Server hardening. The very words conjure up images of tempering soft steel into an unbreakable blade, or taking soft clay and firing it in a kiln, producing a hardened vessel that will last many...
The Wine team members released version 1.8 of their project this week. The project has been in constant development since 1993 and reached version 1 only in 2008, so new releases are major events.
This article is the third part of a four-part series that examines some of the changes in 3D printing that have occurred in the past three years since my first articles on the subject. Because this...

Dear Kodi, Where's My Surround?!?!

I love Kodi. (This is just an evolution of my love for XBMC, since it's the same thing with a new name.) In fact, although I've expressed my love for Plex over and over (and over) the past few years, I still use Kodi as my main interface for the televisions in my house. more>>

Non-Linux FOSS: Open-Source Windows?

I have mixed emotions about ReactOS. It's open source. It's freely available. But, its goal is to be binary-compatible with Windows! ReactOS is not a Linux operating system. In fact, it doesn't share the UNIX architecture at all. It looks like Windows NT, and it behaves much like Windows NT.

It's just odd! more>>

diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development

There's an ongoing impulse among a diversity of developers to be able to compile some or all of the Linux kernel as a library, so that a piece of software could use kernel services and APIs while running under a different kernel entirely, or a different operating system. more>>

Help Me, Uncle Shawn

If you're anything like me, the holiday season is spent fixing Wi-Fi and removing spyware. Occasionally, I get to install Linux for a relative who is ready to give up Windows or needs something that will run on a circa-Windows 2000 computer (Xubuntu is usually my choice). more>>

What We Can Do with Ad Blocking's Leverage

"Never waste a crisis," Rahm Emanuel is said to have said. And publishers — including Linux Journal — have one now. more>>

January 2016 Issue of Linux Journal

2016: a Long Year

I know you're expecting a sarcastic comment about an election year in the US making it seem longer than normal, but no, 2016 is literally a longer year than most. more>>

MySQL—Some Handy Know-How

I recently was talking to someone over IRC who was helping me with a PHP app that was giving me trouble. The extremely helpful individual asked me to let him know the value of a certain field in a record on my MySQL server. I embarrassingly admitted that I'd have to install something like PHPMyAdmin or Adminer in order to find that information. more>>

Working with Functions: Towers of Hanoi

For this article, I thought it would be beneficial to go back to some basics of shell scripting and look at how functions work. Most script writers probably eschew using functions because it's a bit antithetical to how scripts tend to evolve, as a sequence of commands on the command line that are captured in a file. more>>

What's New in 3D Printing, Part I: Introduction

Three years ago, I wrote a series of articles titled "Getting Started with 3D Printing" that discussed the current state of the hobbyist 3D printing market from both the hardware and software angles. This is an incredibly fast-moving industry, and a lot has changed since I wrote those columns. more>>

Build a Large-Screen Command Center with the RPi 2

When the folks who make the Raspberry Pi made good on their plan to release a multi-core version of the tiny computer with 1GB of RAM earlier this year, I saw it as the perfect opportunity to put the single-board Linux box to work—real work—in our company's network operations center. more>>

Node.js Version Chaos Management

I'm just starting out in the world of development, and many of the projects I'm interested in exploring are written in Node.js. If you're an old hand at such things, you already know that which version of Node you use on a particular application is vitally important. more>>

Symbolic Algebra Everywhere

Previously in this space, I have covered software packages like Maxima that can be used to solve symbolic mathematics problems. Several packages are available that can do those types of calculations. In this article, I discuss Xcas/Giac. Xcas is the GUI interface to the system. more>>

Chromebookify Your Laptop Now!

A few years ago there was a project designed to boot generic laptops so they functioned as Chromebooks. It was a cool project, but unfortunately, the compatibility wasn't great, and it wasn't reliable to use on a daily basis. Although Chromebooks are old news these days, it still would be quite useful to transform aging laptop computers into Chromebooks. more>>

Swift Is Now Open Source

In June this year, Apple raised more than a few eyebrows at its WWDC conference with an announcement about Swift. Just a year before, Apple had released Swift, a new programming language. It was a big deal--a much simpler language for faster development. more>>

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