What is your favorite Linux monitoring application?

Hyperic
4% (169 votes)
Ganglia
2% (88 votes)
Nagios
25% (1209 votes)
Uptime Software
2% (100 votes)
Groundwork
1% (35 votes)
other (please tell us which one in the comments below)
7% (358 votes)
Zenoss
3% (165 votes)
Cacti
6% (299 votes)
Zabbix
44% (2105 votes)
OpenNMS
6% (279 votes)
Total votes: 4807

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Zabbix FTW

Walter Heck's picture

Zabbix definitely. Liked it so much that I started a service doing hosted zabbix now: http://tribily.com
Started that mainly because I got sick and tired of setting up zabbix over and over again with new clients and new projects every time :)

I use Nagios...

Anonymous's picture

... witch Centreon of course!

My favorite is nagios based

Anonymous's picture

My favorite is nagios based opsview.

zabbix

Anonymous's picture

zabbix ftw.

i love zabbix

Anonymous's picture

with zabbix you can monitor everything

I use zabbix and Orabbix to monitor Oracle

more info here: http://www.smartmarmot.com

I choose zabbix

Enhanced Zabbix's picture

But frankly I think nagios is more powerful and easy to maintain(with the help of Makefile), zabbix is powerful but it still a little messing. So, I'm tryting to build an enhanced zabbix release, details is available here - http://www.admon.org/

Linux monitoring tool

Jordi's picture

I think that ZAbbix is now the most compresive tool

Zabbix is The Best - Zabbix has it all !

Kiyoshi Hirose's picture

Zabbix is easy to use, implement, and customize. Operation is intuitive! Almost all functionality is included for both server and network monitoring. If something is missing for your environment, you can easily add new function or customize.
Zabbix will be a next generation OSS monitoring tool.
Zabbix has it all!

zabbix

IgorD's picture

Agree with you!

Zabbix is the Best

Adriano Amorim's picture

For us here Zabbix is the most professional application for network monitoring. Works great!!!

Zabbix - works out of the "box"

Greenogre's picture

Nagios is great, very solid but the architecture is aging.

Zabbix is the next generation. It has all the basics, monitoring, graphing, alerts, right out of the box. All configured from a decent, though a little obscure, web interface and stored in the sql database of your choice.

If you haven't looked at Zabbix 1.8, you should.

Zabbix is our monitoring systems for next 10 years

Matthew Marlowe's picture

Big Brother -> Hobbit -> Xymon was our monitoring system of choice for almost 15 years, but it wasn't developing/updating as fast as we wanted.

Evaluated hyperic, nagios, etc -- lots of great benefits but just couldn't get them to be as easily extendable, manageable, reliable, and usable as we needed.

Transitioned to Zabbix a year ago and are confident that it will serve us well as our base of monitoring infrastructure for the next 10-15 years. Thank you Zabbix devs.

Used to get Nagios but

Wayne  Jackson's picture

Used to get Nagios but switched to Zabbix

Open source is a very good

Anonymous's picture

Open source is a very good alternative in this downturn period

OpsView

Anonymous's picture

OpsView - based on Nagios with extended options

Zabbix

Marcos's picture

Zabbix

zabbix

Anonymous's picture

we prefer zabbix

Zabbix

Cristina Arqued's picture

Zabbix

Nagios with check_mk (from Mathias Kettner)

Anonymous's picture

If you haven't explored this, you should.

How about ./mon

Marcelo Correa's picture

https://mon.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/Main_Page
easy customizable with perl, small footprint

Oculus

Bart Friederichs's picture

Because of the complexity of Nagios, I started my own monitoring system: Oculus (http://blog.friesoft.nl/software/oculus/). In version 0.12 now, should be production ready somewhere this year.

Until then, I actually don't monitor. As long as everything is working, there is no problem ;-).

I'm surprised that

Bob Dobbs's picture

I'm surprised that Xymon/Hobbit isn't in the list of choices, it's definitely my first choice.

Ham Radio

Fred H's picture

Some time ago you published an article regarding "Ham Radio". I would like to get a copy of it. Do you have a fie about it or a hard copy of it.

Fred H.

Favorite monitoring app

rikih's picture

i used to use cacti + groundwork/nagios,the best combination :D

favourite monitoring tool

cayzar's picture

I tried Nagios and found it very complicated.
To have graphics you have to add centreon.
I dont understand why Nagios is so popular.

Now i'm using Xymon/Devmon/BBwin, it's much easier to manage.

Zabbix - solid monitoring tool

Sreekysri's picture

Our company started using zabbix for last 1 year and its doing pretty awesome job..Moreover we are installing new Mikoomi monitoring appliance ,its virtual appliance based on Zabbix.

Favorite monitoring tool

Ruud Baart (Prompt)'s picture

We use Zabbix. It is flexible and suitable for medium and large environments. It is not very easy but if you want to build a custom build network monitoring system it must be flexible and scalable. Zabbix is.

Newest version of Zabbix

Heywood's picture

The recently released Zabbix version 1.8.2 is simply awesome.

LogicMonitor Saves You Time

sbarie's picture

Nagios is great when you have time to set it up and maintain it. If you don't, take a look at an automated monitoring tool called LogicMonitor. Monitors everything for you by default - no configuration required. Not free, but neither is your time. Check out http://www.logicmonitor.com for more information and a free trial.

Zabbix + Munin

TIM's picture

For most part we use Zabbix and Munin
and we still have MRTG.

OpenNMS is the BOMB

Anonymous's picture

You can't beat it for ease of configuration. I've tried them all and OpenNMS makes my life very simple. Very flexible configuration system.

N is for Nagios, that's good enough for me

rich gregory's picture

We started using Nagios several years ago and I have learned how to write custom
scripts to detect SAMBA login failures and shell login failures. It is great. The security
model is simple and near impossible to hack.

See my notes

rich

Interested in Hyperic

HanderClander's picture

We were interested in Hyperic, but it's high pricing profile can't make us afford it..:(

Pandora Flexible Monitoring system

Christian Langlois's picture

I chose to use this to monitor live servers and office systems back in 2005, I really liked the simple install, easy to write addon agents and remote collectors, the usefull graphics helped immensely to diagnose performance of jav virtual machines, memory, cpu and request rates.

We even had it send alerts via sms to operations when certain limits, events were triggered.

Can't understand why it never gets featured.

http://pandorafms.org/

Monitorix http://www.monitori

Anonymous's picture

Combination of Cacti+SmokePing+Munin+Monit+nTOP+OSSIM

Kman's picture

Used for different things on networks e.g. Cacti for raw Bandwidth usage, Smokeping for WAN connectivity and alerting, Munin for host info and Monit for alerting host info, nTOP for local LAN data and OSSIM for IDS in a DMZ network.

OSSIM

Audiobog's picture

I love OSSIM from Alienvault! Quite similar to Groundworks, but includes more applications.

Munin + Monit + netstat.php

Andreas Schamanek's picture

I was looking for something simple. After some research I've chosen Munin which in fact is a graphing tool but already does some nice monitoring, too.
Monit I use where protocols and finer grading of alerts is needed.
netstat.php I wrote myself to have a simple "interface" (with red and green lights:) for my users + clients (something which I found even many of bigger solutions are lacking).

Nagios + Cacti

Anonymous's picture

Nagios + Cacti

Mon

snarlydwarf's picture

Mon has monitored my network for 13 years now, I think.

More a 'framework for scheduling monitoring activities and alerts'. A few lines of a script (usually perl) to return a 'this is working/failed' status, a script to generate alerts (via whatever mechanism you have... email, sms gateway, for a long while I had it dialing a numeric pager via modem), etc.

Simple and reliable, it's one of those packages that Just Works.

Zabbix

Morne's picture

I use Zabbix

Zabbix FTW! 1.8.x branch is

zabbix's picture

Zabbix FTW! 1.8.x branch is showing big improvements in stability, features, and php frontend

Zabbix missing?

Anonymous's picture

Wondering why Zabbix is not listed as an option.

Favorite monitoring app: Hobbit

Alain van Hoof's picture

Simple and extendable.

I have used Big Brother, and

Stewart's picture

I have used Big Brother, and now use hobbit to monitor over 4000 devices across 430 distinct sites. Works great and the customization ability and extensibility is amazing. Anything you can check with a simple script can be monitored and graphed.

Zabbix, OpenNMS

Roberta's picture

Switched from Openview long, long ago. Switched from BB long ago. Switched from Nagios+Cacti a couple of years ago. Am quite satisfied with Zabbix now, though it's alerting subsystem is not up to Nagios it is otherwise much simpler and more powerfull. We write python + zabbix_get scripts to do alerting. Main drawback, other than alerts, is that it's written in PHP.

Second place has to go to OpenNMS which has most of the features of the others but none of the upgrade / security / integration hassles (thanks primarily to Java).

OpenNMS of course.

Anonymous's picture

OpenNMS of course.

Favorite Monitoring App

William "Papa" Meloney's picture

Xymon | Hobbit since... forever!

Xymon and Cacti

Ian MacIntosh's picture

Xymon and Cacti

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