kernel

Linux Kernel Testing and Debugging

Linux Kernel Testing Philosophy

Testing is an integral and important part of any software development cycle, open or closed, and Linux kernel is no exception to that. more>>

diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development

David Herrmann wanted to disable the virtual terminal subsystem in order to save space on a kernel that didn't need a VT. But, he still wanted to see kernel oops output for debugging purposes. The problem was that only the VT subsystem would display oops output—and he'd just disabled it. more>>

New Products

Please send information about releases of Linux-related products to newproducts at linuxjournal.com or New Products c/o Linux Journal, PO Box 980985, Houston, TX 77098. Submissions are edited for length and content.

Linux Kernel News - January and February 2014

I am reporting the Linux project activity for the past two months in this article. Blame it on me being heads down to get some development work done. Without further ado, let's get started on catching up. more>>

Linux Kernel News - December 2013

Mainline Release (Linus's tree) News

The last 3.13 release candidate for 2013 came out on December 29th. This 3.13-rc6 is small with just 81 commits to infiniband, gpu, cpufreq, libata, and block drivers in addition to a few small filesystem fixes, and ARM SoC related changes. more>>

A Handy U-Boot Trick

Embedded developers working on kernels or bare-metal programs often go through several development cycles. Each time the developer modifies the code, the code has to be compiled, the ELF (Executable and Linkable Format)/kernel image has to be copied onto the SD card, and the card then has to be transferred from the PC to the development board and rebooted. more>>

Linux Kernel News - November 2013

Mainline Release (Linus's tree) News

3.13-rc2 has been released on November 29th. This release candidate includes several small bug fixes. Please read the 3.13-rc2 release announcement. more>>

Linux Kernel News - October 2013

Mainline Release (Linus's tree) News

Linus Torvalds released 3.12 on November 3 2013 after seven 3.12 rc cycles. This time around, instead of opening the merge window right after the release, Linus chose to delay it by a week. The 3.13 merge window will be open on November 10th. In this release announcement, Linus started a discussion on bug-fix only 4.0 idea. more>>

Bug-Free Linux 4.0?

Well, let’s not get ahead of ourselves here, but Linux founder and “keeper of the flame”, Linus Torvalds, has put developers and the rest of the world on notice that a Linux 4.0 is coming sooner rather than later, “I don't want us to get to the kinds of crazy numbers we had in the 2.x series, so at some point we're going to cut over from 3.x to 4.x, just to keep the numbers small and easy to more>>

September 2013 Linux Kernel News

Mainline Release (Linus's tree) News

Linus Torvalds closed the 3.12 merge window when he released 3.12-rc1. tty layer and scalability improvements received a special mention in the release announcement. The tty layer cleanups lead to per-tty locking which will result in better performance on some work-loads. more>>

August 2013 Linux Kernel News

Linus Torvalds released 3.11. Prior to 3.11 release, Linus's 3.11-rc7 announcement was posted to his Google Plus page on Linux's 22nd birthday. Here is what he had to say in his nostalgic and reminiscent statement of the passing of time in which so much has been accomplished.

"Hello everybody out there using Linux - more>>

Linux Kernel News - July 2013

The Linux kernel community is busy integrating and testing 3.11 content, working on 3.12 development, and finalizing the topic agenda for the upcoming Linux Conference Europe and Kernel Summit that are scheduled to be held in Edinburgh, UK from October 21-23 2013. Let's start with the release news. more>>

Linux Kernel News - June 2013

As always the Linux kernel community has been busy moving the Linux mainline to another finish line and the stable and extended releases to the next bump in their revisions to fix security and bug fixes. It is a steady and methodical evolution process which is intriguing to follow. Here is my take on the happenings in the Linux kernel world during June 2013. more>>

Kbuild: the Linux Kernel Build System

One amazing thing about Linux is that the same code base is used for a different range of computing systems, from supercomputers to very tiny embedded devices. If you stop for a second and think about it, Linux is probably the only OS that has a unified code base. more>>

Torvalds Christens The Next Linux Kernel Series 3.x

It's official, kernel version 3.0 is on its way. Linus confirmed this both in an announcement and by checking in the first 3.0 release candidate. The new branch is not expected to include any major milestones in terms of features, but it may stimulate developers to adopt policies of cruft removal and modernization. more>>

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