I wake up in the middle of the night, mouth parched and vision blurry, and fumble around to find my iPhone. I press my thumb to the fingerprint scanner, and in the dim blue light, just out of...
Connect to the Internet, work with your files, lock your workspace, listen to music and do so much more with the help of Bluetooth technology.
I admit it, some tools confuse me. I know they must be amazing, because programs don't get popular by being dumb (well, reality TV, but that's another story). I have the same sort of confusion with...
Debian Project Aims to Keep the CIA Off Our Computers

Debian Project Aims to Keep the CIA Off Our Computers

Lunar, one of the lead developers on the Debian ReproducibleBuilds project, has recently outlined a serious security hole that could impact all open-source software, including most Linux distributions. It potentially exposes users to unwanted scrutiny from third parties, including security agencies. His project is designed to close this hole.


SUSE – “Will not diverge from its Open Source roots!”

No one had a busier LinuxCon show than the folks at SUSE. Yet still they were gracious enough, and care enough about the community, to sit down for a talk with Linux Journal. more>>

BitTorrentSync: Dropbox for Nerds

It's not really fair to compare Dropbox directly with BitTorrentSync. First of all, my title implies Dropbox is somehow inferior. To be honest, I haven't found anything that works as smoothly as Dropbox when it comes to sync reliability and ease of installation. That said, although it has incredible strengths, it also has a few shortcomings. more>>

GeekGuides Practical books for the most technical people on the planet

New GeekGuides: DIY Commerce Site and Combating Infrastructure Sprawl

GeekGuides are practical (and free!) books for the most technical people on the planet. Newly available books include:


Non-Linux FOSS: PlexConnect

It's no secret that I'm a huge fan of Plex. It might be a secret, however, that I live in a house with quite a few Apple products. That said, I find the Apple TV to be one of the most limiting, frustrating set-top boxes to work with. (I'm sure most readers would agree.) I prefer to be a lover, not a hater, so I searched long and hard to find a way to make the Apple TV suck less. more>>

diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development

Boot times can become slow on systems with many CPUs, partly because of the time it takes to crank up all the RAM chips. Mel Gorman recently submitted some patches to start up RAM chips in parallel instead of one after the other. more>>

Android Candy: Copay—the Next-Generation Bitcoin Wallet

When I hear the word "copay", I think of the doctor's office. Thankfully, the Copay app from the folks at Bitpay doesn't cost you anything, and it keeps your Bitcoin healthy and secure. I've mentioned many Bitcoin wallet applications and cloud solutions during the past few years, but Copay truly is different. It has features other wallets can't touch, such as: more>>

The True Internet of Things

Before the Internet there were just nets, and they didn't get along. Each was a country or a city-state of its own, with hard boundaries that could not be crossed—or could be crossed only if the owners of the networks created closed and silo'd ways of doing it. more>>

September 2015 Issue of Linux Journal: HOW-TOs

How to Do That Thing You Do

I love to learn. I've always been a learner, so grade school and college were both extremely enjoyable for me. more>>

Using tshark to Watch and Inspect Network Traffic

Most of you probably have heard of Wireshark, a very popular and capable network protocol analyzer. What you may not know is that there exists a console version of Wireshark called tshark. The two main advantages of tshark are that it can be used in scripts and on a remote computer through an SSH connection. more>>

Where's That Pesky Hidden Word?

I've been promising my 11-year-old for a long time now that I'd write a program that would let you build custom word searches based on a list of words given by the user. I wrote one years and years ago in C, but since I can't find that code any more and wanted to tackle another interesting project for this column, that's what I'm going to look at herein. more>>

A Project to Guarantee Better Security for Open-Source Projects

With many open-source projects built on top of others, a security weakness in a common piece of infrastructure can have far-reaching consequences. As OpenSSL's Heartbleed security hole demonstrated, these vulnerabilities can appear in even the most trusted packages. more>>

My Network Go-Bag

I often get teased for taking so much tech hardware with me on trips—right up until the Wi-Fi at the hotel, conference center or rented house fails. I'm currently on vacation with my family and some of our friends from Florida, and our rental home has a faulty Wi-Fi router. Thankfully, I have a bag full of goodies for just this occasion. more>>

Doing Astronomy with Python

One of the things that makes Python so powerful is that you can find a module for almost anything. In this article, I cover Astropy, which was originally developed by the Space Telescope Science Institute for doing astronomy calculations like image processing and observatory calculations. more>>

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