HOWTOs

Tails above the Rest, Part II

Now that you have Tails installed, let's start using it. more>>

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Tails above the Rest: the Installation

A few columns ago, I started a series aimed at helping everyone improve their privacy and security on the Internet. The first column in this series was an updated version of a Tor column I wrote a few years ago. more>>

Super Pi Brothers

I don't game as much as I used to. Although I've certainly spent countless hours of my life in front of a Nintendo, SNES, or after that, playing a first-person shooter on my computer (Linux only, thank you), these days, my free time tends to go toward one of the many nongaming hobbies I've accumulated. more>>

Debugging Web Sites

I know, I'm in the middle of a series of columns about how to work with ImageMagick on the command line, but when other things arise, well, I imagine that a lot of you are somehow involved in the management of servers or systems, so you all understand firefighting. more>>

BirdCam, Round Two

In the October 2013 issue, I described the hardware and software I used to create my "BirdTopia Monitoring Station", more commonly called BirdCam. If you've been visiting BirdCam recently, which a surprising number of folks have been doing, you'll notice quite a few changes (Figure 1). In this article, I describe the upgrades, the changes and some of the challenges along the way. more>>

Command-Line Cloud: gcalcli

If you follow my columns in Linux Journal, you probably are aware that I'm a big fan of the command line. When it comes to getting things done efficiently, most of the time the command line can't be beat. more>>

Image Manipulation with ImageMagick

I've spent a lot of time in my column talking about text processing and analysis, with the basic assumption that if you're using the command line, you're focused on text. more>>

Encrypting Your Cat Photos

The truth is, I really don't have anything on my hard drive that I would be upset over someone seeing. I have some cat photos. I have a few text files with ideas for future books and/or short stories, and a couple half-written starts to NaNoWriMo novels. It would be easy to say that there's no point encrypting my hard drive, because I have nothing to hide. more>>

DNSSEC Part II: the Implementation

This article is the second in a series on DNSSEC. In the first one, I gave a general overview of DNSSEC concepts to lay the foundation for this article, which discusses how to enable DNSSEC for a zone using BIND. more>>

More Secure SSH Connections

If you need remote access to a machine, you'll probably use SSH, and for a good reason. The secure shell protocol uses modern cryptography methods to provide privacy and confidentiality, even over an unsecured, unsafe network, such as the Internet. more>>

Encrypted Backup Solution "Home Paranoia Edition"

How to safeguard your personal data with TrueCrypt and SpiderOak. more>>

Using Django and MongoDB to Build a Blog

This article shows how to create a simple blog site using the MongoDB Document Database and the Django Web framework. more>>

Talking to Twitter

Integrating Twitter into your application is easy, fun and useful. more>>

Web Administration Scripts—Redux

It's been months, and I'm still dealing with a DDOS (distributed denial of service) attack on my server—an attack that I can see is coming from China, but there's not really much I can do about it other than try to tweak firewall settings and so on. more>>

DNSSEC Part I: the Concepts

Like IPv6, DNSSEC is one of those great forward-looking protocols that unfortunately hasn't seen wide adoption yet. Before I implemented it myself, I could see why. Although some people think BIND itself is difficult to set up, DNSSEC adds an extra layer of keys, key management and a slew of additional DNS records. more>>

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