What Color is Your Car?

Green Snot

Geeks like their soda Mountain Dewey, their coffee strong, and their source open. But what I'm REALLY curious about is what color car we drive. You know, for science. :)

Please select the color of your car. If you have two different color cars, or a car that is multi-colored -- pick a color you feel speaks to your inner geekness the most.  (If your color isn't listed, pick the closest. THERE IS NO "OTHER")

UPDATE: I added an option for those without cars. Because I give and give and give. ;o)

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Black comes in various warm

joe barry's picture

Black comes in various warm and cool temperatures but acts as blue in an earth palette. Don't believe me? Try mixing it with Yellow Ochre. Hmmmm ...still think its not a color? How about White? Same thing. Titanium White cools anything you add it to ...acting 'Bluish'. Workshop painters don't understand Black because Monet sucked when black was on his palette ...Workshop painters worship Monet and therefore must relegate Black to a non-color ...or secondary citizen ...because they suck. Black does not belong in the 'Jim Crow' coach on your palette folks, it's the "Queen of colors" ( Renoir ). I'm sure there are geeks who don't drink coffee either, but I'd never be confused for one of those.
Thank you. Feeling validated now :)

so, not that these are the

Anonymous's picture

so, not that these are the only worthy colors, but would you rather start with a black canvas or white canvas?

car color

Leslie Satenstein's picture

I do not own a car. I do not lease a car, but
if I had a car, it would be grey.

I used to own 3 cars, but now my 3 kids have them.

So I am chauffered, not always at the instant I want, but when it is mutually convenient.

No option for 'rust' ? What

Anonymous's picture

No option for 'rust' ? What is the world coming to...

Shoes...

r-haag's picture

My shoes are grey, but sometimes I wear the red (well maroon, or 'plum' if you will) ones. Do shoes count...they have become my vehicle while my legs are the motive force that move them/me. I chose 'clear'...maybe I should get a pair of Wonder Women boots...maybe not I could be arrested :)

Yellow. Powerful Mercedes

Harald Arnesen's picture

Yellow. Powerful Mercedes engine. My own uniformed driver (well, not exclusively my own driver, but I don't have to drive myself, which I hate).

I go by bus. Norwegian buses (the ones I use, at least) are yellow, made by Mercedes (they used to be, at least), and the driver used to have an uniform.

My GTi is black, my CC is

RW's picture

My GTi is black, my CC is black, my Street Bob is black, my Volvo 745t is black and my Cressida is Silver, so that averages out to black I'd say.

But why are white, black and grey "Possibly Not a Color"?

This comes from a common

Anonymous's picture

This comes from a common mis-perception propagated from the highly uninformed
workshop painters who have never heard of additive color vs. subtractive color and
don't understand the difference between absolute or theoretical Black vs. the pigment mixed with binder in tubes/buckets under various labels with 'black' in the name.

Black comes in various warm and cool temperatures but acts as blue in an earth palette. Don't believe me? Try mixing it with Yellow Ochre. Hmmmm ...still think
its not a color? How about White? Same thing. Titanium White cools anything you add it to ...acting 'Bluish'.

Workshop painters don't understand Black because Monet sucked when black was on his palette ...Workshop painters worship Monet and therefore must relegate Black to a non-color ...or secondary citizen ...because they suck. Black does not belong in the 'Jim Crow' coach on your palette folks, it's the "Queen of colors" ( Renoir ).

"Not found in nature" you say? Hmmm ...what's that in that tube of paint your holding? Calcined bone, soot, burnt wood. Theoretical Black is not the same as what's in paint tubes. Theoretical Black is not found in nature, however, Black pigment has served us well for centuries ...Don't accept substitutes.

It must be hard being ignorant.

blending colors

Anonymous's picture

if you speak as a scientist then black is the absence of color. If you blend colors you are speaking as an artist. If however you call someone ignorant then whatever color it is, it is only being seen from one side.

This goes beyond 'blending

Anonymous's picture

This goes beyond 'blending colors' and into the fundamental differences between
additive and subtractive color. Scientists refer to principles of light and painters must deal with properties of pigment,binders, resins and other paint additives.

Black has the same attributes as every other tubed color on a palette: tone, hue, chromaticity ...etc. Depending on which Black you choose. Classic genuine Ivory Black has a subtle purple-ish undertone for instance.

There's no getting around this: If you are a painter and you declare that Black is not a color and avoid it because you couldn't be bothered to pay attention in science class ...you are ignorant!

blender

Anonymous's picture

you answered "clear" didn't you?

If the lasso fits.

Anonymous's picture

If the lasso fits.

blended

Anonymous's picture

okay, that was good, I submit...

but, car-toon colors aside,

Anonymous's picture

but, car-toon colors aside, both definitions are correct, which was my point, and as my proof, these are from Mirriam-Websters definition for black, the 5th definition of the word:
a : characterized by the absence of light
b : reflecting or transmitting little or no light

I am a card carrying member of mensa, and we are often called many things, but rarely ignorant.

This post asks about paint on

Anonymous's picture

This post asks about paint on cars ...correct? I am not calling you ignorant or anyone posting here. I apologize if it was taken that way ...not intended.

Additive Color: dealing with light ( ie., *not* pigments, chemistry or paint )
True "absence" of light can only be experienced by peering through a peephole into a black velvet-lined box, or similar contrived scenario. Light is always present under normal circumstances ...so "Black" as defined by MW is of no concern to this conversation.

Subtractive color: dealing with chemistry, pigment or car paint
At issue is whether or not Black is a color: it is! Ask a chemist. You argue that Black paint could be considered to be a non-color ---- wrong! The context here is paint, so look up subtractive color. Mixing colors or pigments to produce a black paint does not result in "Additive" black, or "absence of light" ...or even a non-reflective, non-light transmitting substance.

Ivory Black, for instance, is the stock Black on painters palettes --- highly transparent -- both transmits light and it has subtle undertones of hues we more commonly associate with color. Black paint is never "Black".

There are physiological and psychological components to our perception of Black ....I digress

Anyway --- For the record, my "ignorant" comments are not directed at anyone posting here.

When scientists talk about

Anonymous's picture

When scientists talk about black they are not referring to paint. When painters
then say that black is not a color --- they are confusing subtractive and additive color ...in ignorance.

When painters refer to Black

Anonymous's picture

When painters refer to Black not being a color and avoid it due to their own misunderstanding --- they can only be considered ignorant. This goes back 100
years and is truly a painters misconception of the difference you outline in your post.

Color not necessarily significant

Roger T. Imai's picture

Color is not necessarily "personality-significant" in car ownership. My Honda is "pewter" (silver, I guess,) but I got it because it was the only color available for a 5-speed manual stick transmission. I would have gotten it if the only color was snot green or taxi-cab yellow. It's also 13 years old and still runs and handles GREAT. And has NEVER had engine trouble! Oh yeah, and I've never had a radio installed in it because I love the sound of my engine as I drive. And it sure as H*** has better mileage that most SUVs.

decisions, decisions

mwallette's picture

Let's see...how pedantic can I get? ;) Technically, I have no car...I have a truck and a motorcycle. So I *could* go with "clear (or I have no car)", but while that would be technically correct (more precisely, it would be...ahem..."retentive"), it would also throw off the spirit of what you are trying to do here. You covered the multi-vehicle option by instructing us to pick the one that shows off our inner geekiness the most. I identify more with the motorcycle than the truck, so that would make it "orange."

But wait...the motorcycle is only orange on the tank, some of the cowling and the rear body panels. The frame, the rest of the cowling, the handlebars, the front fender and a lot of other miscellaneous trim is "black" as is all of my riding gear (does that count as part of my vehicle?). What to do?

Orange.

No wait...yeah. Orange.

:)

Ahem.

Shawn Powers's picture

You sir, are why there is no "other" option. ;)

Shawn Powers is an Associate Editor for Linux Journal. You might find him chatting on the IRC channel, or Twitter

<grin>

mwallette's picture

Sweet -- my post was taken as intended :)

I have no car...

Charles's picture

... but my boat, F/V Hogswallup, is purple.

Cannot see where to add my

RhianG's picture

Cannot see where to add my stainless steel DeLorian which has no paint at all, so I guess it is clear.

Currently Black

corfy's picture

My current car (for the last two years or so) is black (specifically, a 2004 Dodge Neon).

My car before that was maroon (1995 Oldsmobile Cutlass Cierra... or is that Cierra Cutlass? I forget which, but it was one of those).

Before that, my car was a dark green (1995 Dodge Neon).

The car before that, which was my first car, was light lime green (1977 Chevrolet Chevette). I combined the name "Chevette" with my last name and called it the "Corfette." So far, it is the only car I've owned that I've named.

http://www.corfyscorner.com/pix/corfette.jpg

Talk about "green snot"...

----
Laugh at life or life will laugh at you.

Some real geeks use public

adl73x's picture

Some real geeks use public transport by choice.
Or maybe they live in New York.
Real geeks need an OTHER.

But you're right...

Shawn Powers's picture

A no car option seems apropos. Thanks. :)

Shawn Powers is an Associate Editor for Linux Journal. You might find him chatting on the IRC channel, or Twitter

Thank you. Feeling validated

adl73x's picture

Thank you. Feeling validated now :)

I'm sure there are geeks who don't drink coffee either, but I'd never be confused for one of those.

That'd be me

corfy's picture

I'm a geek who doesn't drink coffee! (Actually, I can't stand the smell of coffee, which makes it very hard to drink.)

Of course, just because I don't drink coffee, don't assume I don't drink caffeine. I just get my caffeine from different sources.

----
Laugh at life or life will laugh at you.

BUT...

Shawn Powers's picture

Since we're geeks, we'd get 100% "Other", thus ruining my highly scientific poll. :)

(Because really, my truck isn't red, it's Crimson Apple.. My car isn't green, it's Metallic Seafoam... etc.)

I'm just waiting for the contingent of brown car owners to lynch me. ;)

Shawn Powers is an Associate Editor for Linux Journal. You might find him chatting on the IRC channel, or Twitter

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