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Physics Analysis Workstation

CERN is the European Laboratory for Particle Physics. It has been in the news quite a bit lately with the discovery of the Higgs Boson at the Large Hadron Collider. Something that many people may not know is that it also has a long tradition of developing software for scientific use. more>>

The AtoMiC Toolkit!

If you're a cord cutter (and a nerd), you most likely have a server or two dedicated to serving and possibly retrieving videos from the Internet. Programs like Kodi and Plex are awesome for media delivery; however, there's more to a complete system than just playing the videos. more>>

GeekGuide technical books

Practical Books for the Most Technical People on the Planet

Linux Journal editors are proud to introduce GeekGuides-- practical ebooks for the most technical people on the planet. more>>

diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development

When you run a program as setuid, it runs with all the permissions of that user. And if the program spawns new processes, they inherit the same permissions. Not so with filesystem capabilities. When you run a program with a set of capabilities, the processes it spawns do not have those capabilities by default; they must be given explicitly. more>>


Today's computational needs in diverse fields cannot be met by a single computer. Such areas include weather forecasting, astronomy, aerodynamics simulations for cars, material sciences and computational drug design. This makes it necessary to combine multiple computers into one system, a so-called computer cluster, to obtain the required computational power. more>>

Cinnamon 2.6 Released

Cinnamon, one the default desktops of Linux Mint (alongside Mate) has recently been updated. Version 2.6 has a boatload of fixes, tweaks and improvements. Here are some of them: more>>

Gettin' Sticky with It

In last month's issue, I talked about Linux permissions (see "It's Better to Ask Forgiveness..." in the May 2015 UpFront section). I could have covered SUID, GUID and sticky bit in the same article, but it seemed like a lot to cover in one sitting. more>>

Android Candy: Cloud Bonding

Although the title might sound like some new-fangled tech jargon, I'm actually referring to a fairly simple Android app called "Unclouded." If you're a Dropbox user who also has things stored in Google Drive, Unclouded is a single interface to multiple file syncing backends. more>>


Because you're a reader of Linux Journal, you probably already know that Linux has a rich virtualization ecosystem. KVM is the de facto standard, and VirtualBox is widely used for desktop virtualization. Veterans should remember Xen (it's still in a good shape, by the way), and there is also VMware (which isn't free but runs on Linux as well). more>>

A Machine for Keeping Secrets?

[I can't begin to describe all the things Vinay Gupta does. Fortunately, he does, at more>>

Non-Linux FOSS: Vienna, Not Just for Sausages

Although the technology itself has been around for a while, RSS is still the way most people consume Web content. When Google Reader was ended a few years back, there was a scramble to find the perfect alternative. You may remember my series of articles on Tiny Tiny RSS, Comma Feed and a handful of other Google Reader wannabes. more>>

June 2015 Issue of Linux Journal: Networking

Two Cups, One String

Whenever I watch episodes of Battlestar Galactica, it breaks my heart when they avoid Cylon hacking by disconnecting all networks. more>>

My Humble Little Game Collection

I currently have the flu. Not the "sorta queasy" stomach flu, but the full out Influenza with fever, aches and delirium-ridden nightmares. Bouts of crippling illness tend to be my only chance to play games. Thankfully, since I'm such a terrible gamer, being sick doesn't really hurt my skills very much! more>>

New Linux Based OS Brings Internet of Things Closer to Reality

The "Internet of Things," or IoT, has the potential to change the way we interact with the devices and objects in our homes and lives.

The IoT is the idea that all of the devices and gadgets that you interact with could be connected to the internet. more>>

Non-Linux FOSS: All the Bitcoin, None of the Bloat

I love Bitcoin. Ever since I first discovered it in 2010 and mined thousands of them, I've been hooked on the technology, the concept and even the software. (Sadly, I sold most of those thousands of Bitcoin when they were less than a dollar. I'm still kicking myself.) One of the frustrations with using Bitcoin, however, is that the blockchain has gotten so large. more>>

Dr Hjkl on the Command Line

The first time I used vi was in a college programming course. It was the default editor on the computer lab's UNIX systems we used to compile our assignments. I remember when our professor first introduced vi and explained that you used the hjkl keys to move your cursor around instead of the arrow keys. more>>

Initializing and Managing Services in Linux: Past, Present and Future

One of the most crucial pieces of any UNIX-like operating system is the init dæmon process. In Linux, this process is started by the kernel, and it's the first userspace process to spawn and the last one to die during shutdown. more>>

Raspberry Pi competitor

Goodbye, Pi. Hello, C.H.I.P.

A new mini-computer is on the way, and it looks like it may be the Raspberry Pi killer we've all been waiting for (sorry Pi). C.H.I.P. is its name, and it looks set to wipe the floor with its established competitor on several counts:

1. It's completely open source. I don't just mean the software, either. more>>

Using Hiera with Puppet

With Hiera, you can externalize your systems' configuration data and easily understand how those values are assigned to your servers. With that data separated from your Puppet code, you then can encrypt sensitive values, such as passwords and keys. more>>