The Latest

What I See for LJ 2.0: in a Word, Community

It has been too long, but I was at least one of the founders of the Seattle UNIX User's Group. I remember the first meeting well. It took place at Seattle University, and our guest speaker was Bill Joy. He impressed me in that he had a huge pile of overhead transparencies (remember, this was in the 1980s), asked a few questions of the group, selected some of them and started talking. more>>

Emacs

Emacs for Science

I typically cover software packages that do actual calculations to advance scientific knowledge, but here I'm exploring a slightly stranger tool in the arsenal of scientific computation. more>>

Let's talk advertising

This is the first in a series of posts in which members of our still-small staff raise topics for discussion. more>>

How-to Take the Plunge and Replace the "I'm not a programmer" Mantra

For the past few years, the bulk of my consulting work has been in corporate training. Many of the participants in my courses are people who have been developing software for years already and simply want to learn new languages and techniques. more>>

Ansible: the Automation Framework That Thinks Like a Sysadmin

I've written about and trained folks on various DevOps tools through the years, and although they're awesome, it's obvious that most of them are designed from the mind of a developer. There's nothing wrong with that, because approaching configuration management programmatically is the whole point. more>>

Now What?

Linux Journal was a print magazine for 17+ years, then a digital one for the next 7+. What shall we be now? That's the Big Question, and there are many answers, some of which are already settled. more>>

Linux Journal is back!

Happy New Year- Welcome to Linux Journal 2.0!

Talk about a Happy New Year. The reason: it turns out we're not dead. In fact, we're more alive than ever, thanks to a rescue by readers—specifically, by the hackers who run Private Internet Access (PIA) VPN, a London Trust Media company. more>>

[Updated: LJ is back!] Linux Journal Ceases Publication

On January 1, 2018 Linux Journal was saved and brought back to life by a company called London Trust Media, the parent company of Private Internet Access. The comeback issue of Linux Journal has a release date of March 15, 2018. The article below, originally published in early December of 2017, is preserved for history.

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Kyle Rankin

So Long, and Thanks for All the Bash

It was the summer of 2007 and I was at Linux World Expo in San Francisco. I had just finished updating the second edition of Knoppix Hacks and in addition to attending the conference I was there to promote it and my other books at the O'Reilly booth. Somehow I got word that Linux Journal was looking for new authors and was holding an event at a nearby bar later that day. more>>

Banana Backups

In the September 2016 issue, I wrote an article called "Papa's Got a Brand New NAS" where I described how I replaced my rackmounted gear with a small, low-powered ARM device—the Odroid XU4. more>>

Zentera Systems, Inc.'s CoIP Security Enclave

On the heels of being crowned "Cool Vendor in Cloud Security" by Gartner, Zentera Systems, Inc., announced an upgrade to its flagship CoIP Security Enclave solution. more>>

Sysadmin 101: Patch Management

A few articles ago, I started a Sysadmin 101 series to pass down some fundamental knowledge about systems administration that the current generation of junior sysadmins, DevOps engineers or "full stack" developers might not learn otherwise. I had thought that I was done with the series, but then the WannaCry malware came out and exposed some of the poor patch management practices still more>>

pfSense: Not Linux, Not Bad

Through the years, I've used all sorts of router and firewall solutions at home and at work. For home networks, I usually recommend something like DD-WRT, OpenWRT or Tomato on an off-the-shelf router. For business, my recommendations typically are something like a Ubiquiti router or a router/firewall solution like Untangled or ClearOS. more>>

NETGEAR 48-Port Gigabit Smart Managed Plus Switch (GS750E)

More than ever, small to mid-sized businesses demand and rely on their networks to carry out mission-critical business activities. As always, however, budgets and expertise constrain these companies from using complex managed switches to run their networks. more>>

New Hope for Digital Identity

Identity is personal. You need to start there.

In the natural world where we live and breathe, personal identity can get complicated, but it's not broken. If an Inuit family from Qikiqtaaluk wants to name their kid Anuun or Issorartuyok, they do, and the world copes. If the same kid later wants to call himself Steve, he does. Again, the world copes. So does Steve. more>>

DivvyCloud Platform for VMware Cloud on AWS

DivvyCloud's unique niche in the IT ecosystem is helping organizations automate and manage their multi-cloud infrastructure at scale. more>>

Slicing Scientific Data

I've covered scientific software in previous articles that either analyzes image information or actually generates image data for further analysis. In this article, I introduce a tool that you can use to analyze images generated as part of medical diagnostic work. more>>

Linux Journal November 2017

Arrogance, the Biggest Linux Security Problem

Linux is no longer an obscure platform avoided by those with malicious intent. more>>