Readers' Choice Awards 2009

If you pick it, they will come.
Favorite Linux Book of All Time

Linux in a Nutshell by Ellen Siever, Stephen Spainhour, Stephen Figgins and Jessica P. Hekman(4%)

Honorable Mention

Just for Fun: The Story of an Accidental Revolutionary by Linus Torvalds and David Diamond (3%)

Running Linux by Matt Welsh, Matthias Kalle Dalheimer, Terry Dawson and Lar Kaufman (3%)

The Cathedral and the Bazaar by Eric S. Raymond (2%)

The Linux Bible by Christopher Negus (2%)

Last year, we limited the selection in this category to books published from 2007 to the date of the survey (February 2008). This year, we decided to try Favorite Linux Book of All Time, and the results didn't gel as easily. Because this category is so crowded, we decided to toss out the 10% rule for Honorable Mention and honor your top five books. Interestingly, two of your favorites were not technical guides but rather required reading for understanding the Linux phenomenon, namely Just for Fun: The Story of an Accidental Revolutionary, the story of Linus Torvalds' rise to fame, and The Cathedral and the Bazaar, Eric Raymond's seminal book on the Open Source movement. Rounding out the Honorable Mentions Running Linux and The Linux Bible. The information-overloaded among you meanwhile opted for the popular write-in candidates “Too many to choose” or “Very tough question”.

Favorite Linux Journal Column

Tie: Marcel Gagné's Cooking with Linux (19%) and Kyle Rankin's Hack and / (19%)

Honorable Mention

Dave Taylor's Work the Shell (10%)

Mick Bauer's Paranoid Penguin (10%)

Here is some Linux Journal lore for you. Our publication used to have a column called Kernel Korner, which many faithful readers certainly remember. Kernel Korner dominated the Favorite Linux Journal Column category from the awards' inception in 1996 until 2000. Things got competitive in 2001 when Marcel Gagné and his Cooking with Linux, the world's first column ever to pair practical (and hilarious) Linux advice with appropriate wine selections. Cooking with Linux has been so popular ever since that it won Favorite Linux Journal Column from 2001 to 2008, and last year, I suggested that “Marcel Gagné is going to have to be knocked off before anyone knocks him off the award stand.” My prediction was premature, because this year, although Marcel won this category again, he shares his title with Kyle Rankin's more recent Hack and / column. Believe it or not, Marcel and Kyle received the exact same number of votes, or 19% each. Congratulations are due to both excellent columnists who offer vastly different but equally useful content in their monthly musings. Meanwhile, Dave Taylor's Work the Shell and Mick Bauer's Paranoid Penguin are both popular with 10% of you, enough to award them Honorable Mention.

Linux Product of the Year

Android Platform and the T-Mobile G1 Phone (9%)

Honorable Mention

Ubuntu (8%)

KDE 4 (7%)

ASUS Eee PC (6%)

In the question for 2009 Linux Product of the Year, we didn't give you any suggestions. We left the responses 100% up to you. Naturally, this made nearly every response unique and left it up to us to categorize it. Nevertheless, it is safe to proclaim that your 2009 Linux Journal Product of the Year Award goes to the Android platform and its first commercial implementation, the T-Mobile G1 phone. The pair garnered 9% of your votes. Close behind, with 8% and Honorable Mention, was the Ubuntu Linux distribution, followed by the KDE 4 desktop with 7% and, finally, last year's winner, the ASUS Eee PC with 6%. Last year, the Eee PC reached an impressive 37% of the votes. Interestingly, the development of Android and the G1 phone, although popular and groundbreaking, didn't have quite the same dominant effect that the Eee PC had last year—nor did any other single product. This effect allowed you to remediate my lament from last year that “when Ubuntu releases yet another fantastic upgrade, our expectations are met and the buzz meter quickly subsides”. This year, Ubuntu got the respect it deserves in this category for revolutionizing the Linux desktop oh so gradually with each great upgrade.

Thanks to each and every one of you who participated in the voting.

James Gray is Linux Journal Products Editor and a graduate student in environmental sciences and management at Michigan State University. A Linux enthusiast since the mid-1990s, he currently resides in Lansing, Michigan, with his wife and cats.

______________________

James Gray is Products Editor for Linux Journal

Comments

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Firefox

Brandon2121's picture

Amazing how firefox has managed to stay on top of the game. In my opinion, it's because they stuck to what made them famous and kept doing it better. What sets them apart for me is the add-ons and plugins. FireFox, then, becomes a totally customizable browser. Not too many of those around. It's lightweight, too!

Brandon
CEO, http://theticketsguide.com

Great article!!

Anonymous's picture

As a linux noob, this article is of great help in finding out about whats popular in the linux scene. Thanks for this article!!

Am off to read Linux in a nutshell...

Nagios tops

Anonymous's picture

Nagios is a superb product. Totally deserves it's top ranking.

Python Bloomed Once Again

Slacker 12.2's picture

Wow since 2008 Python is blooming non-STOP!!
It won again, and in other articles/forums it also won!

Here take a look:
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/2008-linuxquestions.org-members-...

Well, I can't agree more! ^__^

LONG LIVE PYTHON!!

Favorite Primary Linux Distribution of Choice

PixelatedDwarf's picture

In the category of "Favorite Primary Linux Distribution of Choice" it is a hard choice - Are we talking about servers or workstations? Maybe break them down next time. Like many people I love Ubuntu for my workstations but I use CentOS/Red Hat for my servers.

no geany in IDE category

Anonymous's picture

The fact that the second place for favourite IDE is "others", means that the options given were not good enough. I wonder why geany was not included.

Are the full data available anywhere?

Aleve Sicofante's picture

I'd love to see the absolute number of votes, as well as the full ranking for each category. I'm especially intrigued about how many people voted for the Favorite Linux Distribution and what's Fedora's or OpenSuse ranking.

If voters are in the hundreds, this poll is definitely meaningless. If they are in the hundreds of thousands I'd give it more relevance.

Favorite Linux Distribution

Carlie Fairchild's picture

Here are the top 10:
Ubuntu (any flavor, Kubuntu, Edubuntu, etc.) 44.98%
Debian 9.78%
Fedora 7.96%
Red Hat 7.35%
CentOS 5.56%
Gentoo 5.50%
Novell/SuSE 5.46%
Arch Linux 4.35%
Mandriva 2.46%
Slackware 2.46%

(There were nearly 5,000 total participants in the survey.)

Carlie Fairchild is the publisher of Linux Journal.

Ubuntu

Anonymous's picture

I don't see what the appeal of Ubuntu is, don't people care about technical substance rather than flashy and if I may say so, ugly, desktops? I will keep using good ol' Red Hat-based Fedora (the best distro for gaming, and a leading-edge powerhouse that respects technology and doesn't care blindy about winning people over from Windows or Mac). Parlty since I consider Fedora the desktop king for not thinking that making you use a seperate version of the OS just to use KDE or XFCE instead of GNOME is a good idea. Other than that, great results!

Ubuntu as the desktop winner

daved1948's picture

It's true of course, Ubuntu on the desktop is not as techy as CentOS or Debian...but then, if Linux is to make the jump from "geek" to "user", it needs to get on a lot more desktops.

And to do that, it must be used by more and more non-technical end-users so that those at both ends of the scale (uber-tech and tech-less) can truly benefit by it's success.

The product needs to be excellent at both. And since Ubuntu "is" Linux in every sense, yet easy enough for a green end-user, I'd say you're getting what you want, and they're getting what they need.

To me, Ubuntu's rise is very exciting, and just what the doctor ordered. I'd bet it coincides with a growing number of Linux desktops more than it steals pure technical developers away from the other distros. But then, I have no real data to support that theory. I wonder if Linux Journal does?

Ubuntu has the potential to introduce Linux to non-Linux users. And isn't that what we want?

Early on, RedHat abandoned the post of desktop champion in favor of the server. They went where the $$ were to develop for a smaller, but critical market. And they did a good job of it.

Ubuntu on the other hand, targeted developing nations' hunger for a low or zero-cost alternative to Micro-Rip-Off's bug-ridden abomination for user's desktops. And they did a good job of that.

I'm happy.

Again...NO MINT

mtnbiker72's picture

If Linux Mint would have been an option, it would have far surpassed Debian for honorable mention. I can't believe the LJ Editors left that distro out of the running!!!

About as fair and balanced as Fox News

Mint

Carlie Fairchild's picture

The Fox News comment zings a little. ;-)

We select a list of top distros based on reader feedback throughout the year and of course always encourage write-ins.

Mint has indeed been gaining some ground, as has Sabayon and a few others. Lets pose the question to web readers today but split up "favorite distro" in to "favorite distro for your desktop" and "favorite distro for your servers". I think that could also prove interesting.

http://www.linuxjournal.com/content/what-your-favorite-linux-distribution-desktop

(We'll post the server question to the site some time next week.)

Thanks for your feedback!

Carlie Fairchild is the publisher of Linux Journal.

Linux Geek

Vmax's picture

Ok, your entirely too hot to be a Linux Geek.....

You must be a computer generated BOT !!!

So we have the results from

Mathews's picture

So we have the results from the readers for the Linux Journal Readers' Choice Awards for 2009! As usual there is one winner in each category with strong contenders being awarded the Honorable mentions Awards which could go up to here where they would have to get a minimum of 10% vote!! It is a wonderful way of both encouraging the users and the companies to keep on giving their best to their users who will be judging them according to their rapid prototyping performance - each complementing the other!!

Great stuff. Ubuntu + Gnome

Anonymous's picture

Great stuff. Ubuntu + Gnome are doing quite well.

Deleting comments that don't

Anonymous's picture

Deleting comments that don't praise ubuntu, I didn't know you were such an ubuntu fanboy.

Authors don't delete comments

Webmistress's picture

We only delete comments that are obvious spam comments (typically full of odd-looking links, etc). It is possible that a legitimate comment was accidentally deleted due to some overly aggressive spam cleaning though. If this ever happens, please feel free to re-post. This is definitely not a frequent occurrence.

Katherine Druckman is webmistress at LinuxJournal.com. You might find her on Twitter or at the Southwest Drupal Summit

Nagios

Anonymous's picture

Nagios is truely a great project and product.
Although Ethan should allow more input from the community and start to think of building a DB backend, so a frontend can be developed away from the program logic, also this would make 3rd party addons to be more streamlined and orchestrated through standard api's.
If you look at how old Nagios is, and what progress it has made(roadmap?), it's not very impressive compared to the other monitoring suites and where they are on this moment.
Don't get me wrong, a fantastic product but let's evolve please!

Date

Guezala's picture

Hi guys... like this article but I'm pretty sure it's only just May 2009?

Linux Compatible Online Backup and File & Folder Sync FREE

Anonymous's picture

Hello,
I just wanted to inform you that SpiderOak Inc offer a free Linux compatible Online Backup for a multitude of distributions at https://spideroak.com

2GB of storage Free for life, Online Backup, Sync, Storage, Access and Share for cross-platform use (Windows, Mac and Linux) so check us out!

Daniel
SpiderOak Inc Marketing Manager

Dropbox

Anonymous's picture

Dropbox (https://www.getdropbox.com/referrals/NTU2ODAyNDk) offers the same thing...

Sorry for 3 part post, stupid spam filter robot

Tom Chiverton's picture

See gruchalski.com/2009/04/28/vote-for-flex-builder-for-linux/ and make sure you vote in bugs.adobe.com/jira/browse/FB-19053

(odd, stripping the http:// allows this final part to pass the spam filter)

Editors: Fancy doing an

Tom Chiverton's picture

Editors: Fancy doing an actual article on this strange decision ? Maybe you could ask what 'not enough requisition for the product' means - given you can't buy dedicated Linux licenses (only apply Windows or Mac ones) and that the bug is *the most voted* in their bug tracker, in only a week of being open.

Given "Favourite Platform

Tom Chiverton's picture

Given "Favourite Platform for Developing Rich Internet Apps" is Adobe's Air product, it seems a really poor time to find out Adobe are no longer working on the Linux version of the 'Builder' IDE for Air (and Flex) applications !

Mr. Gray's Editorializing Has No Place In This Article.

Jay Dugger's picture

James Gray's comment "Finally, this author wishes to express his dismay at the significant number of disparaging remarks in this survey toward green solutions..." disappoints me.

While understandable, given his profession and assuming his legitimate concern for our mutual home, it has no place in a column devoted to reporting poll results. His irrelevant editorializing should have been deleted before publication by another editor. That failure also disappoints me.

Linux Journal provides value to its readers by remaining on-topic, which Mr. Gray did not do. If I care to read about the environment, I can reveal that preference by spending my time and money elsewhere.

Sometimes the delete key serves best.

I am surprised that there

zak89's picture

I am surprised that there was even noticeable response from the not-so-green angle. I had thought that all thinking people had vanished from this planet.

I doubt Linux Mint would have beaten Debian. Mint is a great distro (Ubuntu done right, as I say), but Debian is too entrenched for now.

Yes. Clearly this has been

Anonymous's picture

Yes. Clearly this has been a travesty, an insult to all people of good taste and refinement. In fact, the mere shock of such an affront to my senses has left me in a state of bewilderment. Where am I? Who are you? Why are you such an uptight jackass?

I fear I may never truly know.

I second that, he's an

Anonymous's picture

I second that, he's an uptight jackass

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