One Box. Sixteen Trillion Bytes.

 in
Build your own 16-Terabyte file server with hardware RAID.
Conclusion

I have been using this system in production for several months and have consumed only a fraction of the available space:

# df -t xfs
Filesystem    1K-blocks      Used    Available  Use% Mounted on
/dev/sdb1     13566738304 2245371020 11321367284 17% /backup

I am quite happy with the result, as I have plenty of room to add more systems to the backup schedule, and I am confident I will not lose any backups due to hardware failures.

Eric Pearce is the IT Lead for AmberPoint, Inc, an SOA governance software company based in Oakland, California. He has authored several books on UNIX and Windows system administration for O'Reilly & Associates.

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A Problem with device driver programming

mety's picture

hello
i am writing a driver for a board which uses AMCC s5935 and a EEPROM.
i use lspci -x to see the card`s information but i see the wrong values. i have tested it on MS DOS and Windows but i see this wrong values again.
once i prepared a Windriver for this card and i saw the correct values . i wanna write a program on linux and i need help .what should i do?
i see a wrong number on Base Address Register0.
but it must be something else.
i must add BaseAddressRegister0 with 0x3c and read its address but i read something wrong and i am confused.
i would be very great full if u could help me.
thanx

speed test on similar system

hjmangalam's picture

Readers of this might be interested in some benchmarks on a similar system broken down by filesystem, types of apps, #s of disks, types of RAID, etc.

The Storage Brick - Fast, Cheap, Reliable Terabytes

http://moo.nac.uci.edu/~hjm/sb/index.html

Cheers
Harry

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