Desktop

The Italian Army Switches to LibreOffice

Following announcements made last year, the Italian army has moved forward with its plan to replace Microsoft Office with LibreOffice. more>>

PeaZip

Free of charge for any use and free of any kind of advertising bundle, PeaZip is an open-source (LGPL) file archiver, a free alternative to software like WinRar and WinZip, for Li more>>

Canonical and BQ's Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition Tablet

Canonical's broad vision for Ubuntu Linux is to offer a single, converged personal computing experience across devices. more>>

Kolab Systems AG and Collabora's CloudSuite

The chemistry created by the Kolab Systems-Collabora Productivity partnership enabled CloudSuite, the first 100% open-source, enterprise-grade cloud office suite. more>>

GNOME 3.2 Released

While the GNOME desktop environment has its fair share of detractors, there are some who appreciate its simplified approach, so the recent release of the latest version is an eagerly anticipated event. more>>

KDE Plasma 5.6 Released

KDE Plasma is the desktop environment that powers Kubuntu, Chakra Linux and openSUSE (among others). This week sees the release of Plasma 5.6, which brings several tweaks and improvements. more>>

Simple Photo Editing, Linux Edition!

A while back I wrote about the awesome open-source image editing program Paint.NET, which is available only for Windows. Although I'm thrilled there is an open-source option for Windows users, Paint.NET is one of those apps that is so cool, I wish it worked in Linux! Thankfully, there's another app in town with similar features, and it's cross-platform! more>>

Cinnamon 2.8 Ready to Try

As Cinnamon 2.8 approaches official release later this month, the developers have made the pre-release version available to early adopters. If you are eager to try it, there are two different options. Mint users can install it through the package manager. Otherwise, you can build it from source. more>>

Cinnamon 2.6 Released

Cinnamon, one the default desktops of Linux Mint (alongside Mate) has recently been updated. Version 2.6 has a boatload of fixes, tweaks and improvements. Here are some of them: more>>

The Usability of GNOME

I work at a university, and one of our faculty members often repeats to me, "Software needs to be like a rock; it needs to be that easy to use." And, she's right. Because if software is too hard to use, no one will want to use it. more>>

Readers' Choice Awards 2013

This year's Reader's Choice issue was truly fun to put together. No, not just because you do all the work (voting), but because it's great to get a feel for what our community is buzzing about. Based on your feedback, we've given you all the data again this year, with percentages and rankings, plus we tried to include as many of your less-popular responses as possible. more>>

Non-Linux FOSS: Chrome Desktop Applications

Hopefully by the time you're reading this, Chrome Desktop Applications will be available for Linux. In the meantime, this is a Windows treat. The ability to make a "single-purpose" browser has been around Chrome/Chromium for a long time, but with the new breed of Chrome Applications, the browser is a base for a standalone, off-line application. more>>

Switching Monitor Profiles

It's funny, when your home office is your couch, you tend to forget how nice it can be when you dock a laptop and have all the extra screen real estate a monitor brings. For many years, I left my work laptop docked at work, and when I worked from home, I just VPNed in with a personal laptop. more>>

Non-Linux FOSS: Launchy!

With Unity's method for launching and finding programs and applications, and OS X's spotlight tool becoming the new way to launch programs, the entire way we think about launching programs is changing. Although I still like to have a few icon shortcuts on my task bar, many folks prefer a quick keystroke to bring up Gnome-Do, or Unity's launcher, or even OS X's spotlight. more>>

Google Drive for Linux?

For some reason, Google seems to dislike Google Drive users who prefer Linux. I find this particularly strange, since Google's Chrome OS is based on Linux. Thankfully, the folks over at Insync not only provide Linux support for Google Drive syncing, they do it with style. more>>

Syndicate content