HOW-TOs

A Little GUI for Your CLI

I've tried pretty much every IRC client available for both Linux and OS X. (I use both platforms during my day job.) No matter how many times I try to find a GUI application that meets my needs, I always turn back to Irssi. more>>

TogetherJS

Want to add real-time collaboration to your Web application? Mozilla's TogetherJS is worth a look. more>>

Command-Line Cloud: rss2email

In my last article, I started a series called Command-Line Cloud. The intent of the series is to discuss how to use the cloud services we are faced with these days without resorting to a Web browser. I spend most of my time on the command line, so that's where I'd most like to interface with cloud services. more>>

Two-Factor Authentication System for Apache and SSH

If you run a publicly accessible Web server for your own use (and let's face it, if you're reading Linux Journal, there's a very good chance you do), how do you go about limiting the risk of someone accessing your site and doing bad things? How about SSH, an even bigger concern? more>>

Create a Mini PC or Server with Olimex's Olinuxino A13/A13Micro

Olimex is a Bulgarian company known for its innovative hobbyist products. It has a wide array of microcontroller-based products, ranging from the small Arduino clones to the very able system that has the Allwinner A13 microcontroller as its brain. In this article, I describe how you can create a working Linux system for the Olinuxino A13 and Olinuxino A13Micro from scratch. more>>

Be a Mechanic...with Android and Linux!

"Check Engine Soon"—that little orange light on your car's instrument panel is possibly one of the more annoying things about modern automobiles. Ever had it pop on during a trip and wonder whether it was just something mundane, like your gas cap being loose, or whether it's something deathly serious and a piston could come shooting out the side of your engine block at any time? more>>

Compojure

In my last article, I started discussing Compojure, a Web framework written in the Clojure language. Clojure already has generated a great deal of excitement among software developers, in that it combines the beauty and expressive elegance of Lisp with the efficiency and ubiquity of the Java Virtual Machine (JVM). more>>

Two Pi R

Although many people are excited about the hardware-hacking possibilities with the Raspberry Pi, one of the things that interests me most is the fact that it is essentially a small low-power Linux server I can use to replace other Linux servers I already have around the house. more>>

Switching Monitor Profiles

It's funny, when your home office is your couch, you tend to forget how nice it can be when you dock a laptop and have all the extra screen real estate a monitor brings. For many years, I left my work laptop docked at work, and when I worked from home, I just VPNed in with a personal laptop. more>>

Temper Pi

It was inevitable. Back when the Raspberry Pi was announced, I knew I eventually would use one to power a beer fridge. more>>

September 2013 Issue of Linux Journal: HOW-TOs

How'd Ya Do That?

I tend to read science fiction or fantasy for entertainment and/or escape from reality. more>>

Advanced OpenMP

Because the August issue's theme is programming, I thought I should cover some of the more-advanced features available in OpenMP. more>>

Multi-Booting the Nexus 7 Tablet

Anyone who knows me well enough knows I love mobile devices. Phones, tablets and other shiny glowing gadgets are almost an addiction for me. I've talked about my addiction in other articles and columns, and Kyle Rankin even made fun of me once in a Point/Counterpoint column because my household has a bunch of iOS devices in it. more>>

Pythonic Parsing Programs

Creed of Python Developers

Pythonistas are eager to extol the lovely virtues of our language. Most beginning Python programmers are invited to run import this from the interpreter right after the canonical hello world. One of the favorite quips from running that command is: more>>

Cribbage: Sorting Your Hand

We've been working on writing code for the game Cribbage, and last time, I created the code needed to pick a random subset of six cards out of a "deck" and display them in an attractive format—like this: $ sh cribbage.sh Card 0: 7C Card 1: 5H Card 2: 9H Card 3: 10S Card 4: 5D Car more>>

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