What is your favorite Linux distribution for use on the desktop?

Ubuntu
36% (5114 votes)
Mint
11% (1617 votes)
openSUSE
9% (1247 votes)
Debian
10% (1440 votes)
Puppy
1% (88 votes)
CentOS
2% (263 votes)
Fedora
12% (1753 votes)
Arch
8% (1089 votes)
PCLinuxOS
4% (508 votes)
other (please tell us which one in the comments below)
8% (1095 votes)
Total votes: 14214

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pardus

toofun's picture

pardus, the one most stable and easy i can find. no need to search drivers but lack of some software

Pardus is my favorite too.

Kirikli's picture

Pardus is my favorite too. Pardus 2011 is great and i am using it. for software use pisi, for windows programs use wine.

Absolutely Pardus is best

Anonymous's picture

Absolutely Pardus is best distro ever.

slitaz or slackware

Anonymous's picture

Slitaz for desktop machines because its lightning fast and simple to use, but definitely slackware for server machines. that kind of rock solid reliability is hard to come by.

What is your favorite Linux distribution for use on the desktop?

Welington Dias's picture

Slackware.
Why it's not in main list along with the others, by the way ?

welingtond

Kubuntu

Anonymouses's picture

I use Kubuntu. This survey implies that I am using "Ubuntu" but... the authors are not the same, the used programs are not the same, and if you go to the Ubuntu documentation, they say "click there", "look there in..." and assume you have Ubuntu installed, so that documentation is misleading for Kubuntu users. It's not the same.

non-click-to-install

Source Guy's picture

I'm going to have to say I prefer Gentoo on my desktops. Roughly 10 years ago, RedHat worked for me, and then they started removing codecs so I had to start rolling my own media players or using 3rd party repositories. Since then I've used many distributions and different desktop environments. Anymore, when it comes down to it, the desktop environment itself matters little to me: just give me a browser and a decent terminal emulator and I'm happy. But, no matter which desktop environment I'm in, I'm not going to accept it if is a poorly built version; see, I'm not picky about what I'm given, just very picky about quality of the item itself.

Mostly I use kde when I have a choice, which is why I dislike using most distributions: their kde builds are atrocious. Even *if* they give me an option to install a lightweight kde version, it runs terrible, and this goes even for kde-centric distros, for example kubuntu. There's no reason their kde runs un-useably slow even with the "lighter-weight" openbox backend when I can build kde from source and have it use its native kwin just fine on the same hardware. Other distros do a bad job packaging kde as well, OpenSuse and Fedora to name two more. In the name of refinishing it and making it look gnome-2.x-ish, it ends up being a terrible version of kde for anyone who actually likes kde.

The other big problem I find with many distros is upgrades. I've found it easier to go through compiling my own updates than depending on auto-magic to guide me through "click to update" buttons that at some point will break your system. Most recently, Ubuntu did that to me at a job site and frankly it was embarrassing to have Linux break in less than five minutes using a "made for desktop users" version.

Gentoo gets it share of bad press and jabs made it it, but one thing Gentoo does well is survive updates and remain pretty close to upstream visions of how software should be "packaged." That is, if I download vlc or kde or mplayer, I get what the upstream developers envision, not a binary that's been run through an alternative-reality filter.

Gentoo

Anonymous's picture

Gentoo has a high bar of admittance, but it is great once you get it going. You can easily keep it up to date with the latest packages and kernels. No need to ever re-install to update it. You also get to learn a lot about linux in the process.

Xubuntu

Anonymous's picture

I prefer xfce over gnome so I use Xubuntu. I also prefer apt instead of yum so it makes things easy for me. The look/feel is great, it's fast and it has a lot of the programs I need from the start...not too many wasted resources. Besides, that new crap they added to gnome...what do the call it the shell or something? It's crap...a waste of space, a hindrance, waste of time...I took Ubuntu off my computer within 15min of putting it on...geeze...really...what were they thinking...???

Slackware

RASC's picture

Slackware and nothing more :P

I use Slackware, since 1998,

slack-track's picture

I use Slackware, since 1998, because its stable.

Slackware

Xman's picture

Only Slackware :) I love it from kernel 1.2.13
It is like old wine, keeps getting better as the days go by.

Backtrack. :)

Anonymous's picture

Backtrack. :)

I think that Slackware is the

Israel's picture

I think that Slackware is the best distribution, it makes you understood more how Linux works. by not only click next on an GUI.

Slackware

AC's picture

Been using Slackware since 1997 because it just works!

Fedora

Anonymous's picture

I am using Fedora 15 with KDE/XFCE and I just love it. Fedora is definitely my choice.

Million Dollar Pips Review

Anonymous's picture

It's based on debian stable so it's rock solid stable.So look it million dollar pips review

Pardus

Duran Serkan's picture

Pardus is the most innovative and promising distro in the our galaxy

Slackware.

Anonymous's picture

Its Linux! In a terminal-shaped can with lots of pre-packaged software, flexibility, and stability. You will of course burn through a few installs before you get it right.

Slackware

Howard's picture

I've been a Slackware user and supporter for many years now. I still prefer the speed and simplicity of Slackware, over the other distributions I've used (Red Hat, SuSE, Mandrake, Debian, Ubuntu, and others too numerous to count).

I'm going to non-conform with

Anonymous's picture

I'm going to non-conform with the nonconformists. Ubuntu. When I first got into Linux, I was turned off to Ubuntu, because it was the most popular, supposedly the "easiest" and the best for newbies. But eventually I gave it a try. After a while it grew on me. Then, after trying a variety of alternatives, I kept coming back to Ubuntu. Now I might try something different just for the novelty, but I just don't don't see any point in really using anything else.

Linux Mint and OpenSUSE deserve very honorable mention. But Linux Mint is basically Ubuntu with different default aps and theme. Everything good about Mint you can easily get in Ubuntu. LMDE shares the weaknesses of Debian--annoyances and headaches--especially important for me is getting it to use my keyboard layout of choice, Dvorak, as system default. Sure, I could find a solution, but I got tired after of banging my head against the wall after a few hours, and why bother when most other distros have that problem solved the second I pop in the live/install disk? Fedora--again with the headache factor, but moreso than most distros I've tried. I've tried it at least five times, and ever time I've abandoned the attempt shortly after starting it.

I was drawn to Linux because of a growing interest in programming--because I realized that I enjoy problem solving and troubleshooting. But my time is better spend tackling interesting problems on a fully-functioning computer. Just because I can doesn't mean I actually want to spend hours upon hours getting my computer to be able to do the sorts of things that MS Windows (like it or not) has made us come to expect a computer to be able to do by default without any specialized knowledge on our part shortly after pressing the "on" button.

Perfumes Valencia

Perfumes Valencia's picture

The best distribution for me is Debian

Slackware FTW! :D

Tuxedo's picture

Slackware FTW! :D

Linux Rulz!!

Anonymous's picture

Knoppix
Yoper
Red Hat
Debian
Slackware
Mandrake
Mepis
Yellow Dog
Suse
Gentoo
College
CentOS

I've tried them all...and Ubuntu blows them out of the water! I have been messing with linux since 2002 or so. Drivers were always a huge problem...especially wireless drivers. It would takes days of reading, testing, and experimenting to get a very crippled system running (compared to Windows.) It was only when Ubuntu came out that I found a distribution that worked out of the box with almost all of the tools an average PC user would want! And their forums were top notch. Since then I have learned a great deal about Linux and computers in general, but I still use Ubuntu as my main workstation OS. I use other distros and OSs for other purposes. If you're a Linux newbie, or just want something that you know will work, you can't go wrong with ubuntu.

and I tried ubuntu too and it

Kirikli's picture

and I tried ubuntu too and it wan nothing comparable to Pardus, believe me. I removed Ubuntu and now using Pardus.

My favorite Linux distribution for use on the desktop

Anonymous's picture

Slackware.

Alpine Linux!

Anonymous's picture

Alpine Linux!

Slackware

Janis's picture

the only explanation is - I am very used to it. Despite the need to DIY in case of multimedia or some specific app.

Slackware

jwblack's picture

I have a funny story, long ago I bought a book called Wicked Cool Shell Scripts and was going through it. I came across a script that simply did not work, oh I tried. I emailed the author and after about three weeks of going around and around he asked me what OS I was running. I told him Slackware. He had never heard of Slackware and came to the conclusion that was the reason his script didn't work.

Now when I get my glossy Linux Journal I simply skip that chapter.

Sorry Dave.

Slackware

Mats Tegner's picture

I run Slackware64-current with the latest 2.6 kernel. I like the simplicity of text-based config-files and the ability to compile software from source without trouble.

Gentoo

Anonymous's picture

I use Gentoo for many years now.
I find it easy to maintain.

Mepis

Anonymous's picture

+1 for Mepis

Favourite Linux Desktop Distro

Stephen's picture

Don't really have a favourite but honurable mention should go to CrunchBang for a minimal desktop that power users should be comfortable with. Looks pretty too.

ditto I've used linux for at

Anonymous's picture

ditto
I've used linux for at least 10 yrs and have been an avid distro hopper. I believe all the distro's have been a positive aspect of the freedom that linux gives to the user.

And as the votes indicate certainly a few distro's are alway going to be at the forefront but there are many, many more that are instrumental both in their success and linux's overall success.

As a recent adoptee of Crunchbang it is refreshing, good implementation, flexible, nice on older equipment. And I hate to admit it; I just never could get Arch/ArchBang to go on my older laptop.

Slackware

Sam Albuquerque's picture

I'm surprised you did not include Slackware, the oldest Linux distro in your list.

SLK

lira's picture

SLK

Mandriva

Egon's picture

Mandriva is my favorite distro. It's easy to install and very easy to configure. I have it installed on both my PC and on a bootable USB stick.

Mint 10

Anonymous's picture

Refreshingly simple to install, use and maintain without too many problems. It just works for everyday mail, chat, web, networking, DVB-TV, media, programming, compiling, linking, office...etc... But.... Mint 11 is not initially better! and the Ubuntu base is now unsure! The Debian way looks good, but can't get along with the present Gnome 3 or Unity, which only work with added (used) graphics cards which pump out heat.

Chrome OS is great stuff

Anonymous's picture

Just released, but it's pretty cool to make your ChromeBook.

PARDUS

Anonymous's picture

PARDUS

Ubuntu (and Linux) Rocks

Anees Haider's picture

Just to tell you guys my recent experience of awesomeness with Ubuntu (and Linux)...

On my notebook, My primary partition crashed, DVD Writer+ROM not working.
Just release the hard drive from notebook, attached it with the usb cable to my desktop system. Using VBox, attached the hard drive as virtual drive. Install Ubuntu on this virtual drive, reattached it to notebook and voila, I have my notebook up and running...

Ubuntu rocks...

tried it with XP, always get blue screen... :(

Ubuntu (and Linux) Rocks

Anonymous's picture

Just to tell you guys my recent experience of awesomeness with Ubuntu (and Linux)...

On my notebook, My primary partition crashed, DVD Writer+ROM not working.
Just release the hard drive from notebook, attached it with the usb cable to my desktop system. Using VBox, attached the hard drive as virtual drive. Install Ubuntu on this virtual drive, reattached it to notebook and voila, I have my notebook up and running...

Ubuntu rocks...

tried it with XP, always get blue screen... :(

openSUSE including Suse Linux Enterprise

paulparker's picture

Am one of the "technically challenged".

Whilst can follow easy to read instructions, am no longer surprised how difficult many with skills have writing them {:-O

openSUSE am still happy to recommend, even help install, for others prepared try.

Selected openSUSE above as the Suse Linux Enterprise 11 sp1 x86_64, am using comes from openSUSE, made switch due support Attachmate-Novell provides.

.

Best OS

Anonymous's picture

My preference is PinguyOS. It has an even better desktop than the new Ubuntu, plus it's easy to use.

USU Linux - it's a Bulgarian

Anonymous's picture

USU Linux - it's a Bulgarian distro
http://learnfree.eu

Slackware

laitcg's picture

IMHO, the fastest, most stable and secure distro there is.

I installed Arch on my

Toni's picture

I installed Arch on my netbook last october, with fluxbox and my choice of apps. Just for testing purposes, mind you..
..I find myself still running it, don't see no reason why I shoud reinstall :)

Kubuntu

digie's picture

Kubuntu

There can only be one PCLinuxOS

EvilRoot's picture

We all know that Ubuntu will "win" this through numbers, but then numbers are not the the best way to select the best, numbers wise there are more users of windows than linux, although Linux is clearly the better choice.

PCLinuxOS is "just right" its development team LISTEN to its community , community members help steer its direction, and its look and feel, and although not a 'democracy' it offers more choice, scalability and better 'quality of service ' than the larger better funded distributions ever can.

I would suggest that if you are not using PCLinuxOS you should (theer is a new trsting iso oiut for 2011) then comback here and revote

PCLinuxOS the choice for independent thinkers

EvilRoot

Amen...

H4Gr33D's picture

Nothing to be added. He said it just the way it is.

H4Gr33D

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