What is your favorite Linux distribution for use on the desktop?

Ubuntu
36% (5114 votes)
Mint
11% (1617 votes)
openSUSE
9% (1247 votes)
Debian
10% (1440 votes)
Puppy
1% (88 votes)
CentOS
2% (263 votes)
Fedora
12% (1753 votes)
Arch
8% (1089 votes)
PCLinuxOS
4% (508 votes)
other (please tell us which one in the comments below)
8% (1095 votes)
Total votes: 14214

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Slackware

Slackware's picture

Slackware

Crunchbang!!

Tim's picture

Gotta go with Crunchbang--the minimalist beauty (and performance!) of Openbox, the stability of Debian, and dead-simple installation (with no need to set up config files).

FEDORA

oirad's picture

Switched from ubuntu to fedora, I love it!

I did it too, couple of years

ufa's picture

I did it too, couple of years ago! Fedora rocks

Arch has a good mix

nolochemical's picture

What I'm finding is that most *nix users generally stop distro shopping with Arch. Arch user documentation is thorough; while still leaving room for curiosity and minimalism.

Hoping to see more derivatives *Hurd in the list sometime soon. Ie.. ArchHurd, Debian Gnu/Hurd

Who uses CentOs as a desktop.. really..?! Arch rocks.

Arch Linux FTW, I confirm it cures distro hopping.

cga's picture

Hi,

I began with Gentoo back in 2003, I was coming from a short while on Windows XP (3 nightmare months which I have to thank because it made me try this thing called Linux) and some experience on Mac OS 9 (many years before) but that laptop got stolen and I found myself without IT for long. Before Mac OS I used to use someone else's Windows 95. Before that I was a child literally living in Arcades who had a SEGA SC-3000 but hated BASIC and stupid and slow home computers. (I regret it now...)

Coming from nowhere to Gentoo was both a frikking hard steep step and an even more steep learning curve. My main activities until then were: download and chat, some music, video games. First thing (forced to) learned? Install of course. Compiling kernel comes with it. 3 days and 3 nights. But I did it. Gentoo was crazy, it still is. But it made me realize what a wonderful thing (Linux) I got into.

But the very first LOVE was Knoppix live CD (livecd: something amazing just to think and realize that seemed impossible back then...). Those colored lines scrolling on the screen while booting and Tux made forget about evening courses, I was in LOVE. Linux had to be my new toy, nothing else was a matter anymore.

After that I started distro hopping: SuSE, Mepis, YOPER, Fedora, Debian back to Gentoo for a short while then Source Mage. I can't recall them all, but I've tried at least 5 more.

Of course DE and WM of all sort. GNOME, KDE, XFCE, E16 and E17 (being active in E17 documentation too), Fluxbox, FWVM, OpenBox, only CLI experience too. God knows how many more.

Until the day I tried Arch Linux. The first time I was not ready for it, so after a while with [K]Ubuntu[Studio] I tried Chakra Linux since I wanted to check it out and to (basically) install Arch Linux with no effort. Then one day Chakra devs made a decision to get apart from Arch and use bundles. While I appreciate KDE and Qt and the brave decision Chakra took, I couldn't live without some GTK only software I use to make music. And I made my decision to switch to Arch, for good.

Arch it's simply P-E-R-F-E-C-T for Desktop. I't sleek, it's KISS, it's Yours and how You want it. Creating packages for AUR it's a breeze (I tried both .deb and .rpm and it's HELL). It's blazing fast and it works (tm).

I don't have to go further, just check it out and learn on the wiki. You'll find home.

ps: Arch for desktop; Debian for servers (maybe until I learn FreeBSD too).

... and what do you do, when

Anonymous's picture

... and what do you do, when you update your Arch, and you half-install package dependencies for new version of, say GIMP, and discover python PKGBUILD is unfinished and breaks straight, leaving your system half-updated mess.
And the developers are literally editing the PKGBUILD on AUR straight, making breakages galore.
My way was different: Ubuntu Studio-> Debian(great binary os) -> Arch -> Gentoo/Calculate.

I dont even think to return to Arch Mess - I already had enough fixing things - like newer gdm login manager, that denied login access .. for every UID in the system, because it was pushed on heads of ppl INCOMPLETE and untested.

Fresh, yeah, more RAW than fresh.

Because, sometimes, writing ONE command to call complex array of actions is ways EASIER than manually writing miriad of simple simple simple ... simple actions in a row. And when you have those config easily written in text, and have automation at different levels which only you decide which level to use, and have real choice between versions.

Mind ya, gentoo portage came from bsd ports.

Slackware!

Vyse of Arcadia's picture

Keepin' it simple with Slackware.

K.I.S.S. Arch Linux is the

Anonymous's picture

K.I.S.S. Arch Linux is the best!

ARCH LEENUCKS FOR PISS

Anonymous's picture

ARCH LEENUCKS FOR PISS

LDME

Snaga's picture

I voted for Ubuntu, because thats what I'm using right now, but Linux Mint Debian Edition is growing on me fast. I'm running it in a VM as often as I can to see how it fits. I have always preferred Gome/GTK, but neither Gnome 3 nor Unity seem right for me. I may have to make the break for KDE.

Ubuntu next one Mint

Hélio Félix's picture

For now I use Ubuntu, in the next installation I will try Mint.

I need usability and easy way to install app's. I need a community where I can look
for same problems than me.

Do you advice me another distribution?

you may want to try: 1)

stephen's picture

you may want to try:

1) Mageia
2) Sabayon Linux

wtf sabayon?

Anonymous's picture

Why would you want to try Sabayon?!
I don't get the point. Its ugliest distro ever, due to mutilated portage and very primitive(compared to apt) binary packager.
If people want Gentoo - they install Gentoo.
If they want Gentoo with collective driving effort direction Desktop - they go Calculate Linux. Because you can transform Gentoo into Calculate and vice versa via standard Gentoo profiles. Can you do same with Sabayon? Tried it multiple times and every time it was:
- resource hungry
- unoverseeable
- customization-castrated
- incompatible with gentoo
- uncapable of using portage completely
- uncapable of binary pckg mgmnt at apt level
- very slow on updates

Please tell me where Im wrong. No, it is NOT trolling - I just want to understand you people. Maybe Im missing something.

*ubuntu

Zolin.lnx's picture

I have been using the *ubuntu family for a while switching constantly between with ubuntu, kubuntu and lubuntu.

Aptosid

David Underwood's picture

Aptosid is a rolling release distro based on Debian sid, stabilsed by the folks from the Aptosid team.

The latest kernel is made available, due to the dedictiion of one of the team members.

An outstanding distro, with excellent documentation.

Slackware

Julio Torres's picture

I prefer slackware xD or Salixos.

Gentoo

Paulo Urio's picture

I was using ArchLinux until early 2011. Now I'm happy with Gentoo, but I like Arch as well.

Same here. Gentoo is best

Anonymous's picture

Same here.

Gentoo is best distro ever.

Calculate Linux is very fine approach to it(works as profile), but now I run standard gentoo x64 2010 profile.

Anyone using Ubuntu should ... seek medical attention. Because, because of its instability there is Mint. And because of its gruesome "unity"(lookup "unity" in fallout 1, quite matching) there are numerous respins that are plainly ignored.

Ubuntu is microsoft in linux world.
Bloated, unstable, paid to hold first lines in ads, barely modifiable, extremely popular yet almost zero impact on actual linux ecosystem development.

But, heck, use what you want. Just not windows.

And you forgot Magea/Mandriva in your poll. On purpose?

.

Archer_909's picture

Arch is the best !

Crunchbang

Bishop Joey's picture

I'm happily using Crunchbang version 10 (http://crunchbanglinux.org/), I play around a fair bit with other small footprint distros including Bodhi, which I predict will be very popular.

All *buntu or just Ubuntu?

Anonymous's picture

Should clarify if Ubuntu includes all of the other *buntus as well. Voted for Ubuntu but use Kubuntu.

Missing Option

JohnG's picture

Without trying to split hairs, Kubuntu is enough of a separate distribution to have it's own category, IMHO. The uproar over Unity and the religious wars over the Gnome desktop have really marred the underlying distro, and using the Kubuntu version of things really puts one above the fray. KDE 4.6+ has really proven that the KDE3->KDE4 transition was worth the pain. I hope the Gnome desktop folks get to that point eventually with Unity and whatever else they have in the pipeline, but until they're back on stable ground, Kubuntu as a base install distro deserves a vote of its own.

Kubuntu is not separate

Anonymous's picture

Kubuntu is not separate distribution. It's the same distribution of software as any other *buntu. It's just different install CD.

I disagree on this. You can't

Ema's picture

I disagree on this.
You can't turn a Fedora into a Debian, but you can turn a Ubuntu into a Kubuntu just by installing a different selection of packages. I think this is the criteria for distinguish distros (in this context).
This is why I voted for Debian while actually using Crunchbang.

Agreed. And my ubuntu vote

xiao_haozi's picture

Agreed.

And my ubuntu vote was for kubuntu as well.

Where is the Kubuntu option?

markc's picture

Yes, such a pity that the Ubuntu option is artificially inflated by Kubuntu users having no option but to select Ubuntu. It's like M$ claiming that all the massive sales figures for retail computers prove how much love there is for their OS when we all here know a small but significant proportion of those sales figures have some kind of linux installed on them as soon as the devices are unboxed. Ubuntu !== Kubuntu. The end user experience is entirely different.

SimplyMEPIS

Anonymous's picture

Is simply great. Stable, powerful, friendly community.

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