Spotlight on Linux: PCLinuxOS 2010

The long anticipated release of PCLinuxOS 2010 finally arrived a few weeks ago and reviews have been overwhelmingly positive. Even with the new crew and new features, it's still very much PCLOS. Easy-to-use, lots of features, and stability are its hallmarks, but this release adds high performance to that list.

By using the BFS, PCLOS is reported to perform faster than ever. BFS is a low latency desktop scheduler designed for high performance. The foundation of this release is Linux 2.6.32.11, Xorg X Server 1.6.5, GCC 4.4.1, and KDE 4.4.2.

Another interesting trait of PCLinuxOS is its use of alternative applications. It comes with the standards, Firefox, GIMP, and OpenOffice.org (in the form of an install script), but it also adds some handy extras that other distros leave to the user to install. But that doesn't mean PCLinuxOS doesn't have a very extensive online software repository. In fact, it's probably one of the most complete of the independent community distributions.

This has actually been a hallmark of PCLOS. Developers are constantly updating the repository and so much so that PCLOS is considered a "rolling release." This means that one shouldn't have to do a complete reinstall each release, although a couple releases required fresh installs over the years. But for the most part, if one keeps their system updated a fresh install isn't required.

Being complete with extra drivers and multimedia support is probably the handiest feature of PCLinuxOS. Many wireless Ethernet and graphic chips work out-of-the-box with PCLOS. In addition, most multimedia files play without further configuration on the part of the user, including online streaming and Flash media.

The live CD boot process hasn't change much, other than less questions to answer to reach the desktop. The network may most likely be enabled at boot. The PCLOS system appearance has received a bit of a face-lift as well as a new mascot. The Mandriva-derived installer hasn't changed much either, still one of the easiest to use.

Also borrowed from Mandriva is their control center. The customized PCLOS Control Center is scaled down a bit from its Mandriva counterpart with a lot of the enterprise-class options removed, but it's the place to go to configure your computer system. From configuring your hardware to setting up a firewall, the PCC is the place to do it. For desktop customization such as window behavior and desktop fonts, the KDE System Settings is the tool.

Perhaps trumping all the technical aspects of this distro is a sense of ownership for its users. PCLinuxOS is one of the best examples of the "community distro." The small band of developers take suggestions and cues from their users very much to heart and even solicit opinions, artwork, and software requests. This is perhaps the key to PCLOS' success. It allows the community to feel not only involved, but important to development. They all can feel as though they contributed at least in some small way.

A few weeks after version 2010 was unleashed, 2010.1 was released with the addition of new drivers and some bug fixes. If you currently have a 2010 install, you can update through the easy-to-use APT front-end Synaptic package management system. Visit pclinuxos.com for more information. Make use of the forum for questions and discussions - or to express your suggestions for the next release.

______________________

Susan Linton is a Linux writer and the owner of tuxmachines.org.

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attitudes

Cecil's picture

I write about that actually. It's listed as one of the top 10 reasons that linux and open source in general will never achieve its full potential. endogamy of ideas of methods, clannishness, hatred of dissension and the list goes on. One of these days there will be some unity, and linux will jump to the #2 OS in the world. Then they will realize that maybe the other guys were #1 and #2 for a reason and stop hating every single aspect of those OSs. Then they will jump to #1, and many many open source projects will follow.
PCLOS is already on that path, it's an oddball that says anyone should be able to use Linux without years of experience. They are now developing into the same bunch of l33t guys, who don't like suggestions, outside influence or ideas. Thus, sadly, PCLOS will evolve into something that is just as unfriendly to the 96% of computer user who don't run linux.
Again, it's been another decade so Ill sin and suggest that maybe using linux should be easy, maybe it shouldn't be a pain to gain access to your cd drive and maybe, just maybe there is something to be learned from those OS running on the other 96% of computers.
Case sensitivity is the greatest irritation for users and strongest evidence that creativity is short to be served in the community at large.
Someday when I have more than 4 minutes to waste, I think I'll start I flavor of Linux that doesn't taste so much like...well linux.
The fact that MS has released windows 7, the worst OS ever, and the Linux community doesn't hear a clarion call to deliberately produce a friendly to the masses alternative to windows to transition users, is insane. Tie your own ropes, I'll hope for the best and see you guys again in yet another 5-10 years.

haters!?

Wes's picture

lol at the comment up there about how you can't say a good thing about PCLinuxOS without haters coming out of the woodwork. No, what you can't say is a single BAD thing about PCLinuxOS without PCL people calling you names. I've seen it over and over again, and the PCL forums are pretty well known for it. It's far from a unique event to see someone say they like PCLinux but won't use it because the forum people including the mods have attitudes and are, quite simply, mean.

ahhhhh

Bret McKenzie's picture

Just wanna do somethin special for all the ladies in the world.

Huh...??

Dulwithe's picture

Huh...??? You lost me on this comment.

PCLinuxOS

Geordie's picture

I hate vista, & tried the live cd of Ubuntu, loved the speed but it wouldnt detect my wi-fi so I uninstalled it. this version did & I must say loooks lovely but I havent a clue how to use it. some basic pointers would be handy & I'm not sure about command strings so 1 click stuff would be ideal, I can fly round windows with my eyes shut but some of the references to things are worded differently so am not sure plz help but dont confuse me ok....ps no I'm not a dummy just a newbie at Linux

What do you want to do...?

Dulwithe's picture

What do you want to do with PCLOS??

Reply, and I'll watch this thread and see if I can give you guidance.

I'd recommend the PCLOS forums, but the server seems to be down right now.

D.

Comparing

johnh3's picture

I using PCLinuxOS 200.1 at the moment and I like it. But would nice to a see a review of the new Pardus 2009.2 to compare it to PCLinuxOS. Its "work out of the box" to with dvd movies and mediacodecs etc..
So much is similar between them:

http://www.osor.eu/studies/a-new-kid-on-the-block-the-turkish-pardus-lin...

http://www.pardus.org.tr/eng/

Before it was only a Turkish version but now they got a English/International version to.

Anyway thanks for a interesting review.

2010 customized fine, but how to put it on USB / Optical Dsk?

Ego's picture

hi, ppl! pls advise how do i put my customized pclos2010 (incl.ooffice) to a ("Live CD"? actually, Live OptD for the increased size; or) an USB Flash Drive? i couldn't find any such utility anywhere as in the good old 2009 distros - which is MUCH disappointing.

MyLiveCD

Angela's picture

You need to install draklive-install from the synaptic then in a terminal type:
umount -a If it is already unmounted then in the terminal type
mylivecd --lzma --md5sum mylivecd.iso It will then start making your liveCD/DVD.

Worked like a charm for me.

Have a good day and good luck.

...and here come the Haters

Anonymous's picture

It looks like the staff of Linux Journal is about to discover something that we of the PCLinuxOS fanbase has been aware of for years:

You cannot say one solitary positive thing about this little, tiny Linux distro without a deluge from the ubiquitous and omnipresent Haters jumping out of hoo-doos to strike you down with all of their hatred and anger. You laugh and call it paranoia now, but just you watch and see.

There are several basic Anti-PCLOS Armies out there:

... the 'SexLess' from the 'Doo-Doo Brown Distro' who wanna make their goofy African name synonymous with 'Linux'; they tell Newbies on IRC, "don't play with PCLinuxOS, they look too much like Windows" ...

... the 'Adam begot Cain' crowd of OCD whiners who moan that 'Mandrake/Mandriva begot PCLinuxOS in her belly' all the time, but never heard of GNU ...

... the bored 'Everybody's Computer Guy' who hates the fact that PCLinuxOS takes away his secret powers of making people depend on him to fix their computers or 'teach them Linux' ...

... the 'washed-up and has-been Geezer-Tinker' sitting in his basement for hours compiling everything from Source on his old 486; bitter at PCLinuxOS for all that 'prettiness' and not making people type into Command Line terminals for everything and 'Learn Linux' like they had to back in the 90s ...

... the Poor Foreigner who just now heard of PCLinuxOS and hates it because he'd previously put up with the failings of his Nifty Nomenclature distro that didn't configure his WiFi or Video Card because he 'really just wanted something for free, whether it actually works or not' ...

... the UN*X Army who HATE M$ Windows and worship at the Cult of Steve Jobs; thinks that PCLinuxOS is only to aspire to be 'Apple for poor people' and 'if you want a Linux that works, get a Mac' nonsense ...

... the Earth-Shoe Army of the 'Open-Toed, Open-Source Only' variety who bemoan the fact that if PCLinuxOS was REALLY counter-revolutionary it wouldn't play MP3s and other media 'right out-of-the-box like that, they'd make you hunt and do your homework first' ...

... the Uber-Hater Narcissists who think they can hide anonymously behind their computer screens and spew venom into every comment box and forum they can find. They abuse the online free-content intentions of mags like Linux Journal by constantly complaining about a 'Free Lunch'. They come to comments boxes on Linux Journal having ruined sites like YouTube with their Hate-Speech ...

... the Bad-Breath Brigade whose lack of social skills has led them to cower at their PCs and provoke argument on technical topics as a means to show their expertise in this one area of semi-public discourse; succinctly: they just want a conversation and people to talk to where it's not so 'scary'. See the Lonesome Goober who did a gazillion posts on 64-bit computing in these comments, and the Shut-In who only wanted to talk about ZEN-Gnome PCLOS for an example of these Winners ...

You make good sense. I have

Anonymous's picture

You make good sense. I have dabbled in Linux since the late 90's and while I like many things about it, for me, it still can't beat Windows.

I have used every version of Windows since 3.11 for Work Groups. Vista was fine, 90% of the crap people say about it is just them regurgitating what "they heard". It's mostly BS. Windows 7 is great, very fast and solid, really a great OS.

But for years I have tried to get Linux to work for me. Early on, the problem was that I always had bleeding edge hardware 2 or 3 times a year, and I was not willing to downgrade my computer in order to run this "awesome and cutting-edge OS". That seems ludicrous to me, call me crazy.

Today, the distros have come a long way. I hate command lines. A computer is an appliance. I want to turn it on, do what I need it to do, and I don't want to have to roll up my sleeves and force and bend it to my will. Some geeks get off on that, but I think that their time might be better spent having intimate relations with an actual partner and less time being l337.

That said, I like the idea of a free OS, that is updated more than every 3 years, and that is more customizable. And I like that some distros like PCLOS and Suse help bring that ability to the masses.

Sure, it does make it more like Windows in that it gets easier and easier. But isn't that a good thing? People want to USE their computer, not mess with it all the time to get it to do simple things that Windows and a Mac does with 2 clicks out of the box.

I don't care how technically superior Linux may be under the hood. If the user experience is not easy and fun, then I won't use it.

PCLOS has always been one of my favs, and I have tried them all, even spending decent money($1000+) over the years on various retail distros.

The haters most likely fall into the category of believing that they are more l337 by using Linux, and that if the average Joe can now use it, that their status is taken away.

Who cares if it is easy? What benefit is there to doing things the hard way? LOL

So rock on PCLOS. If I was not a PC gamer, I would use Linux exclusively, and it would be either PCLOS or Suse.

On the issue of 'Adam begot

Anonymous's picture

On the issue of 'Adam begot Cain,' I also tend to be a bit bemused by people making a big deal out of PCLinuxOS having its roots back in Mandrake. Not only has PCLOS evolved since then (and now has all packages built from in-house sources, as others have pointed out), but have we forgotten that Mandrake started out as a derivative of Red Hat with KDE bolted onto it? Just as Mandrake evolved many of its own customizations and really came into its own over time, PCLOS should be allowed to do the same.

ZEN-mini 2010

siamer's picture

Hello.

ZEN-mini 2010 was totally rebuilded as a PCLinuxOS 2010. I tried to make it as stable and fast as possible. Soon will be next release will fixed all bugs (I really hope so - tomorrow starting work on that)...

"1. Grub is a flub... it missed my existing 2009 PCLOS partition installations, and eventually bungled my entire setup. Furious, I got out my 2009.4 ZenMini CD. Upon reverting via the 2009 LiveCD, I noticed THAT version of GRUB found everything.

2. Gparted wants to reboot for every partition change (2009 versions didn't)... hey, this reminds me of a company up in Redmond: REboot, REboot, REboot.

3. No matter how many times I tell ZenMini 2010 to format/install with ext3, it uses ext2. ZenMini 2009 gave no such problem. Zen 2010 is SLOWER on same machine.

4. OVERALL System response is SLOWER with the 'NEW' 2010 versions of PCLOS.

5. Video problems with LXDE and ZenMini 2010 running at 1920x1080. No problem upon reinstall of 2009 versions. Why can't 2010 set video params properly, as in 2009?

New themes are fine, but focus on keeping the BASE INSTALLATION MOVING FORWARD. "

1)Grub is the same in 2009 and 2010 so it's strainge... still using Grub 1 not Grub 2 ofcourse...
2) are You sure it's ZEN bug not Gpartet ? (will check it - didn't hear about that before...)
3) On my laptop is ok but I heard about that problem so I will check it as well. Hard to belive that is slower...
4) response is SLOWER ? Hard to belive... System is much faster than version 2009 (many users said that...) even in Vbox is working faster than version 2009...

This is first release from new builded system so now I can just fix the bugs and make it more stable...

Thanks for info about bugs - will check all of them ;)

there was no "2009.4 ZenMini CD" last one from 2009 was 2009.2 - just want let You know :P

Regards,
siamer

BTW, when I say my mouse is

Anonymous's picture

BTW, when I say my mouse is 'jittery' in Zen 2010, I mean ALL the time, whether static (sitting in one spot) or moving.

Problem with Mouse

Asoka's picture

I have had this problem (mouse) with many of the Linux distributions but not with PCLinux.

There are at least two reasons.

There are many makes of mouse. Many of them do not follow high standard of manufacture and wear and tear is also high.

Old makes (standard and good manufacturers) are sturdy but many of the new ones coming from Asia are bad.

This is true for keyboards too and often live CDs find it difficult to configure keys but figure out the mouse movements somehow.

The other reason is the faulty mouse (often this is the case).

Solution to this is to have several makes of mouse / key boards with you.
And stick to the best makes that suits you.

My key board which is 12 years old is working fine and I have thrown away (call them junk items) dozens of mouses and key boards due to faulty manufacture.

It is like buying cars with very bad tires which is not a good practice.

Buy a good brand and when in use give them the due respect.

Do not blame the developers or the distributions for faulty mouse which is really unfair.

Less 'Hype', more Promotion.

Anonymous's picture

Oops, my error on ZenMini version; I was thinking of LXDE 2009.4

NOTE: there is one other significant bug in the current Zen 2010 ISO:

Redo-MBR fails with a module error because it was incorrectly built using the KDE version. Users must uninstall it, and then find and install the -Gnome- version of Redo-MBR from the repository.

Yes, Redo-MBR can probably be done via the CLI, but potential Windows 'converts' won't want to touch a CLI and will be really annoyed if their MBR gets corrupted on a dual-boot system.

This, along with the GParted reboot issue, can be problematic for new Linux 'converts' and part-time Unix/Linux 'hacks' such as myself (not a CLI expert).

All my hardware is 5+ years old, so perhaps on a newer machine the BFS works better; with Zen 2010 my P3 has a jittery/blinky mouse cursor, whereas with 2009.2 it is smooth as silk.

My critique is well-intended because PCLOS 2009 was the most polished installation I had ever encountered with Unix/Linux. The stability and functionality was/is supreme! This new release is starting to resemble 'Vista'... i.e. the marketing hype didn't hold up against user's experiences, and the rest is Win7 history.

Vista probably drove a number of people to consider Linux, yet wouldn't it be ironic if the over-hyping of PCLOS 2010 and Lynx drove them back to Windows7?

I don't want to see PCLOS lose momentum and critical mass with 2010; it is not as smooth as 2009. The website implied this release was merely a newer update, not a complete rewrite. As anyone with experience knows, rewrites are inherently buggy.

Promote, don't hype. On each download link/page, the PCLinuxOS.com staff should be advising people to promptly update their distro after installation. This step is not as obvious with the removal of 'update-notifier' from the base installations... another ill-conceived change, considering 2010 is a full rewrite.

IMO, a FULL repo and all iso's for PCLOS 2009 should be available until 2011.

Anyway, I've just registered at PCLinuxOS.com, see you over in the forums!

Not everyone wants to convert people, Loudmouth

Anonymous's picture

Sir, seems as though your comments are better suited for the PCLinuxOS forums (spec ZEN-Gnome pages) than this review of the 2010 KDE flavor; not to speak of your "intentions".

Less hype? You're on the wrong page and you're scolding about less hype by distraction?

This quote is asinine: "Vista probably drove a number of people to consider Linux, yet wouldn't it be ironic if the over-hyping of PCLOS 2010 and Lynx drove them back to Windows7?"

Your sense of irony notwithstanding; it is a common misconception that Linux all want to convert people, particularly from Windows.

Rubbish. Poppycock. Nonsense.

A whole lot of PCLinuxOS rabid fanbase believe that people are free to use M$ or Apple or Ubuntu or whatever they chose to.

We know that at The End Of The Day: people of intelligence/education need to leave the masses to their own devices.

I am a Windows user looking for FASTER desktops

Anonymous's picture

Okay, FYI here is a recent post from a typical Linux blog:

I am a Windows user looking for FASTER desktops for older single core machines (usually P3 or P4 and >1 GHz). I have setup a few PCs with a multi-boot environment including WinXP, and a large selection of LINUX distros.

As a windows user, I am unfamiliar with Linux commands. I can follow instructions posted on the internet to add or change features in a distribution, but don’t know if what I am reading is applicable or correct for a particular distribution.

What I really need is a distro which automounts all other drive partitions that it finds that are NOT recognized as operating systems. Or, at least provides me with a simple check box to automount them.

...

This is what I am looking for in a LINUX disto, and I’m trying dozens of them. Some don’t want to install in partition-12 and beyond, but there seems to be no shortage of new distributions each month. So I have many more to try.

Rgds,
fgk002

You see my friend, your response to my comment about Vista, etc tells me you are the typical Linux knuckle-head without a clue about who is in the market for Linux or, for that matter, how to treat newcomers.

I'll have you know that I politely directed him to the PCLOS site and suggested the appropriate distros, along with my recommendation that he immediately remove the BFS (Badly F*cked Scheduler) kernel and replace it with the standard CFS so he can run Synergy. BFS kills the Synergy client and --restart fails.

BFS was an ill-conceived change to PCLOS at this point in time.

Not so fast... KEEP 2009.2

Anonymous's picture

Texstar posted in forums: "PCLOS 2009 repo is closing."

This is truly ill-conceived. PCLOS finally gains critical mass -- 2009.2 was/is WONDERFULLY stable -- and those repositories will now be closed?!

I just learned, via a PCLOS forum post, that PCLOS 2010 is a -complete- rewrite... wish I'd known this beforehand! The PCLinuxOS.com site really needs better archives and branch disclosure... e.g. the FreeBSD.org site.

BIG mistake to delete the repository for 2009. I understand you can't provide support, but a FULL repository should be available until 2011.

So far, out of 4 'flavors' of PCLOS 2010, 3 have a sour taste (buggy). The 2010 cheerleading doesn't convince those of us coming from 2009.2

Posted a few months ago about ubuntu issuing a weak release in 2010, little did I know the PCLOS crew would shoot themselves in the foot.

Careful with that gun to your head boys... '2010' is too unpredictable.

Gold Standard

Asoka's picture

PCLinux is my Gold Standard for Live CDs.
I give a score of 750 points for a Live CD that works.
PC Linux get 1200 points.
I do not like bloated images of Suse and Mandriva which starts slow at boot time and in use.
I agree that PCLinux 2009.2 was the best distribution I have used after saying "Good Bye" to Mandriva and Suse.
Yes there are some glitches with grub and downloads but unlike Suse it keeps my Var/ and Temp/ partitions clean every time I download an iso and deposit it in a fat partition as an archive to free my Linux systems.
I have downloaded nearly 50 Isos without a problem but it was a pain in the neck with Suse and Mandriva.
Two other distributions I have in my computer are Mepis (Debian derivative) and Berry (Rehat derivative) Linux.
I no longer have Suse and Mandriva in none of my 7 computers.
My daughter's Microsoft busted and I saved her day by recovering (mostly photos) her files and installing PCLinux 2009.2.

PCLinux utility as a Live CD is its strength and should develop this potential like Debian (Debian is the best for me) and Damn Small linux and Tinyme.

I showed her the new version but she politely told me I am happy with what I have.
Compize works better with the new version and if one is not happy with one version one can try other versions including Enlightenment 17.

Zen is of the light weight category is probably the candidate for upgrading the Grub and partitioning with the same flavour as Debian's gParted or Debian's ultimate.
My only grouse with PCLinux is that it does not have good games as it was at the time of PCLinux2007.
If you do not like PCLinux why not try others and have a multi-boot system?
Please visit my blogspot at Googles........linx100century or just type Asoka and parafox to read my comments about other Live CDs.
Linuxmint has a OEM version and I hope PCLinux will develop a Server version or activate its server version which is inactive now.
I do not have a copy of Big Daddy in my archives.
Please somebody let me have a copy of it.
One must look after the history and giving credit to Mandriva is OK.
Mandrake which I used left us high and dry and I had to switch to Suse.
PCLinux should remember its humble beginning (do not forget old guys like us).

If they did not leave Mandriva and did not take the plunge where would be the guys(like me) who disagree with the GREED?
Good Luck PCLinux and Keep your history intact and especially the Big Daddy!
You are my Gold Standard!

a copy of Big Daddy

DeBaas's picture

http://archives.pclosusers.com/

The answer on your Big Daddy question.

Ed

Big Daddy

Asoka's picture

Thanks for your help.
I was downloading Big Daddy and minutes later (got through Softpedia) the site manger deleted the image.
I did not know where to look for?
I a' going to try it now.
Thanks again.

Asoka

Downloaded Big Daddy

Asoka's picture

I downloaded Big Daddy (and Junior too) without a hitch.
Live is reminded me the old times!
It try to install, just for the kick but could not.
I am keeping it in my archive.
Thanks again.

One step forward, TWO STEPS BACKWARD...

Anonymous's picture

I've tried 3 different 'flavors' of PCLOS 2010, and find myself REVERTING back to the 2009.2 and 2009.4 versions. Problem now is, I can't find update repositories.

After spending a weekend 'upgrading' ZenMini, LXDE, and Gnome (PCLOS 2010) I have given up... exasperated by several buggy issues introduced with the 2010 releases.

1. Grub is a flub... it missed my existing 2009 PCLOS partition installations, and eventually bungled my entire setup. Furious, I got out my 2009.4 ZenMini CD. Upon reverting via the 2009 LiveCD, I noticed THAT version of GRUB found everything.

2. Gparted wants to reboot for every partition change (2009 versions didn't)... hey, this reminds me of a company up in Redmond: REboot, REboot, REboot.

3. No matter how many times I tell ZenMini 2010 to format/install with ext3, it uses ext2. ZenMini 2009 gave no such problem. Zen 2010 is SLOWER on same machine.

4. OVERALL System response is SLOWER with the 'NEW' 2010 versions of PCLOS.

5. Video problems with LXDE and ZenMini 2010 running at 1920x1080. No problem upon reinstall of 2009 versions. Why can't 2010 set video params properly, as in 2009?

New themes are fine, but focus on keeping the BASE INSTALLATION MOVING FORWARD.

Dell Precision M70 laptop 2.26 GHz (Gnome 2009)
Dell Precision 450 Dual Xeon 2.8 GHz (Gnome & ZEN) REVERTED
ASUS PB2-S (440BX) with Pentium3 600 MHz (LXDE & ZEN) REVERTED

All three machines work great with PCLOS 2009, but 2010 has been a BIG LET-DOWN.

What has happened? In the forums, it seems more people are wrestling with 2010.

find update repositories

DeBaas's picture

http://www.pclinuxos.com/forum/index.php/topic,72364.0.html

The info about older repos and how and where to keep you PCLinuxOS 2009 in good order can be found there.

Ed

Thanks Ed, will follow up on

Anonymous's picture

Thanks Ed, will follow up on that link now.

Another major issue with ZEN-Mini 2010... 'Redo-MBR' does NOT work because they built it using the KDE version of Redo-MBR (Zen is Gnome). Users need to install the Gnome version from the repository.

This is the sort of item that MUST be checked (along with GParted bug) BEFORE the ISO is (re)built or released to the masses. Zen has taken a step backward in 2010.

The full Gnome version seems to be okay, but Grub and GParted still have bugs.

What happened to the AUTO-UPDATE feature, which was found in all 2009 versions?

Old versions

DeBaas's picture

Be aware, the old versions, 2009 and before, are no longer supported.
For PCLinuxOS 2010 KDE related questions, bugs and suggestions look in:
http://www.pclinuxos.com/forum/
For PCLinuxOS 2010 Gnome:
http://linuxgator.org/forums/

Ed

update-notifier > auto-updater

DeBaas's picture

update-notifier
update-notifier is a tool to automatically check for new updates

It's still in the repo's, not installed by default.

Ed

Goodbye Ubuntu and Linux Mint, Welcome PCLinuxOS...

Ezequiel's picture

The subject says everything, this version of PCLinuxOS is very good, tried an earlier version and didn't liked it, but this 2010 version made me come back to pclinuxos, only comment to the developers, please make the OS installation GUI more friendly...:)

PCLOS is Tops for many

Anonymous's picture

I have to chuckel at this thread. Distros remind me of Cars.
And how alot of men and some women will battle whos better ford chevy etc etc. Linux distro folks seem to be not much diffrent.

Ive used many over the years I liked them all. Some better than others
PCLOS is one of the top 3. Along with OpenSuse and Ubuntu.

Why is that, casue those three are the best and or more suited in marketing and turnkey to winbloz users and SOHO's. The others are good too just to geeky for the avg 9-5 pc user.

If PCLOS 2010 could do spots like Mac vs PC did.. There be bunch new converts.

Well this has been a good

coolbreeze's picture

Well this has been a good review,the comments do put PCLos in with the big guy's,then PCLos is not in competition with anyone,it's just being a Distro for whoever wants to use it.

I don't understand why the big issue 32bit v 64bit, if you want "bleeding edge" then you go for it, i'm happy that my box works.

I've been using PCLos since "Big Daddy" and never had ANY real problems that the community couldn't sort out, i have tried Mandy,Buntu's, Mepis Knoppix but always had PCLos installed, without PCLos i would still be on Windies.

As for PCLos being a fork of Mandy, not anymore, it was built from the ground up so it is hardly a fork of Mandy and Tex always gives credit to Mandy,The best Distro is the one that works for you, PCLos works for me, always has and i hope so for a long time to come.

At the end of the day, Linux IS Linux.

A reply

Josh Harris's picture

I think a 64 bit version is coming soon. We just got to be patient. What I want to know is there any software for linux that works with my home security camera system?

Josh H.
http://www.concealedsafety.com

A Class Act

Anonymous's picture

My family got a Tweet from these guys saying that our PASS Account (from a donation made in 2009) had been ported over to the new 2010 release, and to look for it or check our "email Spam folder" for it. Sure enough, our new PASS was in the GMail spam folder waiting for us.

Yeah, I know their fan-base is rabid; and I know why. Hopefully others will know this, as well.

32 bit PCLOS vs. 64 bit Linux

Anonymous's picture

Anyone who says PCLinuxOS is not based on Mandriva hasn't done their research and is just repeating what they've heard. Mandriva just doesn't get the credit they deserve when it comes to PCLinuxOS.
In PCLinuxOS 2010 release they mention Speedboot in THEIR list of features...
"Once installed to your computer speed boot makes getting to your desktop faster than ever before."
Speedboot was developed by Mandriva just like drakconfig (PCLinux Control Center) and drakinstall (PCLinux Installer) etc. Anyone who doesn't believe me play around with Mandriva and you will see that PCLinuxOS is still definately based on Mandriva.
That said PCLinuxOS is Mandriva on steroids with many customizations, tweaks and personalizations that make it better than Mandriva, IMO. When I mean better I mean everything runs faster, with an easy to use centralized package repository, with people who care about and listen to their community of users. And the attention to detail really makes the PCLinuxOS shine. In other words PCLinuxOS is what Mandriva could've been if they had paid more attention to their community as well as the community repositories and most of all Tex himself. Tex may very well be the reason Mandriva is going out of business!
As far as the speed at which the PCLinuxOS runs much kudos go to Tex and his crew for taking BFS mainstream. I don't know about the rest of you but on my box PCLinuxOS 2010 KDE is at least twice as fast as Mandriva Powerpack 2010 64 bit KDE. So to anyone who hasn't given PCLinuxOS a try because it's not 64 bit (like I was), just try it. It is the fastest OS I have ever used 32 or 64 bit and I've tried just about all the flavors out there especially in the past couple years.

Giving Credit.

 anonymous's picture

As seen on their website...

PCLinuxOS 2010 was built from the ground up using the packages in our repository. The packages in our repo may be original creations but may also contain repackaged and modified packages from Fedora, OpenSuse and Mandriva. PCLinuxOS packages may also contain patches from Ubuntu, Debian, PLD and Charka. The PCLinuxOS team would like to thank these distributions who may have indirectly contributed to the PCLinuxOS distribution.

PCLinuxOS 2010 32 bit

Anonymous's picture

Anyone who says PCLinuxOS is not based on Mandriva hasn't done their research and is just repeating what they've heard. Mandriva just doesn't get the credit they deserve when it comes to PCLinuxOS.
Even in PCLinuxOS latest release they list Speedboot in their list of features...
"Once installed to your computer speed boot makes getting to your desktop faster than ever before."
Well Speedboot was developed by Mandriva just like drakconfig (PCLinux Control Center) and drakinstall (PCLinux Installer). Anyone who doesn't believe me play around with Mandriva and you will see that PCLinuxOS is still based on Mandriva.
That said PCLinuxOS is Mandriva on steroids with many customizations, tweaks and personalizations that make it better than Mandriva, IMO. When I mean better I mean everything runs faster with an easy to use centralized package repository, with people who care about and listen to their community of users. And the attention to detail really makes PCLinuxOS shine. In other words PCLinuxOS is what Mandriva could've been if they had paid more attention to their community as well as the community repositories and most of all Tex! Actually Tex may very well be the reason they are going out of business!
As far as the speed at which the PCLinux OS runs all kudos go to Tex and his crew. I don't know about the rest of you but on my box PCLinuxOS 2010 KDE is at least twice as fast as Mandriva Powerpack 2010 64 bit KDE. So to anyone who hasn't given PCLinuxOS a try because it's not 64 bit (like I was), try it. It is the fastest OS I have ever used 32 or 64 bit and I've tried just about all the flavors out there especially in the past year or two.

It may be fast

Doug.Roberts's picture

But, I require more than 4GB of memory for my Linux desktop usage. PCLinux's lack of a 64-bit distro version is a show-stopper for me.

Bad-Breath Brigadier Doug.Roberts

Anonymous's picture

"Much ado about nothing" is the much more appropriate signature-quote for your loquaciousness on these boards.

You're only on-topic by a hair, but you're still a Hater. In this review of PCLinuxOS 2010, you let your Apsergers run rampant in these multi-posted Comments from your crowded head.

I can only assume that you're still brooding from them not asking you to write the article for them; so you FORCED the issue. Not the first time you wanted to use The Force to get your way, is it?

Stop hating on PClinuxOS and just get a breath mint and ask that Cute Thing from Accounting out on a date; you'll forget about 32-Bit PCLinuxOS in no time.

Pretty soon, you could be having a conversation with a Real Boy (not that there's anything wrong with it).

Unfair

Doug.Roberts's picture

It would be unfair to engage in a battle of wits against an opponent who is so obviously unarmed.

So I won't.

finally got you to hush...

Bad Breath Brigade's picture

Your arrogance will be your undoing...

How dare you take over another writers Comments section w/ distractive Goobledy-Gook. One comment will suffice, yet you persist in domineering the conversation w/ an obscure side-topic. Of course, you don't feel like you're out-of-line; narcissists never do.

How are the comments coming along over at your 'description' (not "How-To"?) of the HTPC that you built? Looks like you're getting a taste of what its like to have a steadfast member of the Bad Breath Brigade flex their pseudo-intellectual muscles in your Comments section. Perhaps now you can finally recognize your own folly?

It may be fast, AND...

Taco's picture

... you can use over 4GB on a 32-bit system w/ a modified kernel. I'm more than sure anyone would rather use a 64-bit system as it'd still make better & proper use of the total memory beyond 4GB... but if usage of said kernel shows a significant LACK of Ram-usage & performance, by all means, go with a 64-bit distro.

However, I will say, I've used Mandrake a bit during the past year or two, here and there. Dependency hell. Issues, etc. PCLOS is soo much better -- better packaging, and just like a proper "commercial" version of what Mandriva should be -- yet, it's not commercial.

You take a hit using the PAE

Anonymous's picture

You take a hit using the PAE kernel. I'm sure tho that a 64-bit version is coming soon.

http://www.concealedsafety.com

You're still left w/th 32-bit libraries

Doug.Roberts's picture

Agreed, you can run a 64 bit-aware kernel in a 32-bit distro, but why would you want to? You'd have to provide 64-bit library support for any 64-bit app that you'd be running there. Way more trouble that it would be worth, IMO. Better to install a 64-bit distro if you need 64-bit functionality.

I see lots of comments and

Wayne's picture

I see lots of comments and complaints here that things are not to their liking. It's not done like XXXXX distro.

Well thats the beauty of linux, if you don't like it--change it. If you can't change it--don't use it.

My 0.02$ worth.

I love PCLOS and have been using it or Mandrake since Tex started hacking at Mandrake. If you like the ugly brown U, that's your privilege, but I don't complain about it, I just don't use it.

my laptop is 64 bit

Anonymous's picture

and works fine with pclinuxos 2010 kde, i love pclinuxos!, i prefer installing pclinuxos than other distro that dont work. I also try moon os to my surprise work fine too, connect to wifi even in a live cd its base on ubuntu but work better than ubuntu 10.4 ubuntu do not detect wireless card, so im new to linux to deal with does problems.

64-bit hardware

Doug.Roberts's picture

There are two large disadvantages in running 32-bit software on 64-bit hardware.

1. You can only access up to 4 GB of memory on a 32-bit OS, whereas you can access up to a full 256 MB w/64-bit OS's.

2. Running in 32-bit emulation mode is not as fast as running 64-bit native code.

--Doug

re:64-bit hardware

djohnston's picture

As to #1, there is a 64-bit pae kernel available in the PCLOS repositories which allows addressing up to 64GB of memory. Your comment says "up to a full 256MB". I think you intended to say "up to a full 256 GB".

As to #2, yes, 64-bit native apps do execute slightly faster than 32-bit ones, but only slightly faster, so far. And not all 32-bit apps have 64-bit equivalents. I don't know what you mean by "emulation mode". An app is either using 32-bit libraries, or 64-bit ones.

Typo

Doug.Roberts's picture

Yes, I meant "256 GB". I'm constantly making that typo.

And by "emulation mode" I did mean that apps can use the 32-bit libraries -- probably a misuse of the word "emulation". As to performance, there can be a significant speed up by simply recompiling to take advantage of advanced 64-bit hardware. See

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X86-64

in particular:

"x86-64 is an extension of the x86 instruction set. It adds support for 64-bit general purpose registers, wider virtual memory addresses, and numerous other enhancements. The original specification was created by AMD, and has been implemented by AMD, Intel, VIA, and others. It is fully backwards compatible with 32-bit code.[1] Because the full 32-bit instruction set remains implemented in hardware without any intervening emulation, existing 32-bit x86 executables run with no compatibility or performance penalties,[2] although existing applications that are recoded to take advantage of new features of the processor design may see significant performance increases."

Note that recoding is not necessarily always required to achieve a performance improvement over 32-bit; some compilers are pretty smart about optimizing for a particular architecture.

One of these days I'll write an article that details our experiences in porting a 32-bit distributed application for the first time to a 64-bit cluster. There are a number of interesting ways that code which runs just fine on a 32-bit platform can crash when recompiled to run on 64-bit hardware.

--Doug

PCLOS is great, it's better

Azmi's picture

PCLOS is great, it's better than Mandriva. PCLOS run so fast on my 6530s laptop. Mandriva? It even my system wounded :D

Nice release, too bad icons

Bobcat's picture

Nice release, too bad icons are still ugly, texts and labels are still too large, spacing and balance of items is dubious so on.

Even XP with the zune theme looks better. Maybe in 15 years it will be also pleasant to the eye?

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