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SIDUS—the Solution for Extreme Deduplication of an Operating System

SIDUS (Single-Instance Distributing Universal System) was developed at Centre Blaise Pascal (Ecole normale supérieure de Lyon, Lyon, France), where one administrator alone is in charge of 180 stations. Emmanuel Quemener started SIDUS in February 2010, and he significantly cut his workload for administering this park of stations. SIDUS is now in use at the supercomputing centre PSM more>>

Linux Graphics News

Last October, our last look at graphics focused on the plans laid at September's X Developer's Conference. In the three months since then, these plans have come to fruition, reasserting the continuing relevance of X.org compared with Wayland and other compositing display servers. more>>

Free On Demand Webinar Available: Cloud Enabled Datacenters

Learn the 5 critical success factors to accelerate IT service delivery in a cloud enabled datacenter

Today's organizations face an unparalleled rate of change. Cloud enabled data centers are increasingly seen as a way to accelerate IT service delivery and increase utilization of resources while reducing operating expenses. more>>

Zato—Agile ESB, SOA, REST and Cloud Integrations in Python

Zato is a Python-based platform for integrating applications and exposing back-end services to front-end clients. It's an ESB (Enterprise Service Bus) and an application server focused on data integrations. more>>

Non-Linux FOSS: Persistence of Vision Raytracer (POV-Ray)

Back in the mid-1990s, a college friend (hi Russ!) and I would put our old 8088 computers to work rendering ray-traced images for days—literally. The end result would be, by today's standards, incredibly low resolution and not terribly interesting. Still, the thought of a computer system creating realistic photos from nothing more than math equations was fascinating. more>>

Zedge, for All Your Annoying Ringtones!

I really don't understand folks who use songs as their ringtones. Isn't it annoying or confusing when the song comes on the radio? If it's your favorite song, don't you get desensitized to it when you listen to the CD (or digital equivalent of CD)? Nevertheless, you probably hear dozens of ringtones every day. Those probably vary from "super annoying" to "what a cool ringtone". more>>

Linux Kernel News - December 2013

Mainline Release (Linus's tree) News

The last 3.13 release candidate for 2013 came out on December 29th. This 3.13-rc6 is small with just 81 commits to infiniband, gpu, cpufreq, libata, and block drivers in addition to a few small filesystem fixes, and ARM SoC related changes. more>>

Taking Fractals off the Page

Fractals are one of the weirder things you may come across when studying computer science and programming algorithms. more>>

Blu-ray Encryption—Why Most People Pirate Movies

I get a fair amount of e-mail from readers asking how a person could do "questionable" things due to limitations imposed by DRM. Whether it's how to strip DRM from ebooks, how to connect to Usenet or how to decrypt video, I do my best to point folks in the right direction with lots of warnings and disclaimers. The most frustrating DRM by far has been with Blu-ray discs. more>>

Returning to Ground from the Web's Clouds

The Net as we know it today first became visible to me in March 1994, when I was among several hundred other tech types gathered at Esther Dyson's PC Forum conference in Arizona. more>>

January 2014 Issue of Linux Journal: Security

Lapsang Souchong!

Back when we were kids, "security" meant little more than having a secret password to keep little siblings out of the treehouse. more>>

2013 Book Roundup

I'm always amazed to hear about the death of the publishing industry. True, books and (gulp) magazines are often fighting for their lives, and the state of journalism is in tatters. more>>

Create a Mini PC or Server with Olimex's Olinuxino A13/A13Micro

Olimex is a Bulgarian company known for its innovative hobbyist products. It has a wide array of microcontroller-based products, ranging from the small Arduino clones to the very able system that has the Allwinner A13 microcontroller as its brain. In this article, I describe how you can create a working Linux system for the Olinuxino A13 and Olinuxino A13Micro from scratch. more>>

Be a Mechanic...with Android and Linux!

"Check Engine Soon"—that little orange light on your car's instrument panel is possibly one of the more annoying things about modern automobiles. Ever had it pop on during a trip and wonder whether it was just something mundane, like your gas cap being loose, or whether it's something deathly serious and a piston could come shooting out the side of your engine block at any time? more>>

Compojure

In my last article, I started discussing Compojure, a Web framework written in the Clojure language. Clojure already has generated a great deal of excitement among software developers, in that it combines the beauty and expressive elegance of Lisp with the efficiency and ubiquity of the Java Virtual Machine (JVM). more>>

Protect Your Ports with a Reverse Proxy

In a previous article, I discussed Apache Tomcat, which is the ideal way to run Java applications from your server. I explained that you can run those apps from Tomcat's default 8080 port, or you can configure Tomcat to use port 80. But, what if you want to run a traditional Web server and host Java apps on port 80? The answer is to run a reverse proxy. more>>

New Products

Please send information about releases of Linux-related products to newproducts@linuxjournal.com or New Products c/o Linux Journal, PO Box 980985, Houston, TX 77098. Submissions are edited for length and content.

Non-Linux FOSS: Let's Make Music Together

Just because you're not on Linux doesn't mean you can't have awesome open-source tools. I was having a conversation with a friend and reader (Don Crowder: @eldergeek) on Twitter the other day about music theory. Yes, I'm not just a computer nerd, but a music/math nerd too. Anyway after our conversation, I started looking for an open-source program for creating sheet music. more>>

Best. Cake. Ever.

Redditor azimir submitted a photo of his birthday cake to reddit, and I couldn't help but share with the whole class. From the comments, I gather that the baker's son is a Linux geek and hooked him up with some code to decorate the cake. more>>

AIDE—Developing for Android on Android

Android, as a platform, is one of the fastest growing on the planet. It is available on smartphones and a series of different tablet sizes. Most devices also include a full spectrum of sensors that are available to programs you install, so it's a very inviting platform for development. more>>

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Webinar
Linux Backup and Recovery Webinar

Most companies incorporate backup procedures for critical data, which can be restored quickly if a loss occurs. However, fewer companies are prepared for catastrophic system failures, in which they lose all data, the entire operating system, applications, settings, patches and more, reducing their system(s) to “bare metal.” After all, before data can be restored to a system, there must be a system to restore it to.

In this one hour webinar, learn how to enhance your existing backup strategies for better disaster recovery preparedness using Storix System Backup Administrator (SBAdmin), a highly flexible bare-metal recovery solution for UNIX and Linux systems.

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Sponsored by Storix