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Rebooting the Magic Way

If you have ever had a hard drive fail on a remote server you may remember the feeling you had after trying to issue the following commands: more>>

Product Spotlight: Virtualization for High-End Computing

ScaleMP's vSMP Foundation aggregation platform enables the creation of high-end x86-based symmetric multiprocessor (SMP) systems, providing superior performance at prices significantly lower than traditional SMPs and comparable to managed x86 clusters. more>>

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Remote Application Deployment with NX

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The X Window System is a magnificent platform for many uses, but using it to run an application over a slow network is nearly impossible. This is an introduction to NX, a technology that makes remote applications fly even over commodity internet. more>>

Google Drops $300,000 on Open Source

Google — the powerhouse synonymous with search — has just upped its Open Source support to the tune of more than a quarter of a million dollars, with a $300,000 donation to Oregon State University's Open Source Lab. more>>

It's Sir Penguin, and Where's My Fish?

Every once in a while here at Breaking News, we like to indulge in a tangent to bring you interesting news that isn't exactly about Linux and Open Source. In that spirit, we bring you a rather unusual story out of Edinburgh, Scotland, where last Friday a penguin — sadly, not named Tux — was formally knighted. more>>

Use Nagios to Check Your Zypper

If you use Nagios to monitor your system and run openSUSE on a remote server the bash script presented here will check for online updates and is designed to be run by Nagios so that the result will appear on the Nagios service-detail page. more>>

What do you use to run Windows applications on your Linux desktop?

Cedega 1% (19 votes) Crossover 4% (62 votes) VirtualBox 19% (311 votes) VMWare 16% (262 votes) Wine 39% (641 votes) Other (please tell us in the comments what you're using) 2% (35 votes) I don't need or want to run Windows apps on my Linux desktop 20% (333 votes) Total votes: 1663

Google Finally Coughs Up the Kit

After issuing a two-line reply in response to a petition signed by more than two hundred Android developers, Google has finally gotten around to releasing the Software Development Kits it hid from programmers for months. more>>

NGINX instead of Apache?

My friend Mario in Costa Rica sent me a short email about NGINX (pronounced engine-X). It is a web server and a bit more written by Igor Sysoev in Russia. Clearly, it isn't for everyone but if you have a very busy site that needs load balancing and some other performance stuff, it looks pretty interesting. more>>

Transparency is just as important

One of the advantages, touted by the Open Source community is that you can read the source code and make changes to it if you need to. Now to be honest, how many of us even bother to look at the source code? Come on, fess up. Yes, that is about what I thought. more>>

Raleigh, We Have a Problem

Something is going on at Fedora Project central, but what exactly it is, we don't quite know. more>>

Linux Journal Flickr Pool Roundup

Linux Journal's Flickr pool regularly brings in fun photos from readers around the world. more>>

Linux Leader Expounds on His Colorful Comments

Somewhat known for his vivid — and sometimes vituperative — commentary, Linus Torvalds is no stranger to controversy. That experience may do him well this week, as the torches and pitchforks have come out and are marching his way after an interview with Network World reignited the flames fanned by last month's colorful commentary on security. more>>

Music Education With Linux Sound Tools, Redux

Four years ago I wrote an article for Linux Journal about my use of Linux software for music instruction. A lot has changed since then, so I thought I should update that article to reflect my current use of Linux in my work as a music teacher. I'll follow the presentation of materials as I organized it in the original article, but first I'll share some observations about the changing nature of my trade. more>>

android

Google Brushes Off "Outside" Android Devs...Again

The turmoil that began just over a month ago with a mis-addressed email has boiled over again for Google, after the company issued what was termed "verbal silence" in reply to a petition from more than 200 Android developers. more>>

Looking for Python Programmers to Change the World

Ten years ago, the then CEO of Ericsson in Sweden wrote an internal article about digital convergence. He stated that within a very short time, all data produced in an analog way such as books, music, photographs, newspapers and so forth would cease to exist. Instead all content would become digital and we would render, view and listen to digital formats. more>>

MIT Students Bound and Gagged by Power-Mad Massachusetts Agency, Orwellian Magistrate

The big story in security circles this week has been the plight of three MIT students all-but-imprisoned by officials of Boston's transport system with the help of a Federal judge who — by all appearances — has somehow missed reading the First Amendment in his twenty-two years on the bench. more>>

The DNS Bug: Why You Should Care

It's not every day that the New York Times writes articles about the Domain Name System, but then again this DNS bug is anything but normal. more>>

What Comes After the Windows Era?

As a computer journalist for the last 25 years, I've received a lot of review copies of software. As something of an obsessive magpie, I've tended to keep most of it, “for reference”. Until yesterday, that is, when I finally threw out all those copies of OS/2, Lotus SmartSuite, and my entire collection of Microsoft software. This included Windows NT 3.5, Windows 2000, Microsoft Office and many, many more. What's makes this little spring-cleaning exercise particularly apt as well as cathartic is that all of us - and not just me - may finally be witnessing the end of the Windows era. more>>

Monitoring Processes with Kill

If you have a process ID but aren't sure whether it's valid, you can use the most unlikely of candidates to test it: the kill command. If you don't see any reference to this on the kill(1) man page, check the info pages. The man/info page states that signal 0 is special and that the exit code from kill tells whether a signal could be sent to the specified process (or processes). more>>