Rsync, It's GRRRRaphical!

Every year for our Readers' Choice survey, the venerable tool rsync gets votes for favorite backup tool. That never surprises us, because every time I need to copy a group of files and folders, rsync is the tool I use by default. It really has everything—local folder support, SSH tunneling support, delta-only synchronization, speed, versatility, and quite frankly, it's just a great program. It has everything—except a GUI.

Don't get me wrong; rsync works great without a GUI. I use it on the command line almost daily. The problem with rsync's amazing power is a rather complex set of arguments. It's possible to learn those flags, but for the neophyte user, they can be overwhelming. That's where Grsync really shines.

Grsync does a great job of turning countless command-line options into a manageable collection of check boxes and text-entry areas. When you add the nifty "sessions" feature that remembers settings along with source and destinations, it turns into the perfect filesystem sync tool. If you've ever felt rsync was powerful but too complex to use on a regular basis, I highly recommend Grsync. For making such a powerful tool accessible to the unwashed masses, Grsync gets this month's Editors' Choice Award. Now go copy some files! See http://grsync.sourceforge.net.

______________________

Shawn Powers is an Associate Editor for Linux Journal. You might find him chatting on the IRC channel, or Twitter

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CK's picture

http://www.hairwigs.de/ A lot of people in our industry haven't had very diverse experiences. So they don't have enough dots to connect, and they end up with very linear solutions without a broad perspective on the problem. The broader one's understanding of the human experience, the better design we will have.

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Derwick's picture

You're so cool! I don't think I've read anything like this before. So good to find somebody with some original thoughts on this subject. Thanks for starting this up.

This is cool. Gonna give it a

Al's picture

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I love rsync as well. anti

Crala's picture

I love rsync as well. anti snore pillow. Too awesome to be true :D

› Rsync, It's

Anonymous's picture


Rsync, It's GRRRRaphical!
Jan 02, 2013 By Shawn Powers
in

Editors' Choice
SysAdmin
Tech Tips

Every year for our Readers' Choice survey, the venerable tool rsync gets votes for favorite backup tool. That never surprises us, because every time I need to copy a group of files and folders, rsync is the tool I use by default. It really has everything—local folder support, SSH tunneling support, delta-only synchronization, speed, versatility, and quite frankly, it's just a great program. It has everything—except a GUI.

Don't get me wrong; rsync works great without a GUI. I use it on the command line almost daily. The problem with rsync's amazing power is a rather complex set of arguments. It's possible to learn those flags, but for the neophyte user, they can be overwhelming. That's where Grsync really shines.

Grsync does a great job of turning countless command-line options into a manageable collection of check boxes and text-entry areas. When you add the nifty "sessions" feature that remembers settings along with source and destinations, it turns into the perfect filesystem sync tool. If you've ever felt rsync was powerful but too complex to use on a regular basis, I highly recommend Grsync. For making such a powerful tool accessible to the unwashed masses, Grsync gets this month's Editors' Choice Award. Now go copy some files! See http://grsync.sourceforge.net.
______________________

Shawn Powers is an Associate Editor for Linux Journal. You might find him chatting on the IRC channel, or Twitter

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hi
avg123's picture
Submitted by avg123 (not verified) on Wed, 02/13/2013 - 02:39.

This the way you just did.I’m really impressed that there’s so much about this subject that’s been uncovered and you did it so well, with so much class. Good one you, man ! Really great stuff here.
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reply

Query regarding M.tech(Computers) thesis
Anonymous's picture
Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Sat, 01/12/2013 - 11:05.

can anyone plz suggest me topics regarding latest research areas in linux....

i will be doing my m.tech thesis on the same.....

or plz provide some links where i can be a part of such ongoing project in india ...

plz....

thanks in advance....

reply

A lot of people in our
get twitter followers's picture
Submitted by get twitter followers (not verified) on Sun, 02/24/2013 - 11:45.

A lot of people in our industry haven't had very diverse experiences. So they don't have enough dots to connect, and they end up with very linear solutions without a broad perspective on the problem. The broader one's understanding of the human experience, the better design we will have.

reply

It really has
autel maxidas ds708 pro's picture
Submitted by autel maxidas ds708 pro (not verified) on Fri, 01/11/2013 - 21:20.

It really has everything—local folder support, SSH tunneling support, delta-only synchronization, speed, versatility, and quite frankly, it's just a great program.

__________________
ds708
http://www.autelcn.com/

reply

Rsync syncs with samba shares?
Arvi Pingus's picture
Submitted by Arvi Pingus (not verified) on Fri, 01/11/2013 - 11:59.

In the pasted I tried to use Grsync, Luckybackup, rdiff-backup etc. but always ran into the problem that the underneath rsync didn't work with samba shares unless I mounted them as local shares. With a (variable) number of windows-pc's in my network I like to sync like say (MS Windows only) Vice Versa. Point your target and when it is up and running sync (the differences). Saves a lot of time, backing up only the files that changed or were newly created.

reply

Nothing like the command line
Recettes Thai's picture
Submitted by Recettes Thai (not verified) on Thu, 01/10/2013 - 05:39.

Nothing like the command line to me too !
I use rsync on a daily basis, most of it to synchronize datas between servers/directory.

I also heard about unison. Does someone use it ? What's the diff with rsync ?

reply

The main difference between
Anonymous's picture
Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 01/11/2013 - 08:34.

The main difference between rsync and Unison is that Unison's had both a and graphical user interface for a long time while rsync's been just command line.

reply

rdiff-backup
Rick's picture
Submitted by Rick (not verified) on Tue, 01/08/2013 - 19:19.

I love rsync, but If you want a real backup tool, try rdiff-backup (http://rdiff-backup.nongnu.org/).

It's a command-line incremental (reverse diffs) backup tool and uses librsync so it's very efficient.

reply

Clearly you have never used grsync
Anonymous's picture
Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 01/07/2013 - 09:21.

yeah! I was excited about grsync when i first learned about it ... over a year ago. then, i installed and used it to backup a fairly large directory containing lots and lots of files. and what did i find:

* as mentioned earlier, grsync's performance is pathetic
* grsync crashed on me a couple of times

over all, I figured it was time to go back to my scripts to backup my data.

grsync could evolve into a great tool, but, till then ... stick with rsync wrapped in scripts. just my $0.02.

reply

I must agreed. I tried many
Anonymous's picture
Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 01/08/2013 - 04:39.

I must agreed.

I tried many different graphical tools, include grsync and have always gone back to my shell script.

Much neater.

reply

I really love what you do,
Bichon maltais's picture
Submitted by Bichon maltais (not verified) on Sat, 01/05/2013 - 03:39.

I really love what you do, bravo! Thank you very much for sharing with us this article.

reply

Performance
marshal's picture
Submitted by marshal (not verified) on Fri, 01/04/2013 - 04:54.

Performance of Grsync is very low.
The command line rsync with the same arguments is about 12 times faster on my PC then Grsync.
Data copied: ~850MB source code, about 80000 files under Grsync took ~12 minutes while rsync ~1 minute.

reply

Luckybackup
Dave Ashmore's picture
Submitted by Dave Ashmore (not verified) on Thu, 01/03/2013 - 04:29.

Check out Luckybackkup it is a guide for rsync & ssh. Real nice.

reply

I agree, I use Luckybackup as
Leona's picture
Submitted by Leona (not verified) on Tue, 01/08/2013 - 04:33.

I agree, I use Luckybackup as you can set up scheduled tasks too, very powerful.

reply

Tried luckybackup, then
Anonymous's picture
Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Thu, 01/03/2013 - 11:43.

Tried luckybackup, then Grsync and I haven't looked back.
IMHO Grsync is much simpler.

reply

Rsync
Esteban's picture
Submitted by Esteban (not verified) on Wed, 01/02/2013 - 14:22.

I started with Grsync then viewed the commands. I use a script with rsync commands to back up my data. I still use Grsync - it's simple, fast, easy, etc.

reply

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Please note that comments may not appear immediately, so there is no need to repost your comment.IBM's platform as a service (PaaS), IBM SmartCloud Application Services, is now generally available and ready to help your development team collaborate in the cloud!
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hi

avg123's picture

This the way you just did.I’m really impressed that there’s so much about this subject that’s been uncovered and you did it so well, with so much class. Good one you, man ! Really great stuff here.
buy real facebook likes

Query regarding M.tech(Computers) thesis

Anonymous's picture

can anyone plz suggest me topics regarding latest research areas in linux....

i will be doing my m.tech thesis on the same.....

or plz provide some links where i can be a part of such ongoing project in india ...

plz....

thanks in advance....

A lot of people in our

get twitter followers's picture

A lot of people in our industry haven't had very diverse experiences. So they don't have enough dots to connect, and they end up with very linear solutions without a broad perspective on the problem. The broader one's understanding of the human experience, the better design we will have.

It really has

autel maxidas ds708 pro's picture

It really has everything—local folder support, SSH tunneling support, delta-only synchronization, speed, versatility, and quite frankly, it's just a great program.

__________________
ds708
http://www.autelcn.com/

Rsync syncs with samba shares?

Arvi Pingus's picture

In the pasted I tried to use Grsync, Luckybackup, rdiff-backup etc. but always ran into the problem that the underneath rsync didn't work with samba shares unless I mounted them as local shares. With a (variable) number of windows-pc's in my network I like to sync like say (MS Windows only) Vice Versa. Point your target and when it is up and running sync (the differences). Saves a lot of time, backing up only the files that changed or were newly created.

Nothing like the command line

Recettes Thai's picture

Nothing like the command line to me too !
I use rsync on a daily basis, most of it to synchronize datas between servers/directory.

I also heard about unison. Does someone use it ? What's the diff with rsync ?

The main difference between

Anonymous's picture

The main difference between rsync and Unison is that Unison's had both a and graphical user interface for a long time while rsync's been just command line.

rdiff-backup

Rick's picture

I love rsync, but If you want a real backup tool, try rdiff-backup (http://rdiff-backup.nongnu.org/).

It's a command-line incremental (reverse diffs) backup tool and uses librsync so it's very efficient.

Clearly you have never used grsync

Anonymous's picture

yeah! I was excited about grsync when i first learned about it ... over a year ago. then, i installed and used it to backup a fairly large directory containing lots and lots of files. and what did i find:

* as mentioned earlier, grsync's performance is pathetic
* grsync crashed on me a couple of times

over all, I figured it was time to go back to my scripts to backup my data.

grsync could evolve into a great tool, but, till then ... stick with rsync wrapped in scripts. just my $0.02.

I must agreed. I tried many

Anonymous's picture

I must agreed.

I tried many different graphical tools, include grsync and have always gone back to my shell script.

Much neater.

I really love what you do,

Bichon maltais's picture

I really love what you do, bravo! Thank you very much for sharing with us this article.

Performance

marshal's picture

Performance of Grsync is very low.
The command line rsync with the same arguments is about 12 times faster on my PC then Grsync.
Data copied: ~850MB source code, about 80000 files under Grsync took ~12 minutes while rsync ~1 minute.

Luckybackup

Dave Ashmore's picture

Check out Luckybackkup it is a guide for rsync & ssh. Real nice.

I agree, I use Luckybackup as

Leona's picture

I agree, I use Luckybackup as you can set up scheduled tasks too, very powerful.

Tried luckybackup, then

Anonymous's picture

Tried luckybackup, then Grsync and I haven't looked back.
IMHO Grsync is much simpler.

Rsync

Esteban's picture

I started with Grsync then viewed the commands. I use a script with rsync commands to back up my data. I still use Grsync - it's simple, fast, easy, etc.

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