The Latest

January 2014 Issue of Linux Journal: Security

Lapsang Souchong!

Back when we were kids, "security" meant little more than having a secret password to keep little siblings out of the treehouse. more>>

2013 Book Roundup

I'm always amazed to hear about the death of the publishing industry. True, books and (gulp) magazines are often fighting for their lives, and the state of journalism is in tatters. more>>

Create a Mini PC or Server with Olimex's Olinuxino A13/A13Micro

Olimex is a Bulgarian company known for its innovative hobbyist products. It has a wide array of microcontroller-based products, ranging from the small Arduino clones to the very able system that has the Allwinner A13 microcontroller as its brain. In this article, I describe how you can create a working Linux system for the Olinuxino A13 and Olinuxino A13Micro from scratch. more>>

Be a Mechanic...with Android and Linux!

"Check Engine Soon"—that little orange light on your car's instrument panel is possibly one of the more annoying things about modern automobiles. Ever had it pop on during a trip and wonder whether it was just something mundane, like your gas cap being loose, or whether it's something deathly serious and a piston could come shooting out the side of your engine block at any time? more>>

Compojure

In my last article, I started discussing Compojure, a Web framework written in the Clojure language. Clojure already has generated a great deal of excitement among software developers, in that it combines the beauty and expressive elegance of Lisp with the efficiency and ubiquity of the Java Virtual Machine (JVM). more>>

Protect Your Ports with a Reverse Proxy

In a previous article, I discussed Apache Tomcat, which is the ideal way to run Java applications from your server. I explained that you can run those apps from Tomcat's default 8080 port, or you can configure Tomcat to use port 80. But, what if you want to run a traditional Web server and host Java apps on port 80? The answer is to run a reverse proxy. more>>

New Products

Please send information about releases of Linux-related products to newproducts@linuxjournal.com or New Products c/o Linux Journal, PO Box 980985, Houston, TX 77098. Submissions are edited for length and content.

Non-Linux FOSS: Let's Make Music Together

Just because you're not on Linux doesn't mean you can't have awesome open-source tools. I was having a conversation with a friend and reader (Don Crowder: @eldergeek) on Twitter the other day about music theory. Yes, I'm not just a computer nerd, but a music/math nerd too. Anyway after our conversation, I started looking for an open-source program for creating sheet music. more>>

Best. Cake. Ever.

Redditor azimir submitted a photo of his birthday cake to reddit, and I couldn't help but share with the whole class. From the comments, I gather that the baker's son is a Linux geek and hooked him up with some code to decorate the cake. more>>

AIDE—Developing for Android on Android

Android, as a platform, is one of the fastest growing on the planet. It is available on smartphones and a series of different tablet sizes. Most devices also include a full spectrum of sensors that are available to programs you install, so it's a very inviting platform for development. more>>

Two Pi R

Although many people are excited about the hardware-hacking possibilities with the Raspberry Pi, one of the things that interests me most is the fact that it is essentially a small low-power Linux server I can use to replace other Linux servers I already have around the house. more>>

A Handy U-Boot Trick

Embedded developers working on kernels or bare-metal programs often go through several development cycles. Each time the developer modifies the code, the code has to be compiled, the ELF (Executable and Linkable Format)/kernel image has to be copied onto the SD card, and the card then has to be transferred from the PC to the development board and rebooted. more>>

GIMP Shmimp, Give Me a Browser

Don't get me wrong, I love The GIMP. We all love The GIMP, as our Readers' Choice awards show this month. If I'm being completely honest, however, I rarely have the need for such a powerful application. Usually, regardless of what computer system I'm on, I pick Pixlr as my image editing program. more>>

Tinker with Molecular Dynamics for Fun and Profit

Molecular dynamics computations make up a very large proportion of the computer cycles being used in science today. For those of you who remember chemistry and or thermodynamics, you should recall that all of the calculations you made were based on treating the material in question as a homogeneous mass where each part of the mass simply has the average value of the relevant properties. more>>

Android Candy: Free, Family, Fun—Fantastic

I've mentioned geocaching before, but if you've never taken the time to go out and do it, you're really missing out. Whether you're dragging your family through two feet of snow in the middle of the woods (yeah, I did that last year, I'm still not sure they've forgiven me) or following your GPS around a parking lot looking for a tiny micro-cache, geocaching is fun. more>>

The Geek's Guide to the Coolest 2013 Holiday Gifts

If you're like most of the Linux Journal staff, you probably have lots of holiday shopping left to do this year. We hope this list helps you impress your favorite people.

Gift image via Shutterstock.com.

A Plexible Pi

If, like me, you've jumped onto the Plex bandwagon with both feet, you've probably discovered how difficult it is to make a standalone Plex player. Sure, you can install an entire OS, then auto-start the Plex program in full screen, but it's not as simple as installing the XBMC distro, or even OpenELEC. If you own a Raspberry Pi, that has all changed. more>>

Linux Kernel News - November 2013

Mainline Release (Linus's tree) News

3.13-rc2 has been released on November 29th. This release candidate includes several small bug fixes. Please read the 3.13-rc2 release announcement. more>>

Mars Needs Women

Linux is pretty much an all-male project. Let's change that. more>>

IBM Will Minimize Impact of Future Disasters

Not even Mighty Big Blue can stop a hurricane. But. IBM and Marist College are testing a new cloud computing innovation that could help prevent disruptions in voice and data communications services caused by hurricanes and other natural disasters. more>>

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