The Tiny Internet Project, Part II

If you're planning to deploy multiple Proxmox hosts and form a cluster, I recommend reserving the lower range of your chosen subnet—which is 10.128.1.1 to 10.128.1.255—so you can keep things logical. For example, you could give pve01 10.128.1.2 and pve02 10.128.1.3, and then start your DNS servers at 10.128.1.4.

Once you enter a password on the next screen, the installation will begin. After about five minutes, you'll be prompted to reboot. The initial boot screen looks like any Grub menu, and if all goes well, you'll end up with a login screen and a welcome telling you where to point your web browser: https://10.128.1.2:8006.

Figure 6. Proxmox is ready.

If you used a different IP address, that IP will appear instead. Later, after you've set up your domain, you'll be able to access the server at https://pve.tiny.lab:8006.

For now though, the IP is the only way in.

3. Confirm network settings on your Proxmox host. Unlike a typical Linux network setup, the Proxmox host uses bridged ports. Where you'd typically see eth0 and eth1, on Proxmox you'll see vmbr0 and vmbr1.

To get the two Proxmox host NICs to work properly, you'll need to edit the network interfaces file. From the pve login screen, log in using the user name "root" and the password you set during installation. Make a copy of the interfaces file (for safekeeping), then edit the original:


# cd /etc/network/
# cp interfaces interfaces.bak
# vi interfaces

When you first open the file, it'll look something like this:


[
auto lo
iface lo inet loopback

iface eth0 inet manual

iface eth1 inet manual
]

This isn't going to work for your purposes. You need to set up a static bridged address to eth0 and a static bridged address to eth1. First, set the interface that will communicate with your private network (tiny.lab):


[
auto lo
iface lo inet loopback

#iface eth0 inet manual (comment out or delete)

#iface eth1 inet manual (comment out or delete)

auto vmbr0
iface vmbr0 inet static
        address  10.128.1.2
        netmask  255.255.255.0
        dns-nameservers 10.128.1.3 10.128.1.4
        dns-search tiny.lab
        bridge_ports eth0
        bridge_stp off
        bridge_fd 0
]

Note that the interface bridges to eth0, but eth0 itself is not configured here. That's on purpose. Now, configure the second NIC to communicate with your public network (the network in your house or classroom that connects to the internet):


[
auto vmbr1
iface vmbr1 inet static
        address  192.168.1.75
        netmask  255.255.255.0
        gateway  192.168.1.1
        dns-nameservers 8.8.8.8 8.8.4.4
        bridge_ports eth1
        bridge_stp off
        bridge_fd 0
]

A couple things to note here. The address—192.168.1.75—is any free address on your public network. Don't pick this at random; make sure the address is available.

Also note that there is no gateway address on the first interface. That's because you can have just one gateway on a machine connected to multiple networks. Also, the dns-nameservers are set to 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4, Google's public nameservers. You can use these or the nameservers provided from your ISP or school. Finally, note that this vmbr1 interface bridges to eth1.

Save the file and reboot.

4. Set up your private network devices. From this point forward, you'll do most of your work from your administration PC, not the Proxmox host.

In order to connect other machines to your Proxmox host, you'll need to place your Proxmox server and your administration PC on the same network. That requires a network switch or router.

If you're using a router, preferably one with wireless capabilities, you can set it up with a base LAN address of 10.128.1.1. That will become its gateway address (even though you won't use it for that). If your router includes a DHCP server (most do), the device will hand out IP addresses to all the computers you attach to your tiny internet network automatically.

Figure 7. Router Setup

______________________

John S. Tonello is Director of IT for NYSERNet, Inc., in Syracuse, New York. He's been a Linux user and enthusiast since he installed his first Slackware system from diskette 20 years ago. You can follow him @johntonello.