The internet didn't come with privacy, any more than the planet did. But at least the planet had nature, which provided raw materials for the privacy technologies we call clothing and shelter. On the net, we use human nature to make our own raw materials. Those include code, protocols, standards, frameworks and best practices, such as those behind free and open-source software.

Synacor, Inc.'s Zimbra Open Source Support and Zimbra Suite Plus

Zimbra Collaboration Suite is a successful open-source collaboration application that includes email, calendaring, file sharing, chat and video chat. Zimbra's developer, Synacor, Inc., recently released two new Zimbra-related offerings, namely Zimbra Open Source Support (ZOSS) and Zimbra Suite Plus. more>>

Tyson Foods Honored as SUSE Customer of the Year

Every year, SUSE honors 4 companies worldwide, one in each region of the globe: Latin America, APAC, EMEA and North America. Recipient companies are recognized for “defining the future:” using SUSE open source solutions for IT transformation, increased business agility and continuity. 2016 award recipients are : Ach á Laboratorios Farmaceuticos S.A. more>>

Example Security Exercises

The following is a list of security exercises you can try after reading Susan Sons' article "Security Exercises".

1) It's Gone more>>

Security Exercises

Regular security exercises are, bar none, the most powerful, cost-effective tool for maturing a project's information security operations—when done well. more>>

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SUSE: A look inside the new SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2

A report from SUSECon:

While out in the streets of DC there was alternately depression and elation, gnashing of teeth and celebration, at SUSECon yesterday, SUSE announced SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 12 Service Pack 2 designed to power physical, virtual and cloud-based mission-critical environments. more>>

Spinning and Text Processing

I have a dirty secret to share, and I hope you won't think less of me once you learn it. more>>

SUSE: Unleash the Tiger!

This is our first dispatch from the front lines: Washington DC. And I am not speaking of the election front lines, but of the Linux front. Linux Journal has come to SUSECon this year to, among other things, gauge the state of the world concerning all things open source. To plagiarize every president at the start of every state of the union address, the state of Linux is strong! more>>

nginx and WordPress

In my last article, I took an initial look at nginx, the high-performance open-source HTTP that uses a single process and a single thread to service a large number of requests. nginx was designed for speed and scalability, as opposed to Apache, which was designed to maximize flexibility and configuration. more>>

Paragon Software Group's ExtFS for Windows

Fellow Linux/Windows dual-booters out there are familiar with this problem: you can access Windows files from your Linux session, but not the other way around. more>>

Elizabeth K. Joseph and Matt Fischer's Common OpenStack Deployments

Public and private clouds typically are built and integrated using OpenStack technology. Professionals seeking guidance on this important topic should investigate Elizabeth K. more>>

Pancaking the Pyramid Economy

In 1937, Ronald Coase gave economics something new: a theory for why companies should exist. Oddly, this hadn't come up before. more>>

Linaro Ltd.'s OpenDataPlane

The OpenDataPlane (ODP) project is a founding initiative by the Linaro Networking Group to produce an open-source, cross-platform application programming interface (API) for the networking Software Defined Data Plane. Linaro Ltd. more>>

Linux Journal November 2016

Life Hacking

I like the idea of life hacking. more>>

Let's Automate Let's Encrypt

HTTPS is a small island of security in this insecure world, and in this day and age, there is absolutely no reason not to have it on every Web site you host. Up until last year, there was just a single last excuse: purchasing certificates was kind of pricey. more>>

Penclic B3 Mouse

"Does the world need a new computer mouse?" asks Penclic. "Yes it does!" says the Swedish peripherals developer. Most devices in our lives have undergone extensive changes through the years, notes Penclic, save the unlucky, unglamorous computer mouse. more>>

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