What's your favorite e-mail client?

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Another for Claws

Anonymous's picture

Small, fast, efficient.

Nice combo with the Midori Web browser; also small, fast, and efficient.

Using them with Fluppy 013 (a Puppy Linux version); also small, fast, efficient ...

Sensing a pattern? ;-)

Google :P

Anonymous's picture

Google :P

Google :P

Anonymous's picture

Google :P

Probably Gmail is the best.

Anonymous's picture

Probably Gmail is the best. It's light, it's fast.
nail fungus treatments

Yahoo web mail

Anonymous's picture

I vote for Yahoo web mail

Claws

Anonymous's picture

Claws

SeaMonkey

anonymous's picture

SeaMonkey

claws!

Deadguy's picture

claws mail..

Other:

Anonymous's picture

Claws-mail

email client

Anonymous's picture

web based gmail

Several mailers

MP's picture

Lotus Notes (+ iNotes) + GMail + Thunderbird (rarely)

Windows Live Mail works for

Anonymous's picture

Windows Live Mail works for me. It reads RSS and Usenet too.

Other: Claws-mail.

Diego Guraieb's picture

Other: Claws-mail.

Claws Mail

Anonymous's picture

Claws Mail

Claws-mail

Anonymous's picture

Claws-mail

EMACS

RedSounding's picture

Emacs is fast and reliable. Love it. Sometimes proven tech is the best tech... sometimes not though... but the ability to program and read e-mail without shifting apps to me is wonderful!

definetly postler

ubuntufreak's picture

definetly postler

gnus

ymerejt's picture

I'm using GNUS.

Favorite e-mail client

Anonymous's picture

I use Opera with IMAP to read my 8 e-mail accounts at once (approx 20K mails).
With this amount of mail, I do not want to organize my mail i folders etc., and I think Opera is doing a good job helping me out here.
SPAM-filter is, in my opinion, very good.
I also love Operas sync of speeddial, bookmarks etc. between devices, but I miss sync of contacts and email accounts (settings, IMAP doesn't need sync of mail).

Horde addict

Janis's picture

may be I am using WMD on sparrows, but I like horde and slowly move to Horde4

SeaMonkey

Nomax's picture

Other: SeaMonkey.

Zimbra desktop

Anonymous's picture

I throw my $.02 put there. Zimbra Desktop is a solid client, particularly with the 7.x release.

e-mail fav "yahoo mail" beta

Anonymous's picture

I also use g-mail too, and Mac OS X default e-mail client but it is really lousy.

I like the fact that

Ritesh Raj Sarraf's picture

I like the fact that ThunderBird is standing out as the best Email client because it really deserves to be the best.

claws

Anonymous's picture

claws

Yeah, claws!

Anonymous's picture

Yeah, claws!

Claws & EXMH

Anonymous's picture

Second Claws, exmh is my other one. Both understand mh directories (one e-mail per file, in directories nesting possible).

second that. eudora based on

Anonymous's picture

second that. eudora based on t-bird gets a 2nd place.

Preferred EMail Program

Anonymous's picture

I use Eudora 7 in Windows and Eudora 6.2 in Linux. Both are GUI.

Foxmail

peng,yao's picture

Foxmail by Tencent,It's a good email client!

Telnet!

TheWall's picture

"Telnet 110" to read mail and "telnet 25" to send >:]

Okay, I typically use Thunderbird on my Linux machines, Apple's Mail program on my Mac and GMail on my Android. However, when I'm ssh'd into a remote machine or when I need to see what's really going on behind the scenes with the mail server, telnet gets the job done.

gmail - mutt - thunderbird

ragwing's picture

I used mutt for a long time and Gmail when it started. Now I use thunderbird and gmail. But since I am retired don't do much sysadmin anymore.

I voted for Pine....

tallship's picture

I actually have two favs, which I use for different purposes.

Thunderbird handles most of my communications with the outside world, while I depend upon Pine for some specific outside communications as well as almost all of my cron, sysadmin, and monitoring mailings.

I hope that helps :)

Registered Linux User #190795

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Registered Linux User #190795

Wanderlust (Emacs)!

Herbert J. Skuhra's picture

Wanderlust (Emacs)!

+1 Wanderlust (Emacs)!

Bill Day's picture

Wanderlust is not for the faint of heart. It is temperamental, difficult to configure, and sparsely documented. However, for those willing to invest a little time and effort, it pays off in speed, flexibility, configurability, and integration with emacs (a particular plus for those of us addicted to org-mode). It is my default for my laptop.

None of the above

AnilG's picture

I hope I get a chance to look at Claws or Zimbra since they sound interesting but when will someone implement proper tagging? I was SO looking forward to something radical when Thunderbird came out. Why are we still using folders? There should be no such thing as a folder and all mail should be taggable ad naseum: automatic tagging based on everything in the mail headers and content, intelligent learned tagging, manual tagging, etc and attachments should be factored out and de-duped and then be deleteable, separately from the emails they came in.

Another Seamonkey vote

John in Kansas USA's picture

I switched 16 years ago from whatever Microsoft offered to Netscape 3-something, at some point switched from Netscape to Mozilla using the same data on both Windows and Linux, then on to Seamonkey on Linux exclusively. I like the all-in-one concept including an IRC client though I run the standalone Sunbird calendar. Switching would involve a lot of hassle for no good reason. The code base for Seamonkey and Thunderbird is supposed to be the same, and get the same bugfixes. It's just less well-known.

Gmail

w4rr10r's picture

I couldn't get used to Opera, Thunderbird, Trojitá, KMail and some others... hence I'm stuck with Gmail (and Google Reader, because I couldn't find any easy-to-sync desktop news-reader app). Yeah, I can't PGP... what can I do but suffer?

KMail, just before wanderlust

Arne Babenhauserheide's picture

I normally use KMail, but Emacs Wanderlust with connection to my kmail maildirs is a very nice backup to have (I use kmail directly from SVN: gentoo live ebuild) → http://draketo.de/light/english/free-software/emacs-wanderlust-kmail-mai...

Wanderlust works just like kmail, but it is in emacs and once the mails are loaded, it’s blazingly fast.

I've used claws-mail for a

yoander's picture

I've used claws-mail for a long time. It is fast, secure and stable with a lot of plugins that enhanced its funcionalities

another +1 for claws-mail

ektich's picture

flexibility of Mutt with a GUI

+1 for claws-mail. Once you

Anonymous's picture

+1 for claws-mail. Once you get past the somewhat complicated configuration, it's fast and gets the job done.

maildir vs mbox

Anonymous's picture

Any maildir client rather than mbox.
Yes mbox is faster to do seaches, but slight corruption and you lose the lot. maildir every message is a seperate file so slight corruption and you lose one message not all.

Someone please tell me of something other than Kmail that can do this and I will move today.

Sylpheed is a graphical

Anonymous's picture

Sylpheed is a graphical client that uses the MH format, which is also based on one file per message (under subdirs in ~/Mail/). It's very fast, simple, but with all the functionality I need. I've been using it for years.

thunderbird & k9 mail

LinuxReaders's picture

Thunderbird is best for Linux / Windows.
For Android I prefer K9 Mail.

Thunderbird

Steve Thompson's picture

I use Thunderbird, been using it since I was on XP (long time ago! no more! Ubuntu now) I access my Gmail account through Thunderbird, Gmail scans for Spam, then the mail gets scanned again by Thunderbird, almost never get anything dodgy coming through.

Claws and Gnus

Bart W's picture

Claws and Gnus

Windows Live Mail web client

1337pwn3r's picture

Windows Live Mail web client > OSS cr4p.

Outlook = shit

rautamiekka's picture

Everyone knows it. Micro$oft knows it. Full of holes. Dripping with pure shit. Only a dick like M$ uses it. Anything else but it. Period.

Myself using Thunderbird but TTBT I could use better one.

Claws Mail

Anonymous Coward's picture

I use Claws as it is lightweight, reliable and based in GTK. It fits well in my LXDE.

Claws is fast and responsive, and extensible by plugins. Many mail clients out there are a bit bloated, include lots of features I will never use and are too big and slow. With Claws, you have a mail client that just manages your mail, and only does more if you install the extensions you need.

Why use an app for every task, when you can do all the tasks with a single big all-mighty program? Because "Single Big All-Mighty Programs" use to be damn slow and slightly more unstable than the apps that just do one thing.

Claws is the lightest mail client you are going to get without turning to ncurses or other text-mode based interfaces. If you only need mail managing, with no calendar, GPG integration, etc, give it a try.

And, if you need calendars or GPG integration, you can install its plugins as well!

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