command line

Non-Linux FOSS: Don't Drink the Apple Kool-Aid; Brew Your Own!

Some tools that I use on the command line are so basic and so ingrained in my day-to-day actions that it's weird when they're not available. This often happens to me on OS X. I love that OS X has UNIX underpinnings. I love that the terminal window is a real terminal window and works like a terminal window should work. more>>

Susan Lauber's Linux Command Line Complete Video Course (Prentice Hall)

Users, developers and administrators can all find much to love in Linux's powerful command line. more>>

Reading Web Comics via Bash Script

I follow several Web comics. I used to open my Web browser and check out each comic's Web site. That method was fine when I read only a few Web comics, but it became a pain to stay current when I followed more than about ten comics. These days, I read around 20 Web comics. It takes a lot of time to open each Web site separately just to read a Web comic. more>>

Check Exchange from the Command Line

Through the years, you tend to accumulate a suite of tools, practices and settings as you use Linux. more>>

Resizing Images with ImageMagick

Sure, you can open up a graphics program like GIMP and resize an image, but what if you want to resize 10, 50 or 200 images? ImageMagick's convert program is just what you need. more>>

Command-Line Cloud: rss2email

In my last article, I started a series called Command-Line Cloud. The intent of the series is to discuss how to use the cloud services we are faced with these days without resorting to a Web browser. I spend most of my time on the command line, so that's where I'd most like to interface with cloud services. more>>

Command-Line Cloud: gcalcli

If you follow my columns in Linux Journal, you probably are aware that I'm a big fan of the command line. When it comes to getting things done efficiently, most of the time the command line can't be beat. more>>

Speed Test for Nerds

Most people with Internet access in their houses have visited a speed-test Web site to make sure they're getting somewhere close to the speed they're overpaying for. I'm paying more than $100 a month for my business-class connection from Charter, so on a regular basis, I make sure I'm getting the advertised speed. more>>

Make Peace with pax

pax is one of the lesser known utilities in a typical Linux installation. That's too bad, because pax has a very good feature set, and its command-line options are easy to understand and remember. pax is an archiver, like tar(1), but it's also a better version of cp(1) in some ways, not least because you can use pax with SSH to copy sets of files over a network. more>>

Time-Saving Tricks on the Command Line

I remember the first time a friend of mine introduced me to Linux and showed me how I didn't need to type commands and path names fully—I could just start typing and use the Tab key to complete the rest. That was so cool. I think everybody loves Tab completion because it's something you use pretty much every minute you spend in the shell. more>>

Non-Linux FOSS: libnotify, OS X Style

One of the things I dislike about using Irssi in a terminal window on OS X is that I often miss the screen flash when someone mentions my name in IRC. With some fancy SSH tunneling (maybe more on that some other issue) and a really cool pop-up notification tool, if someone mentions my name, I can't miss it. more>>

Weechat, Irssi's Little Brother

It may not be fair to call Weechat the little brother of Irssi, but in my short introduction to it, that's what it felt like. If Weechat didn't seem quite as powerful as Irssi to me, I definitely can say that it is better-looking out of the box. So, little brother has one thing going for him! more>>

One Tail Just Isn't Enough

Although it's difficult for me to look at this piece's title and not think of mutant felines, it doesn't make the statement any less true. If you've ever used the tail command on log files, you'll instantly appreciate multitail. My friend (and LJ reader) Nick Danger introduced me to multitail, and I can't believe how useful it is. more>>

Shell Game

Many of the cool things in Linux Journal require the use of the command line. For us Linux users, that's generally not a big deal, because we have a terminal window readily available. Some of the time, however, it's helpful to have a shell account on an Internet host somewhere. more>>

Read Linux Journal from the Command Line

In this day and age, there are more ways to read than ever before. Even though Linux Journal no longer publishes on paper, you still can read it with Web browsers, PDF software, e-book readers and cell phones. I don't have an e-book reader myself, but I think you could make the argument that the one true way to read Linux Journal is from the command line. more>>

Syndicate content