The Latest

April 2013 Issue of Linux Journal: High Performance Computing

When I was in college, there was a rich kid down the hall who had a computer with 16MB of RAM. Before you scoff, you need to think back to 1993. more>>

Wi-Fi Mini Honeypot

Do you have an old, unused wireless router collecting dust? Have some fun and make a Wi-Fi honeypot with it! more>>

Configuring One-Time Password Authentication with OTPW

Password authentication contains a lot of assumptions about security and trust. Encrypted SSH tunnels and public key verification are two common ways to ensure that your password is not compromised in transit. But, what if it's the computer you're currently typing on that can't be trusted? more>>

How to Deploy A Server

When I write my column, I try to stick to specific hacks or tips you can use to make life with Linux a little easier. Usually, I describe with pretty specific detail how to accomplish a particular task including command-line and configuration file examples. This time, however, I take a step off this tried-and-true path of tech tips and instead talk about more-general, high-level concepts, strategies and, frankly, personal opinions about systems administration. more>>

Android Candy: Pocket

Most people are familiar with Instapaper and Read It Later. Those types of services are great for tagging Web articles for later reading, and in the case of Read It Later (now called "Pocket"), they do a wonderful job of copying articles off-line for reading when the Internet isn't available. more>>

Webinar: Storage

Webinar this week: Storage

We have a webinar coming up this week -- this one is all about storage. Join us Thursday, March 28, 4:00 P.M. Eastern Time (8:00 P.M. GMT). The webinar is free to all. Register now at http://lnxjr.nl/ANSYSsim328. more>>

New Products

Please send information about releases of Linux-related products to newproducts@linuxjournal.com or New Products c/o Linux Journal, PO Box 980985, Houston, TX 77098. Submissions are edited for length and content.

SIGALRM Timers and Stdin Analysis

It's not hard to create functions to ensure that your script doesn't run forever. But what if you want portions to be timed while others can take as long as they need? Not so fast, Dave explains in his latest Work the Shell. more>>

Tweet About Your Pi!

 We're looking for quick blurbs about what you've done with Raspberry Pi. If you send us a quick description, and maybe a photo, we'll pick our favorites and publish them in our upcoming Raspberry Pi issue!

  more>>

Speed Up Your Drupal Development Using Installations and Distributions

Do you find yourself repeating the same steps whenever you start a new Drupal project? Do you always download and enable the same modules, and make the same configuration changes every time? As we start doing more and more Drupal projects at Nomensa, I noticed that we were doing exactly this, so I started to look into ways to streamline our initial project setup process. more>>

Design Your Own Rocket

A lot of the software packages I've covered in recent articles have been focused strictly on doing computations on your machine, separate from the real world. So in this article, I explore how to use your computer to design something you can build and use in the real world: your own model rocket. more>>

Shell Game

Many of the cool things in Linux Journal require the use of the command line. For us Linux users, that's generally not a big deal, because we have a terminal window readily available. Some of the time, however, it's helpful to have a shell account on an Internet host somewhere. more>>

Real-Time Messaging

Want to send messages to all the browsers connected to your site? The pub-sub paradigm, run through Web sockets, might be just the solution. more>>

Book Excerpt: DevOps Troubleshooting: Linux Server Best Practices

This excerpt is from the book, 'DevOps Troubleshooting: Linux Server Best Practices' by Kyle Rankin, published by Pearson/Addison-Wesley Professional, ISBN 0321832043, Nov 2012, Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. more>>

Phonegap Application Development

How many times have you heard, "there's an app for that"? But sometimes, there actually isn't "an app for that", or the apps that do exist don't meet your needs. As Linux users, we tend to like to scratch our own itches, and if that means we write some code to do it, so be it. more>>

Linux Showdown

Contest Takes SXSW Experience Outside of Austin

Spring Break is upon us, and the destination of choice for geeks to take their annual spring sojourn is the South by Southwest Interactive Festival in Austin.  Not all those who wish to go will get the expense approved and instead will end up stuck sifting through a barrage of blog posts and event hashtags in order to get their SXSW fix. more>>

Creating and Theming a Custom Content Type with Drupal 7

One of the great new things about Drupal 7 is that it's now easier to customize your site content. In Drupal 6, you typically had to use the CCK (Content Construction Kit) module for fine-grained control in customizing content, but that has been folded into core for Drupal 7. Drupal 7 is now a true content management framework (CMF). more>>

Android for Independence

At some point in the early 2000s, I got my wife a Nokia phone with a keyboard, so we could text each other. It was a great little phone, not hard to use or understand, but she texted me only once with it, to send the word "no". Then, in late 2007, not long after the iPhone came out, she told me she wanted one. Why? more>>

Finally, "The Cloud" Means Something

Few jargonistic terms have annoyed me as much as, "The Cloud." When the term was first coined, its meaning was ambiguous at best. For some companies, it meant shared web hosting (but with a cooler sounding name). For others it was simply, "let us host your servers in our datacenter, which we now refer to as a cloud." more>>

Crashplan, the Only Reason I Install Java

I'm the sort of person who doesn't like to install Java. I actually don't like to install Flash either, but it's still tough to survive browsing the Internet without Flash installed. There is one program that makes me break my own rules, however, and that's Crashplan. more>>

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