What is your favorite open source CMS?

Drupal
19% (1529 votes)
Joomla
13% (1085 votes)
WordPress
39% (3198 votes)
MODx
10% (777 votes)
TYPO3
8% (619 votes)
Plone
4% (307 votes)
other (please tell us which one in comments)
7% (585 votes)
Total votes: 8100

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Textpattern CMS

Stef Dawson's picture

Another vote for Textpattern CMS. It's the designers' choice: lightweight, flexible, powerful, and the simplicity of bolting on plugins takes sites far beyond anything its humble interface would imply.

Textpattern for ever!

Joop Vos's picture

All my sites are powered by Textpattern!

Textpattern

Wion's picture

Go Textpattern go!

Julián Landerreche's picture

Votes for TXP should be counted twice, as it hasn't been included on the list of choices for this poll. No, no logical reasoning behind the "count them twice" proposal.

Textpattern

Anonymous's picture

Light, smart, flexible and a lovely community.

Textpattern CMS

John Stephens's picture

Free, flexible, elegant, secure, and easy-to-use: Textpattern, hands down.

Textpattern CMS

[Axel]'s picture

Not to forget easy expandable and customisable!

Both thumbs up

textpattern!

jandw's picture

textpattern deserves to be included.

Wordpress? Are you serious?

kallisti0815's picture

Wordpress? Are you serious? Wtf

Deadly serious. WordPress was

jwhite's picture

Deadly serious. WordPress was recently confirmed to be powering just under 10% sites on the web. A majority of developers in the community are now using it to build fully powered sites: http://wordpress.org/showcase/

MODX

Giorgio's picture

MODX wins.....

Spip

Anonymous's picture

Hippo CMS

Anonymous's picture

Hippo CMS (open source, Java-based enterprise content management platform, JSR-170, REST, Spring MvC, open social, Widgets /gadgets).

check the demo at: http://www.onehippo.com/try

TYPO3 is my choice

Laci's picture

I use TYPO3 for several years, i also tried Drupal, Joomla and Wordpress but i came to the conclusion that for most of the tasks at hand TYPO3 is the good choice. Also it has a clean template system (in fact you can use several templating engines) which has no code in it, so even designers with no PHP knowledge can build templates.

Definitevely Modx

Og Prodata's picture

Almost 95% of our project based on this CMS.

Simple enduser interface... which is the most important !

MODx is top for clients

7media Webdesign's picture

I'm using MODx since 2005. Found that all kinds of clients are using it quite frequently and they like it. For 95% Typo3 ist too big and hard to learn and to remember. There was nothing I couldn't do with MODx (with help of community of course) that clients needed.

Torn between 2

kvanconant's picture

I have used Joomla for almost all of my sites. I can get a professional looking site up in under 2 days. But on the other hand it does limit you in what you can do. I have been trying Modx on my alsministries.com website but some of the "Perks" are difficult compared to Joomla.
So I will see how it turns out for Modx in the next couple of days.

Different solution

Philipp Schilling's picture

Why not give Textpattern a try? You’re absolutely free in what code and what structure you use. If MODx was the framework of your choice Textpattern might be the CMS you fell in love with.

Onxshop

Norbert's picture

I have long commercial experience with Typo3 and it gave me some good ideas in development of http://Onxshop.com, which was recently published on GitHub. It's a stable system, used in production environment since 2007, but only now is going to be released as Debian package.

Django-based CMSes

Nicola Larosa's picture

Wanna use Python, but are discouraged by Plone? Both http://www.merengueproject.org/ and https://www.django-cms.org/ are very good. More details at http://code.djangoproject.com/wiki/CMSAppsComparison and http://djangopackages.com/grids/g/cms/ .

Just Modx

Adhi's picture

just MODX make me sleep soundly

I enjoy Silverstripe

Anonymous's picture

I enjoy Silverstripe immensely as both a developer and end-user. Can't stand Squiz Matrix as either.

Wordpress is nice for simple news-style sites, but isn't really flexible enough for most of what I need to do.

Squiz Matrix. Fantastic CMS

Anonymous's picture

Squiz Matrix. Fantastic CMS for large organisations/websites.

Drupal Rocks!

chas's picture

Wordpress

Snott's picture

Wordpress is not anymore a blocking only platform. It's very flexible and I have seen/done terrific websites for businesses and individuals that are not blog focused.

My vote is for

Anonymous's picture

My vote is for Drupal
Linuxjournal also vote for drupal http://www.linuxjournal.com/CHANGELOG.txt , even if they are 3 minor releases and one major behind ;p

That means they're also

Anonymous's picture

That means they're also missing a core security release. I'd like to be able to expect more from a website for a magazine dedicated to Linux.

But I guess, much as with the OS.. security requires diligence, and in this case apparently the web staff are lacking. That's kind of depressing.

That said, I too choose Drupal.

nice one

jason john wells's picture

Well played Anonymous, well played.

Can't beat Drupal when it

Anonymous's picture

Can't beat Drupal when it comes to flexibility and modularity. And the API documentation rocks.

Dotclear

Siddharta's picture

Dotclear is my favorite CMS. I tried Jaws, Tango, and others that do not use databases but simple text files. Dotclear is the one that suited best for me and my needs.

Sidd.

TikiWiki

Anonymous's picture

Besides the fact that it takes forever to upload, I like TikiWiki!

can't find SilverStripe on the list!

hammudi's picture

my favorite is SilverStripe!

Drupal is my farvorit choice,

Anonymous's picture

Drupal is my farvorit choice, great api, extremly flexible,tons of modules and best documentation i every saw.

Surprised Silverstripe isn't

Anonymous's picture

Surprised Silverstripe isn't on this list

concrete5

Anonymous's picture

concrete5

CMS

stooni's picture

I find Silverstripe very cool and light!

... Stooni

what cms! joomla ? wordpress

Anonymous's picture

what cms! joomla ?
wordpress is a blog tool.

Movable type

Anonymous's picture

Movable type

still love wordpress right

krozbonek's picture

still love wordpress right now :)

RefineryCMS for sure

Anonymous's picture

RefineryCMS for sure

Totaly agree RefineryCMS its

3zcurdia's picture

Totaly agree RefineryCMS its simple an clean and the best run over RoR

Radiant

gwhilts's picture

A great, easily extensible CMS written using Rails.

MODX

Mac Conin's picture

MODX has stolen my heart. Easy, flexible, infitely extendable.
No script language, strictly separated css, html and php and tada:xpdo.

After 5 years with MODX I'm still surprised by the power of MODX - and of the fast and friendly support of the MODX community.

Interested

Mozai's picture

I'm very interested in the answer. I've yet to seen something labeled a CMS that isn't actually "we built a nifty DB-driven website, and now you can build one exactly like ours!" Granted, I was soured on the label CMS years ago, and I've had to sysadmin for a few badly managed ones, so I look forward to the recommendations or articles that will come from this poll.

Give MODX a try...

hamstra.mark's picture

While MODX is obviously database driven there is no such thing as a "MODX look". You can see that for yourself in the MODX Showcase at http://modx.com/learn/gallery/ and the MODX Club at http://modxclub.com/.

The reason you don't have a MODX look is that you are given infinite freedom. A "template" in MODX consists of all the HTML you want MODX to display, from your HTML doctype all the way down to the end. To get your content in there, you use so called "tags" which are simply two square brackets, a token showing what kind of content you are looking for, the name and two closing square brackets.

For example [[*pagetitle]] (* denotes a resource (=page) field), or [[$header]] ($ denotes a "chunk", which is simply a block of text, html or anything that you can reuse).
There's more types of "elements" such as snippets (php code that can be used to inject dynamic functionality) and plugins (these are triggered throughout the manager and the process of displaying the page and allow modifying the core without touching the core code).

So with that, and the built in custom fields functionality that are called "Template Variables", you can set up your template to build table based, semantic html5 or strict xml output. Heck - you can already write in HTML7 should you want to!

MODX is based on xPDO, which is a database abstraction layer developed by the MODX core team as well, that provides database agnostic data. Thanks to xPDO, the 2.1 release can be used both on MySQL and sqlsrv and for sure there are more database types to follow. :)

MODx Reigns Supreme...in my book

mayhemchaos's picture

MODx CMS is the best solution for a TRUE content management system...not a high-powered BLOG tool that ACTS or...HACKS like a CMS.

Everything about MODx is unique to you, the developer. No bloated plugins, not "Top 10 WP plugins for..." it's just out-of-the-box ready for SEO, clean, semantic development and the community, not unlike WP, is strong, friendly and always willing to lend a hand or brain.

Escher CMS

Sam Weiss's picture

Escher CMS, of course! OK, I'm the author, so admittedly biased. :)

MODx and a shout for Django WDF

Stuart McMartin's picture

Voted for MODx but feel the Django Web Development Framework deserves an honourable mention. More for heavyweight database applications than strictly as a CMS. http://www.djangoproject.com/

MODX

Expanism's picture

Working with MODX for years now, it's perfect for creating custom websites.
Clients really like the backend which is fully customizable!

concrete

Andrey's picture

concrete

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