HOWTOs

DNSSEC Part I: the Concepts

Like IPv6, DNSSEC is one of those great forward-looking protocols that unfortunately hasn't seen wide adoption yet. Before I implemented it myself, I could see why. Although some people think BIND itself is difficult to set up, DNSSEC adds an extra layer of keys, key management and a slew of additional DNS records. more>>

Rails and PostgreSQL

Regular readers of this column won't be surprised to hear that I love both Ruby on Rails and PostgreSQL. Rails has been my primary server-side Web development framework for about eight years, and it has managed to provide solutions for a large number of consulting and personal projects. more>>

Two Pi R 2: Web Servers

In my last article, I talked about how even though an individual Raspberry Pi is not that redundant, two Pis are. I described how to set up two Raspberry Pis as a fault-tolerant file server using the GlusterFS clustered filesystem. more>>

Protect Your Ports with a Reverse Proxy

In a previous article, I discussed Apache Tomcat, which is the ideal way to run Java applications from your server. I explained that you can run those apps from Tomcat's default 8080 port, or you can configure Tomcat to use port 80. But, what if you want to run a traditional Web server and host Java apps on port 80? The answer is to run a reverse proxy. more>>

AIDE—Developing for Android on Android

Android, as a platform, is one of the fastest growing on the planet. It is available on smartphones and a series of different tablet sizes. Most devices also include a full spectrum of sensors that are available to programs you install, so it's a very inviting platform for development. more>>

A Handy U-Boot Trick

Embedded developers working on kernels or bare-metal programs often go through several development cycles. Each time the developer modifies the code, the code has to be compiled, the ELF (Executable and Linkable Format)/kernel image has to be copied onto the SD card, and the card then has to be transferred from the PC to the development board and rebooted. more>>

Web Administration Scripts

During the past month or so, I've also been dealing with an aggressive DDOS (that's a "distributed denial of service") attack on my server, one that's been a huge pain, as you might expect. What's odd is that with multiple domains on the same server, it's one of my less-popular sites that seems to have been the target of the attacks. more>>

Advanced Hard Drive Caching Techniques

With the introduction of the solid-state Flash drive, performance came to the forefront for data storage technologies. Prior to that, software developers and server administrators needed to devise methods for which they could increase I/O throughput to storage, most of which resulted in low capacity caching to random access memory (RAM) or a RAM drive. more>>

Manage Your Configs with vcsh

If you're anything like me (and don't you want to be?), you probably have more than one Linux or UNIX machine that you use on a regular basis. Perhaps you've got a laptop and a desktop. Or, maybe you've got a few servers on which you have shell accounts. more>>

Time-Saving Tricks on the Command Line

I remember the first time a friend of mine introduced me to Linux and showed me how I didn't need to type commands and path names fully—I could just start typing and use the Tab key to complete the rest. That was so cool. I think everybody loves Tab completion because it's something you use pretty much every minute you spend in the shell. more>>

Intro to Clojure on the Web

Lisp is one of those languages that people either love or hate. Count me among the Lisp lovers. I was brainwashed during my undergraduate studies at MIT to believe that Lisp is the only "real" programming language out there, and that anything else is a pale imitation. more>>

Cribbage: Calculating Hand Value

The last few months, we've been building a complex shell script to play elements of the game of Cribbage, demonstrating a variety of concepts and techniques as we proceed. That's all good, and last month, the script expanded to include a "shuffle" capability and the ability to deal out six cards, a typical two-player starting hand. more>>

Linux Advanced Routing Tutorial

For years, we used to have a plain-old ADSL in the office—fast download speeds, slow upload, high latency—all that at the cost of $1/GB. We have had so many problems with performance and reliability that after a few years of struggling, we decided to get a second upstream link—SHDSL 5M/5M symmetric link—low latency, consistent speed during the day. more>>

Twitter

Work the Shell - Listening to Your Twitter Stream

Answer simple Twitter queries automatically. more>>
Xen logo

Simple Virtual Appliances with Linux and Xen

Use Xen and Linux to make your own ready-to-use software virtual appliances. Create a DNS server, a Web server, a MySQL server—whatever you need, ready to go when you need it. more>>
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