Are you planning to or have you recently migrated to Linux from another development platform?

Yes, from AIX
2% (78 votes)
Yes, from Sun Solaris
4% (148 votes)
Yes, from HPUX
2% (63 votes)
Yes, from Windows
59% (1990 votes)
Yes, from another platform
4% (144 votes)
No
28% (925 votes)
Total votes: 3348

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migration to linux

kuppuswamy's picture

I am using linux for nearly five years. I distro hopped to almost all popular linux to get first hand experience about each distro. I found almost all of them are easy to use with a little patitence and will to learn. I hope liux will find more and more user in future.

From Windows and Mac OS X

Ferianriel 's picture

2 years ago, I installed in my PC Ubuntu in dual-boot with the outdated Windows XP in order to have a more secure, stable and updated system. Now, Linux is becoming my favourite OS which I use for my everyday activities such as working, listen to music...
Recently, I've installed Mintppc in my old PowerBook G4. I can say that it resurrected this old Macintosh PowerPC, and with Linux, it became more fast and stable and usable. So, I recommended Linux for all people who have an old PowerPC Macintosh and who don't know what to do about it. But be careful, the installation process can be very hard and annoying with Mac...

I only use linux, so no

Anonymous's picture

I only use linux, so no migration needed. Made that migration 4 years ago.

did any of you read the

Anonymous's picture

did any of you read the question? you guys are talking about migrating desktops, the question is about servers. when was the last time you worked on an AIX, HP-UX, or even a Solaris as a desktop. and yes, lots of us are using linux on our desktops, actually we all should, its free. read people!

Still plenty of Windoze shops to migrate to GNU/Linux

Sum Yung Gai's picture

I migrated myself over years ago ("Microsoft Free Since 2003"). However, others need to be freed from their Microsoft Jail (R) installations, and that's what I do.

When they buy new computers, they often have an older Pentium-III or Athlon XP or something similar. They're often also getting broadband access (cable modem, DSL, etc.) or something like it. I advise these folks not to toss out their old computer. I tell 'em, "hey, you already have a great firewall sitting right here, for free!" Add a NIC or two, and then OpenBSD gets put on these older computers. Voila, a top-notch home firewall is born. :-)

A distro like Ubuntu goes on their newer, more powerful multi-core box. Yes, I do hold my nose and install the proprietary nVidious or AMD/ATI drivers, if applicable. Same for Adobe Flash. Why? Rome wasn't built in a day, and this *is* still a major improvement.

Result: happy computer users who don't have to spend all that time maintaining their computers. They Just Work (TM).

--SYG

Windows and Ubuntu 10.04 Dual Boot

MHazell's picture

I have recently set up a dual boot of Windows XP and Ubuntu 10.04 LTS. I might not upgrade from 10.04 when 12.04 comes out because Unity does not display on my Toshiba M55-S139 Laptop, and I can't even get a desktop to even activate GNOME.

migration

Anonymous's picture

I migrated from windows to Linux Mint a few years ago and could not be happier. Should have done this much earlier, but thought that Linux is more for programmers or experts as such. After a few weeks of using dual systems i threw out MS and have been recommending the system since to my network and to those who prefer a stable and secure system.

Sorry I answerd no but

Fred Love's picture

Been useing Linux for years now. so no it hasn't been recent, (unless 8 years is recent) and I have no other platform to migrate from.

same here

Anonymous's picture

same here, been running linux for ages...
so your missing option would be i'm already running linux for years now you insensitive clod!

Moving the last bits

NatNiks's picture

I'm on linux starting from Debian/Patato
First only my servers but later on also my desktops.
Have only a winxp to support my Logitech G110 keyboard.

apps

Kilgore Trout's picture

If Linux could have a DVDfab type app in Linux that actually works I would completely switch over.

Goodbye Microsoft

apexwm's picture

I migrated everything I have from Windows about 4 years ago (have used Linux since 1997 though). I couldn't be happier. I've been using Fedora Linux and continue to use it, very good stuff. I've also migrated many friends and relatives as well, all very happy and best of all no more support calls coming back to me. I urge everybody I talk to to at least TRY it. Do yourself a favor, download the Live CD, run it, and give it a test drive.

yes from MacOS X

Anonymous's picture

yes from MacOS X

mac os x

Anonymous's picture

yep, Mac os X Server is dead, so time to move on...

The Question.

bloke's picture

Hey all.

I always look forward to checking your website. Its pretty good!

However on the matter of the above question, I think your results for the 'no' option are unclear.

People could be answering 'No' to 'recently' or to 'Linux'.

A person that has used linux for a while is not accounted for in the question and the structure of the question leaves the result open to the drawing of a false positive.

Jut a thought.

Ant.

I read and don't answer

Anonymous's picture

I read and don't answer because that... I use and develop for/in linux platforms for some years.

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