games

Valve—It Really Does Love Linux

I've teased about Steam, speculated about Steam and even bragged about Steam finally coming to Linux. Heck, check out the screenshot for just a partial list of games already running natively under our beloved OS. Little did I know that the folks at Valve not only planned to support Linux, but they're also putting a big part of their future behind it as well! more>>

Android Candy: Gurk—8 Bits of Awesome

Gurk really shouldn't be awesome. The controls are awkward on-screen arrow keys. The graphics make the original Nintendo look state of the art in comparison. The gameplay is slow.

And yet I just spent two hours straight playing it! more>>

It's Getting Steamy in Here!

After months of me promising Steam would be coming to Linux, it's finally here. The early verdict: it's pretty great! The installer is a simple pre-packaged .deb file for Ubuntu (or Xubuntu in my case), and the user portion of the install looks very much like Windows or Macintosh. In my limited testing, I've found the Steam beta to be at least as stable as Desura. more>>

Gaming Like It's 1993

Two things happened in 1993: I attended my first year of college, and I played a lot of Scorched Earth. more>>

Trine 2 from Frozenbyte

One of the great things about independent game companies is that they realize Linux gamers exist—and we're willing to spend money. Frozenbyte is the indie game developer that brought us Shadowgrounds, Shadowgrounds Survivor and Trine. Frozenbyte was kind enough to send me a review copy of its newest release, Trine 2. more>>

Getting Steamy with Desura

I remember the first time I tried to install Quake on Linux. I was so excited to have a native "real" game to play, that I couldn't grab my installation CD fast enough. Unfortunately, I didn't really take good care of my media, and the CD was too scratched to read. more>>

Fun and Mayhem with the Blender Game Engine

Create 3-D games using the keyboard or mouse as controllers. more>>

Brain Workshop diagram

Project - Brain Workshop

If you're looking to improve your mental faculties, especially in the area of memory, check out this project. According to the Web site:

Brain Workshop is a free open-source version of the dual n-back brain training exercise. more>>

Linux Gaming: OpenClonk

Until recently, I had presumed that a Clonk was the sound that my hard drive made just before I realized that I hadn't backed it up properly. However, in this case, a Clonk is a tiny chap who can jump, climb and fire weapons in the service of reaching his goal. OpenClonk runs on Linux and is the latest in a series of side-view platform games that started life as a DOS shareware series. more>>

Minecraft. Not free.

Friday Fun: Minecraft

This week's game is one that isn't free. In any sense. It is closed source, and requires payment to even try it out. Why would we mention such a game here at Linux Journal? 2 reasons:

1) It works quite well in Linux more>>

Friday Means FUN!

Today is Friday, and regardless of what Rebecca Black might say, we don't all gotta get down. Some of us just want to play games. If you're under the impression gaming is reserved for Windows users, you are sadly mistaken. Here's a few I like: more>>

Arcade Fun - M.A.R.S.
Compatibility.  Awesome.

The Humble Frozenbyte Bundle

The folks over at HumbleBundle are currently running their third amazing game sale. It's a package deal from Frozenbyte, a Finnish game developer, that contains several computer games. What makes the sale amazing? Several things: more>>

All Games Are Linux Compatible

Parallel Realities: Retro-themed Linux games

The Parallel Realities website offers a collection of simple, mostly SDL based action games. more>>

Danger from the Deep

If you remember my December Linux Journal column, I was excited about a particularly cool-looking submarine simulator, Danger from the Deep. This month, I'm proud to feature it. According to its Web site: more>>

How-to Become a Linux Gamer

There are several resources out there to assist you in being a Linux gamer. The WINE project (www.winehq.org) is a great, free example of this as it allows you to run Windows programs (and games) on Linux. more>>

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