Munich Linux Migration Project LiMux Reports Success

LiMux, a project to convert local government institutions to Linux and open source software in Munich, has exceeded initial expectations. The project has done slightly better than projections of 8,500 and now boasts 9,000 Linux migrated workstations. The progress and evolution of this project that began in 2003 is well worth examination.

LiMux is the name of both the migration project and a specialized Linux distribution. The LiMux distro, which is based on Ubuntu, is certified by the German government for use in both government institutions and private businesses. I've long been an advocate of this approach, and I wish that more was being done in the UK and the US to ratify a standard national Linux distro.

It's nice to be able to report on this success story after the disappointing news, earlier in the year, that the German Foreign Office had abandoned its Linux adoption plan in favor of a return to Windows and other proprietary software. One thing that the community has had to learn is that celebration upon hearing the announcement of a plan for Linux adoption is sometimes premature. The news that migration has been successful and is going well is a more reliable indicator that Linux is establishing a foothold on the desktops of government workers.

In a 2010 webpost, Florian Schießl, one of the architects of the project, admitted that they had underestimated the difficulty of the task and labeled their initial approach “naive”. When the project was first set in motion in 2003, there were found to be 1000 IT workers in 51 data centers serving 33,000 staff. Part of the problem was that the proprietary software that was in use was far from being as homogenized as most people would have guessed. As Schießl says:

"No common directory, no common user, system or hardware management. Different tools for software distribution and system management. More than 300 apps, many of them redundant, e.g. using Dreamweaver, Frontpage, Fusion etc. for HTML-editing. 21 different Windows clients, different patch levels, different security concepts. This was Munich’s IT situation when LiMux started."


So, as part of clearing the way for Linux and open source adoption, the team have to had reorganize government IT policy to move it away from the rag-tag collection of mismatched systems that had organically evolved. Don't forget that in addition to operating systems and applications, a project like this one has to consider document formats and templates. Schießl considers the focus on ODF throughout the organization and across different platfroms to have been a big help for the project as a whole. To help with this, the LiMux project has created WollMux, an open source template creation plugin for OpenOffice.

A lot of attempts at large migrations to open source software seem to be so focused on the software and hardware that they tend to forget the other other important factor: people. Forgetting to win over the staff seems to be a common trait of migration projects that fail to accomplish their goals. From 2008 onwards, the LiMux team began to adopt a more considered approach to migration, beginning with smaller deployments and lots of data gathering in order to gauge success.

Overall, it's good news and a project worth studying by anyone interested in large scale migrations to Linux.

The official LiMux page (English language)

Flag clipart provided by: 1 Page Design

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UK based freelance writer Michael Reed writes about technology, retro computing, geek culture and gender politics.

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The beauty of open source

Guest's picture

The beauty of open source software is you can alter the codes and modify it according to your needs and specifications. That's why a lot of government nowadays integrate their software systems with open source software primarily because it's made available for everyone.
Bill Bartmann

great points

Okawards 's picture

This is maybe just a part of issue to the government, but this post telling something more about how to organize this program, and very thanks for your article about Munich Linux Migration Project LiMux Reports Success, great points! crystal awards

great points

Okawards 's picture

This is maybe just a part of issue to the government, but this post telling something more about how to organize this program, and very thanks for your article about Munich Linux Migration Project LiMux Reports Success, great points! crystal awards

In a 2010 webpost, Florian

World end's picture

In a 2010 webpost, Florian Schießl, one of the architects of the project, admitted that they had underestimated the difficulty of the task and labeled their initial approach “naive”.

Er now it is 2012.

Cost of Migration

Trevor's picture

I was curious as to the overall cost of the project. It should include the cost of training the support staff of the new linux distro and the cost of the helpdesk to support it.

About the costs

sorkkarauta's picture

"It should include the cost of training the support staff of the new linux distro and the cost of the helpdesk to support it"

Those costs exists only once during the migration phase.

Need to ask, how much are the training costs when every 3rd year comes new incombatible version of Windows?

The Munich situation is not a matter of short time costs, it can be seen as an investment for permanent situation where the technology chande provide a situation where in no commercial vendor lock and related feeds.

source

Anonymous's picture

My source was the page you linked: http://www.muenchen.de/Rathaus/dir/limux/english/index.html

"What is LiMux?

The main target of the LiMux project is to complete the City Council's order to run open source software on the administration's desktops in the future - "LiMux Basisclient"
First worldwide certificated linuxbased work station - Made for feel good
Free software for the operating system and office software
LiMux Basisclient based on Linux and free software:
Debian GNU/Linux „sarge“ (Distribution), K Desktop Environment - KDE (Graphical user interface), OpenOffice.org (Offices), Firefox (Browser), Thunderbird (E-Mail), Gimp (Image editing)
Applications will be developed platform independent, preference webbased"

The wikipedia article cites no sources to support the assertion that Ubuntu is now the base. In fact it is tagged with [citation needed]

I ran the German Limux page through Google Translate and could find no reference to Ubuntu.

Of course it's possible that it is now based on Ubuntu but the web pages haven't been updated to reflect this.

Not "based on Ubuntu"!

Anonymous's picture

LiMux is based on Debian Sarge.

According to Wikipedia it

Michael Reed's picture

According to Wikipedia it is.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Limux

"LiMux is also the name of the Linux distribution being used for the project. LiMux is the first Linux-based workplace certified for industry use (ISO 9241) by the TÜV IT, Technical Service, Germany.[5] It was based on Debian. Version 3 available from 2011 is based on Ubuntu 8.10 and version 4 will be based on Ubuntu 10.10.[citation needed]"

If you have a better source, I'll correct the post.

UK based freelance writer Michael Reed writes about technology, retro computing, geek culture and gender politics.

Source

Anonymous's picture

This is correct as stated on their official Blog:
"Der LiMux Client beinhaltet eine neue Version des Linux Betriebssystems (auf Basis Ubuntu 10.4 und KDE 3.5),"
'the new client is based on a new Version of the Linux OS (Ubuntu10.4 and KDE 3.5)'
http://www.it-muenchen-blog.de/2011/08/munchen-bringt-neues-release-4-0-des-limux-clients-heraus/

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