Tell us about your favorite Linux distribution!

I've used distributions based on Redhat, Suse, Slackware, Debian and
Gentoo and tried a lot of other ones listed on distrowatch. It really
depends on what I'm trying to accomplish and what problem I'm faced
with... I've developed my own Linux From Scratch before as well as
worked from a Stage 1 Gentoo installation...

For embedded development I do custom builds using BusyBox, uCLibC and
Linux 2.6.

For enterprise computing using Oracle I use RHEL. (CentOS is also a good alternative.)

For day to day desktop computing I tend to use Fedora or Debian (I have
both setup at home.)

I like Monowall, Firecop and a few others for instant security oriented
purposes.

In the interest of time I'll stop here but the general gist of what I'm
saying is it really depends upon the problem and how adventurous I'm
feeling.

:-)

______________________

Adam Dutko is a Linux Journal Reader Advisory Panelist.
"...thanks for all the fish..."
http://littlehat.homelinux.org

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badarudeen km 's picture

hey guys iam new to linux i hav only tried ubuntu 2008 and mandriva 2007
i think mandriva was more feature rich in terms of customization & entertainment
compared to ubuntu wat is your opinion plz post a comment
i also got boot failures while i installed ubuntu
plz reply

Well

Fernando Leme's picture

I've tried lots of distros. I've even tried to build one from scratch, and, like somebody said above, i'd love to see my system's internals, but!!
Ijust don't have enough time and knowledge to build it all, and, my desktop is required to do so many diferent things that I'd spend so much time... so.... I've just installed my kubuntu and it makes me really happy.

I use Gentoo, although

Anonymous's picture

I use Gentoo, although admittedly it's mainly because I've never really needed to use anything else. I like Portage, I like USE flags, I like seeing the system internals, I like compiling from source (even though it's probably only a tenth-of-one-percent performance improvement, a) it's cool and b) it makes setting up my own custom patches easy), I like that having a minimalist system is easy. Perhaps the only thing I don't like is that they don't make new LiveCD releases frequently enough to keep up with new hardware support, but that's only come up once, and I was able to install from a Sabayon LiveCD. (Of course, I want to dual-boot Vista on the new machine for gaming, but Vista won't install either.)

I just remembered...

Shawn Powers's picture

I just remembered early last year I posted a bit of silliness regarding my distro of choice:

Not-Your-Buntu. It's a real winner. ;)

Shawn Powers is an Associate Editor for Linux Journal. You might find him chatting on the IRC channel, or Twitter

Distro Fever

Mike Roberts's picture

I do Kubuntu because it do so well. Also Damn Small Linux because it's damn small and linux. I'm open to other suggestions too.

Mike Roberts is a bewildered Linux Journal Reader Advisory Panelist.

Hi, I'm Lazy

Shawn Powers's picture

I use mainly Ubuntu. Why? Because it "just works." It's easy, it's small (one CD), it's compatible. And yes, since I'm lazy, it's the distro for me.

Shawn Powers is an Associate Editor for Linux Journal. You might find him chatting on the IRC channel, or Twitter

Me too

Justin Ryan's picture

Ditto the above. I've got three boxes running Ubuntu: my regular desktop, my laptop, and a test box. I've run Kubuntu and Xubuntu on the test box, and have used a couple other flavors (Debian & Red Hat) on servers I've used. But for my day-to-day needs, I like Ubuntu because - like Shawn said - it just works.

Justin Ryan is a Contributing Editor for Linux Journal.

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