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Tiny Core Linux

If you want to go back to those great old days of really lightweight Linux, give Tiny Core Linux a try and relive the joy of a bare-bones system. more>>

Speech I/O for Embedded Applications

Is the world ready for speech-enabled embedded devices? Now the technology is here for usable speech recognition and synthesis. See how you can use it in your own embedded applications. more>>
Buildroot Main Menu

Roll Your Own Embedded Linux System with Buildroot

The time between getting a new piece of hardware and seeing a first shell prompt can be one of the most frustrating experiences for embedded Linux developers. Buildroot can help reduce your frustration. more>>

Hexapod—a Linux-Powered Spider Robot

A chat with Matt Bunting, developer of the hexapod robot. more>>

Breaking Free the Gumstix DSP

Compiling a Linux 2.6.33 kernel for the Gumstix Overo Fire with DSP support. more>>

Debugging Embedded Linux Platforms with GDB and Python

Give your debugging sessions go-faster stripes with the power of Python. more>>
PICkitII

Summer Hacking

It is summer on the northern hemisphere, and I've decided to target a smaller system than I've been used to in the last couple of years. In particular, I've decided to finally open my dear old PICkit II. The goal is to be able to work with this board from within a Linux environment. more>>

Barebox Logo

Booting Bare Hardware

Booting a computer is always more complex than one wants to think. On the PC side, it looks as if BIOS finally is retired and replaced by EFI (I wonder which was the last OS to use BIOS for anything that just loading a secondary bootloader). On Mac, EFI has been around for a while. On embedded Linux systems, however, u-boot has been a big player for a long time. more>>

2010 Readers' Choice Awards

Readers' Choice Awards 2010

The votes are in! Read on to find out how your favorites fared in this year's awards. more>>

Qt

Using qDebug

GUI debuggers are the norm these days, however, I still feel the urge to do a little printf-debugging now and then. It might be wrong, it might be silly but it works.

I like to develop the odd graphical application and I like use Qt. For Qt, the nice Norwegian Trolls have provided the qDebug function. You can use it right away just like your old trusted printf: more>>

Cross Compiling Qt

On of the great aspects of Qt is that it is cross platform. Not only across desktops, but also across devices. The Qt make tool, qmake, can be configured to cross compile for different architectures using different compilers and different settings. How to do all this is reasonably straight forward, but you need to know how to get started. more>>

A Quick Look at Qt Quick

Qt 4.7 has not been released yet, but the curious can download the beta or even grab a snapshot from git. The big news in this point seven release is Qt Quick - a new approach to user interfaces. more>>

QVFb in action

The Qt Virtual Framebuffer

Qt comes with a handy tool that lives a rather anonymous life in the tools/qvfb directory. This tool does wonders when it comes to demoing, training users and creating documentation. more>>

The power on button

A Look at minit

Sys-V init has long been the standard solution for booting. It's kind of easy to work with, it kind of works and everybody kind of knows it. However, being open minded, let's look at an alternative approach. more>>

Cross Compiling Options

What is your strategy on cross compilation toolchains? Here we explore a few options: more>>

DIY - requires you to manually start each step, unless you're comfortable enough to script the process. As each step takes ages, this can be a tedious job. However, it gives you full control and insight into each step.
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