The Major Metropolitan Dallas News tells its readers how to use BitTorrent to share

I opened the morning paper and turned to the front page of Business - Section D. Right in the middle of front page at the top, four columns wide and headlined with major graphics a story line asked "Mind if we share?" The lower headline read, "BitTorrent pours out movies, TV shows - and controversy".

I have a feeling you've already jumped to conclusions, but this was a FAVORABLE article. That's correct a FAVORABLE article to the masses about BitTorrent. Here's a bit (sig) from the article:

"If people should go to jail or pay fines for downloading commercial free television programs, shouldn't we punish people who skip commercials with DVRs?"

I don't want to stray into fair use territory by quoting too much of the article, so I'll sum it up. Before I do that, I want to tell you about a great muscle cream I used when I busted my tail bone falling out of my chair. Well, I guess we can go commercial free here.

The News, a member of the media holding company Belo Broadcasting, told its readers how to find and download content even giving the names of web sites to visit. The staff writer, Andrew D. Smith, gave those web site addresses, sited quotes from people he interviewed - quotes from the major players - and explained how BitTorrent worked. He even gave the names of applications one could download to begin sharing content.

Now, these are the folks I met with two years ago about reporting on Open Source Software companies in Dallas. The lead business writer at the time told me he wouldn't do it because people's eyes glazed over when you mentioned Linux. He wrote story after story about the boyz in Redmond though.

What changed? Today, BitTorrent transfers account for one half of the traffic on the Internet. Andrew asked some penetrating questions too, like how do regulators enforce the enormity of the traffic? How does a user cope with the moral and legal issues? Are those things even relevant?

He also wrote that one can get whatever they want on the Internet today. Name it and it's yours. Just type in the name of the movie, song, TV show you want into Google with the word torrent and it's yours.

How's that for shifting the paradigm? This is not an article for innovators and early adopters. This is an article for the majority in the population. Yo momma got her hair died red. All from your friendly, conservative major newspaper from the Biblical thumbing south! That's all I have to say about that you folks from Greenbough, Alabamie. Now, go for it!

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The Pragmatic Programmers

Anonymous's picture

The Pragmatic Programmers also look like they're set to add some more titles to their Facets of Ruby line. James Gray has said that he's writing a book for them that should be announced soon, Ezra Zygmuntowicz also has a book on the way, and I've recently signed a contract with them for a Ruby related book. It looks like the PragProgs aren't going to be content to sit on their Ruby laurels.well, although I do small business(Lingerie Wholesale),but I still pay many attention to this. thanks.

LOTRO Gold

LOTRO Gold's picture

Or you will use your LOTRO Gold to add your power.

What's the bible got to do with it?

Anonymous's picture

I thought I'd toss in my "rude" flag.

What's the Bible have to do with it? It's always been open source, even before the birth of Stallman and Torvald.

I was born almost as North as you can go and stay in the US and I'd return if I had the chance, but the Alabama comments could have been done without.

That whole last paragraph really killed an interesting post.

Thanks for letting us know about the good mainstream coverage of BitTorrent.

What is your conclusion, exactly?

KeithInAugusta's picture

Are you just ridiculing people from the south? Perhaps you need a little Bible thumping of your own. Just admit you are incensed because Smith wouldn't write a story about a subject (Linux) that a MAJORITY of the population doesn't really care about. There are far more important things to read about and for all of their faults, the boys in Redmond do make a product that is easier to use and is more mainstream than Linux... And I say that as a huge Linux fan. Most people in rural areas (north, south, east, or west) don't write code. Why would they give a crap about Linux? All they care about is how to turn on the machine, look at some pretty graphics, hear the "hello" music, and do the "www" thing (as my mom says). Tweaking is far from their level of understanding and most Linux distros require that. I wish you people would stop getting your feelings hurt whenever something Linux gets shunned. It has a valuable place in the world and will become a more mainstream tool in the future. Just don't expect the non-computer saavy user to join in.

"All from your friendly,

Anonymous in N.C's picture

"All from your friendly, conservative major newspaper from the Biblical thumbing south!" Did you mean bible thumping, as in people who are pushy with their religious beliefs? I have never heard of bible or biblical thumbing. What does that mean?

Good Article...Bad Stereotyping...

Anonymous's picture

I Live in Anniston, AL. Yes, we have cows. We also have paved roads and those futuristic things called "automobiles". Plus, we also have a monthly LUG and a small group of hardened Unix/Linux gurus. So, if you're going to portray the north's image of the south (Moronic Farmers) you may want to add the south's image of the north (Unethical and Rude). You ever hear the one about the man from the south who ordered a pizza up north. The man from the south ordered a pizza "New York Style", and the waiter pulled out a gun and shot him. Something to think about. Stay away from the stereotypes please. Thanks.

south card

Anonymous's picture

I read the article and I didn't get your view of it. South = Moronic Farmers? Why is it always people from the south who are so willing to play the "south" card? I was more offended by the product the author used on his back. Relax a little, stop being such a rude hater.

Haha....Wow!

Anonymous's picture

Wow...It seems that I wasn't the only one a little set back by the comments. Also, I was FAR from offended. Anyway, life's much better when you can learn to laugh at yourself (Yes, I use the word "y'all" haha). Anyway, I apologize if I was sounding like a "hater", but, like it or not, the word "Linux" doesn't garner much respect outside of technical circles. Perhaps a step in changing this is to stay away from stereotypes in our articles, reviews, and yes, even blogs. Obviously, this is not the mountain Linux will die on, but, blatant immaturity like this is far from helping the general public's image of Linux.

What are you, blind or just stupid?

Anonymous's picture

"Yo momma got her hair died red. All from your friendly, conservative major newspaper from the Biblical thumbing south! That's all I have to say about that you folks from Greenbough, Alabamie. Now, go for it!"

That's not stereotyping? I'm from the north and saw it as stereotyping. It certainly didn't add any value to the article. You must be from Jersey or NYC where every other word starts with an 'F'.

Stop being so sensitive,

Anonymous's picture

Stop being so sensitive, stereotypes are fun because they are so true.

hola

hoteles's picture

Who is sensitive?

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