The Tails Project's The Amnesic Incognito Live System (Tails)

Making delirious dictators worldwide quake in their boots, the Tails Project recently announced numerous improvements to its anonymity-obsessed Linux distro, The Amnesic Incognito Live System, aka Tails. Now in version 0.7, Tails is the spiritual successor of the well-known Incognito Live System and is developed with the support of the Tor Project, an onion routing project originally developed to protect US military communications. The live distro, which runs on any PC powerful enough to run Windows XP, is based on Debian Live and runs directly from CD and/or USB Flash memory. No trace is left after using Tails, thanks to many features, such as independent operation of all software and all hardware drivers from the PC's operating system, no permanent data storage and all the channeling of all Internet connections through the Tor anonymization network. "With Tails", say the distro developers, "we provide a tongue and a pen protected by state-of-the-art cryptography to guarantee...basic human rights and allow journalists worldwide to work and communicate freely and without fear of reprisal." The journalists of these pages humbly salute the valiant effort.

http://tails.boum.org

______________________

James Gray is Products Editor for Linux Journal

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Hmmm. I tried the digital

Anonymous's picture

Hmmm. I tried the digital version.....blech. LJ just does not get it. I pay for editorial content, not "timeliness". That I can get anywhere... Not to mention "form factor"....sigh. There goes another one...

Copy and Paste

Anonymous's picture

So, if it's a copy and paste article, do you have a URL for where it was copied from?

down hill

Linux user's picture

Copy and paste article, yes anyone could have done this one. Linux Journal has gone down hill over the last 2 years, re-writing articles from other Linux magazines and not putting much, if any real world content into the magazine. I got a card saying they are going to web based only subscriptions, why even bother at this point. If i didn't already pay for my subscription i would cancel, i will just let it run out. Sad to see Linux not being showcased the way it should be. Too many stupid articles about smart phones and advertisements for me, not to mention do-nothing articles about finding future dates and crap only programmers would be into. oh-well. Bye Linux Journal. RIP 2011

I totally agree. I sent a

Anonymous's picture

I totally agree. I sent a formal complain to Linux Journal about this particular writer. I suggest everyone here does the same!

Contrary to the writeup, any

Anonymous's picture

Contrary to the writeup, any hard drives are simply not mounted. However, the user can sudo -i into the root account and mount any hard drive, which is best done after disabling the network, saving any download from RAM to hard drive, and then unmounting the hard drive prior to re-enabling the network.

@James D'Angelo: How the hell

Anonymous's picture

@James D'Angelo:

How the hell did this guy get to write for Linux Journal? I know teenage kids that can write better and have the intelligence to do at least 2 minutes of research on the topic they're writing about.

Could It Happen Here

James D'Angelo's picture

Anon:

Also did the writer even see that there was already a write up on this distro.

But while this is designed for authoritian states, what about potential uses here in the USA

Here in the USA?

Anonymous's picture

What makes you think everyone reading LJ is in the USA?

Incorrect.

Anonymous's picture

recently announced

Their last release was 3 months ago...

Now in version 0.7

Actually it's at version 0.7.2.

Did you even bother to read their home page before writing this article?

Now its version 8...

Anonymous's picture

Now its version 8...

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