Using Django and MongoDB to Build a Blog

How Python and Django Communicate with MongoDB

You will need a Python module called PyMongo to talk to MongoDB from Python. On a Debian 7 system, you can install it as follows:


# apt-get install python-pymongo
Reading package lists... Done
Building dependency tree    
Reading state information... Done
The following extra packages will be installed:
  python-bson python-bson-ext python-gridfs python-pymongo-ext
The following NEW packages will be installed:
  python-bson python-bson-ext python-gridfs python-pymongo 
  ↪python-pymongo-ext
0 upgraded, 5 newly installed, 0 to remove and 0 not upgraded.
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After this operation, 928 kB of additional disk space will be used.
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The following instructional Python code (saved as connect.py) connects to a MongoDB database, prints the available databases of the mongodb://localhost:27017 server and closes the MongoDB connection:


import pymongo
# Open the MongoDB connection
connMongo = pymongo.Connection('mongodb://localhost:27017')
# Print the available MongoDB databases
print connMongo.database_names()
# Close the MongoDB connection
connMongo.close()

You can run the small Python script as follows:


$ python connect.py 
[u'LJ', u'local', u'test']

The output shows that at the time of running the script, three databases exist called LJ, local and test. Although PyMongo will not be used directly in the rest of the article, it is useful to know about it for testing and troubleshooting purposes.

Generally speaking, Django has a wrapper for every relational database it supports, but Mongo is a non-relational database, so you need some external help. You need the MongoEngine Python package in order to utilize MongoDB. Other options are Ming, MongoKit, django-mongodb and django-nonrel. In my opinion, MongoEngine is the best option.

MongoEngine is an object-document mapper made for MongoDB, following Django's ORM style. You can install it by executing this command:


# apt-get install python-mongoengine

MongoEngine is based on PyMongo, and that's why you need to know some basic things about PyMongo.

For those of you who are familiar with Django, you should know that when you are using MongoEngine, you lose both the Django Admin panel and the python manage.py syncdb command. Losing the Django Admin panel is a major drawback, but MongoDB offers features that relational databases cannot provide.

The Problem

Imagine you registered a new domain to host your personal site. The site also will have a blog. Instead of using a CMS, such as Joomla! or WordPress, for creating the blog, you want more control over the site, so you decide to use Django for creating the blog and MongoDB for storing the blog data.

The nice thing about this solution is that if you already are familiar with Django, it will not take more than two hours to develop, test and deliver a complete version of the blog site.

Note: the solution presented here tries to be as Django-native as possible. The only thing different from the usual Django way is the use of MongoDB.

The Solution

If you try to access a MongoDB that does not already exist, MongoDB will create it. The same happens if you try to write to a MongoDB collection (table) that does not exist. So, you do not need to execute any commands on MongoDB, but you should be very careful not to have any typos in your code.

Do the following steps on Django.

1) Create a new project called LJ:


$ django-admin.py startproject LJ
$ cd LJ

The manage.py script is created for every Django project and is a wrapper around django-admin.py. You do not need to make any changes to it.

2) Run the test development Web server to see if everything is okay:


$ python manage.py runserver

By going to http://localhost:8000/ (or http://127.0.0.1:8000/), you will see Figure 2.

Figure 2. The Test Development Web Server

The test development server restarts automatically every time you make changes to the Django project.

3) Create the app for the blog called LJblog:


$ python manage.py startapp LJblog

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