Linux Journal Contents #132, April 2005

Linux Journal Issue #132/April 2005

Features

Indepth

  • Performers Go Web  by Patricia Jung
    That on-line animation was pretty funny, but how about performing a show live? Here's new software that makes it possible.
  • My Favorite bash Tips and Tricks  by Prentice Bisbal
    These command-line stunts will have you manipulating lots of files as easily as you would do one before. The sooner you start, the more time you'll save.
  • File Synchronization with Unison  by Erik Inge Bolso
    Is the latest version of that file on my server, my desktop or my laptop? With Unison, the answer is “yes”.
  • Using C for CGI Programming  by Clay Dowling
    Your Web app doesn't have to be written in some newfangled scripting malarkey. Check out the speed when you try it in C.
  • Part III: AFS—A Secure Distributed Filesystem  by Alf Wachsmann
    Reconfigure servers without changing mount points on the clients with this Kerberos-authenticated network filesystem.

Embedded

  • Linux on a Small Satellite  by Christopher Huffine
    If you need to get a satellite launched in a year, think standard parts, creative reuse and shell scripts.

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