The Latest

Adobe Levels the Playing Field with AIR 1.5 for Linux

Adobe releases AIR 1.5 for Linux today, December 18, 2008. This is great news for Linux users that have been stuck with 1.1 Beta. AIR applications that have been unable to install should install and run without problems. more>>

Novell Boxes Up Twenty Years of BrainShare

For the past twenty years, one of the jewels of the Novell calendar has been the annual BrainShare conference. Highlights have included, among many others, 2004's surprise appearance by Linux-creator Linus Torvalds — reportedly also attended by SCO arch-villan Darl McBride — and the 2008 revelation that Big Bird was switching to SUSE. It seems those memories are all that will remain of the conference, however, as Novell announced this morning that the conference has been canceled. more>>

Endless September 2.0

Back in January of 1994, Dave Fischer coined the idea of the "September that never ended." Basically, it referred to the influx of new Usenet users that came to college every September, and had to acclimate to how one conducts themselves on the 'net. more>>

Fedora Loses Infrastructure Services in Surprise Outage

An unplanned outage struck the Fedora Project early this morning, taking down elements of the project's infrastructure including the package buildsystem, a number of infrastructure-related databases, and the websites for several of the services maintained by the Fedora Infrastructure team, among others. more>>

Handling CSV Files in Python

As a buddy of mine always says "the nice thing about standards is that there's so many to choose from". Take CSV files for example. CSV, of course, stands for "Comma Separated Values", more often than not though, it seems that CSV files use tabs to separate values rather than commas. more>>

What Are They Using?

I was celebrating Leap Day (February 29) at a London pub with Mark Antony Kent, Head of Technology Strategy at British Telecom, hoping also to pump his brain for insights to follow up on a contentious FCC hearing at Harvard earlier that week—one convened to visit issues around Comcast's valving of BitTorrent traffic. more>>

OpenOffice.org: The many views of Impress

Presentation software isn't complicated compared to a word processor or spreadsheet. It doesn't need to be. Maybe that's why OpenOffice.org's Impress offers a variety of views of your work. more>>

Linux Foundation TABulates the Votes

The Linux Foundation — the not-for-profit organization that keeps Linus Torvalds behind the keyboard and provides services like the Linux Standards Base and Linux Legal Defense Fund — made the results of the Foundation's annual Technical Advisory Board election official on Tuesday, announcing the election of six new members from the Linux kernel developer community. more>>

GPL Violations: Is Cisco the Big One?

Many sceptics were convinced that as free software spread out beyond hackers into the general computing sector the rigorous GNU GPL licence would gradually be replaced by more accommodating – meaning weaker – forms, since it was “obvious” that its unbending rules were too strict for widespread use. In fact, the GPL has grown in importance, until today it is probably fair to say that it underpins most of the free software world, including enterprise applications. This makes any violation of its terms particularly worrying, because if left unchallenged, it threatens to undermine the entire ecosystem. more>>

What constitutes "non-commercial use"?

Creative Commons is surveying people on what they believe constitutes "non-commercial use". more>>

Slice and Dice Images with ImageMagick

You can use the convert command that comes with ImageMagick to extract parts of an image.

You can cut out a 100-pixel-wide chunk from somewhere in the middle of an image: more>>

RIAA Preys on Teen in Need of Transplant

The Recording Industry Association of America has done a number of distressing, disgusting, and disgraceful things in its never-ending quest to fill its coffers with ill-gotten gains from every American with an internet connection. The news out of Pittsburgh, however, carries what we have to class as the most depraved stunt we've seen them pull so far. more>>

Blocking Content in the UK. Censorship or Populace Protection?

A startling development is being reported by the BBC in the UK. It seems that the Internet Watch Foundation which looks like a quasi governmental organization, has taken offense with an album cover on Wikipedia and is “blocking” access to it. IWF claims it is an issue of child pornography, Wikipedia is calling it censorship. more>>

Know when your drives are failing, with smartd

“Ka-chunk... ka-chunk... ka-chunk... tick... tick... tick... Ka-chunk... ka-chunk...” That's just not a sound you ever want to hear coming from a hard drive. It's the sound of a hard drive trying to move it's read/write heads into a position that they don't seem to want to go to or its trying to read a sector that just isn't there anymore. more>>

Let's improve on the pay toilet model for public wi-fi

Public wi-fi in airports and hotels is offered on the pay toilet model. It charges money to use low-cost plumbing facilities. I believe it would be better for airports, and their passengers, if plumbing usage were free, just as it is for water and trains between terminals.

Can we tell them how? more>>

Python Sheds 2.x Skin

The much-anticipated next incarnation of the popular Python programming language — voted favorite scripting language in the 2008 Linux Journal Readers' Choice Awards — slithered onto the scene on Wednesday with the release of Python 3.0. Known popularly as Python 3000 or Py3k, Python 3.0 bears the distinction of being the first release in the language's history to deliberately break compatibility with previous versions. more>>

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Linux Journal Live - December 4, 2008

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The December 4, 2008 Linux Journal Live!. Shawn Powers and Kyle Rankin take your Linux Questions. more>>

Cycles and Simplicities

Om Malik calls this "dave winer's best post of the year". I can't recall a better one, but ranking isn't what matters here. What matters is perspective and experience, and Dave has plenty of both. What he says is, more>>

Fedora Fishing for a Fresh Appellation

The naming conventions for Linux distributions are a many-splendored thing: Ubuntu's names are perhaps most well-known, owing to their ear-pleasing alliteration and the sheer number necessitated by the frequency of releases. Debian, too, is well known for naming the versions inhabiting the multi-tiered release system after characters from the Toy Story franchise — even down-to-business Gentoo is in on the games, with the 2008.0 release bearing the codename "It's got what plants crave." Now it's Fedora's turn at bat, with entries open on the nom de plume for Fedora 11. more>>