the Pyramid Economy

In 1937, Ronald Coase gave economics something new: a theory for why companies should exist. Oddly, this hadn't come up before. more>>

A New Mental Model for Computers and Networks

One of the great works of geekdom is Neal Stephenson's In the Beginning Was the Command Line, an essay-length book that came out in 1999. As with Linux, the code was open. Still is. more>>

The Peculiar Case of Email in the Cloud

Most of the time when I start a project, or spin up a virtual server, it's done in my own basement "server farm". Not too many years ago, if I wanted those services to be public, I'd simply port-forward from my static IP into my personal machines. Or, perhaps I'd set up a name-based virtual host as a reverse proxy if I needed to expose a Web app. more>>

The Tiny Internet Project, Part I

As LJ readers well know, Linux drives many of the technologies we use every day, from smart TVs to Web servers. Linux is everywhere—except most homes and classrooms. more>>

Hugh MacLeod's illustration of the Internet

The Giant Zero, Part 0.x

The first time I floated the "giant zero" metaphor for the Internet, was in my October 2007 "SuitWatch" newsletter for Linux Journal. more>>

What's Our Next Fight?

We won the battle for Linux, but we're losing the battle for freedom.

Linux turns 25 in August 2016. Linux Journal turned 21 in April 2016. (Issue #1 was April 1994, the month Linux hit version 1.0.) We're a generation into the history of our cause, but the fight isn't there anymore, because we won. Our cause has achieved its effects. more>>

OpenSwitch Finds a New Home

OpenSwitch has joined the Linux Foundation's stable of networking projects. This is a significant step. It means the network operating system's development will be driven by community needs, instead of the needs of few private companies. more>>

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